100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 21, 1997 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1997-03-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

2- The Michigan Daily - Friday, March 21, 1997
NATION/WRou
Liggett admits smoking is dangerous

WASHINGTON (AP) - In a dramatic confession,
the maker of Chesterfield cigarettes settled 22 state
lawsuits yesterday by agreeing to warn on every pack
that smoking is addictive and admitting the industry
rnarkets cigarettes to teen-agers.
"They know it and they will help us prove it;' said
Arizona Attorney General Grant Woods in announcing
the settlement. He called the deal "the beginning of the
end for this conspiracy of lies and deception perpetuat-
ed on the American public by the tobacco companies."
Liggett also provided thousands of documents that
detail industry-wide discussions of tobacco dangers
and marketing, and Woods said Liggett has begun
Transferring papers to the custody of state judges.
"On the basis of these documents, tobacco compa-
ny executives could go to jail," said Florida Attorney

General Robert Butterworth.
But tobacco giant Philip Morris and three other
Liggett competitors won a temporary restrainiig order
yesterday to keep those documents secret for at least
10 more days.
And Philip Morris said in a statement it "will contin-
ue to defend vigorously against the meritless lawsuits"
Woods said the attorneys general would not attempt
to see the disputed papers until judges decided
whether they must remain confidential.
The 22 states will divide 25 percent of pretax prof-
its over the next 25 years from Liggett, which has just
2 percent of the U.S. cigarette market. But if Liggett
merges with another tobacco firm, which chief execu-
tive Bennett LeBow has attempted to do, it would
immediately pay an additional $25 million to the

states, Woods said.
The prosecutors emphasized they pursued Liggett
not for money, but for evidence in the states' continu-
ing lawsuits against the industry.
Settling the state lawsuits, which seek to recover
Medicaid funds spent treating sick smokers, does not
end litigation against Liggett's competitors, which have
more money to withstand the estimated $500 million
in legal costs the iindustry faces from state litigation
and private suits. Indeed, Mississippi's case against
Liggett's competitors is set to go to trial June 2.
Nor does the settlement, an enlargement of conces-
sions Liggett initially made with five of the states a
year ago, end Liggett's own liability in private suits,
although it is expected to pursue additional similar
deals.

# ARO0UND ,0a1&THE N 1
Experts seek to rotect netic info
WASHINGTON - A prestigious coalition of health experts and ethicists yes-
terday called for legislation or other measures to protect against abuse of an indi-
vidual's genetic information in the workplace - for example, using the data to
deny jobs, promotions, insurance coverage or other benefits.
In recent years, rapidly growing technology and other advances have enab
geneticists to find disease-related genes in human DNA and to develop new
to detect who carries them. At the same time, health officials say that many people
who might otherwise benefit from knowing about their inherited risks for certain
diseases have chosen to avoid these tests out of fear that such information will be
used against them.
"Genetics is giving us our best hope yet of understanding what goes wrong at
the most fundamental level when disease occurs;" said Dr. Francis Collins, direc-
tor of the National Human Genome Research Institute, part of the National
Institutes of Health. "But if people are worried ... they will be unable to take
advantage of the enormous opportunities genetics research offers."
The recommendations to provide protection against abuse of genetic data are
published in today's issue of the journal Science and come from experts repress
ing the federal government and the private sector convened to explore the social,
ethical and legal ramifications of the research.

RELIGIOUS
SERVICES
AVAVAVAVA
CAMPUS CHAPEL
Christian Reformed campus ministry
1236 Washtenaw Ct. 668-7421
Pastor: Rev. Don Postema 662-2404
10 pm: Palm Sunday Service
in Word and Music
Ms. Kyla Ebels, Student Ministry
CANTERBURY HOUSE
Episcopal Ministry at
the University of Michigan
721 E. Huron St. Ann Arbor, MI. 48104
(313) 665-0606
The Rev. Matthew Lawrence, Chaplain
SUNDAYS:
*Holy Eucharist followed by supper,
5:00 Lord of Light Lutheran Church
801 S Forest Ave.
Student Run Bible Study
for students not afraid to ask
questions every Thursday at 6:45 PM
at Canterbury House
KOREAN CHURCH OF ANN ARBOR
3301 Ceek Dr. 971-9777
SUNDAY: 9:30 a.m. English,
11 a.m. & 7:30 p.m. Korean
ST. ANDREWS EPISCOPAL CHURCH
306 N. Division 663-0518
(2 blocks north and 1 block west
of intersection of Huron and State).
SUNDAY: Eucharists- Sam and 10am
Adult Education- 9am
Call for Weekday service times,
't to get on the mailing list,
or if you have questions.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL, LCMS
1511 Washtenaw, Near Hill
SUNDAY: 10:30 a.m.
MAUNDY THURSDAY: Supper 6:00 P.M.
GOOD FRIDAY: 2:00 P.M. & 7:00 P.M.
SATURDAY EASTER VIGIL: 11:00 P.M.
EASTER SUNDAY:10:30 A.M.
Pastor Ed Krauss 663-5560

e
House outlaws abortion procedure
WASHINGTON (AP) -The House in last year's vote and enough to over- gains in the Senate last Novem]
voted overwhelmingly yesterday to out- ride a likely veto. The vote gave the an admission by one abortior

ber, and
n rights

law an increasingly controversial abor-
tion procedure, renewing a fight with
President Clinton that produced a veto
of an identical measure last year.
Lawmakers approved the ban on
what opponents call "partial-birth abor-
tions" 295 to 136, a bigger margin than
.~~eduidlailt...
YELLOW
CAB'
200 Commee Ann Artor, MI 48103
663-3355
* Largest and newest fleet
M 4 can share the fare
0 Service to metro airport
Night Ride service * 663-3888
24 Hour Taxi Service

House Republican leadership a much-
needed victory Congress heads home
for the two-week Easter recess. The
action also gave the bill momentum in
the Senate, where it will be considered
after the recess.
The question now is whether GOP

advocate that he lied about the nature
and frequency of the procedure, will
produce a veto-proof Senate majority.
"Right now we probably don't have
the votes to override a veto, but it's get-
ting closer," Senate Majority Leader
Trent Lott (R-Miss.) told reporters.

SPRING
Continued from Page 1
Aside from a nice place for students
to forget about school and to do many
different activities, the Arb has many
upcoming spring-focused events.
Letts said any interested visitors
should come and enjoy the Arb, as long
as they follow the rules to protect the
plants and trees. The Arb will continue to
blossom for months to come.
A three-year study conducted by
SPRINTING
LOWEST PRICES!
HIGHEST QUALITY!
FASTEST SER WCEI
* 1002 PONTIAC TR.
994-1367

University researchers at the arboretum
helped determine the average flowering
dates of many forms of vegetation,
including flowering plants, trees and
woody plants.
In April, the pussy willow, star mag-
nolia, blue violet, crocus and the daf-
fodil will begin to bloom.
In May, the Arb will be home to the
wild plum, crab apple, lilac, service-
berry and the redbud. These are only
a few of the plants and vegetation that
will join the scores of trees in the Arb
this spring.
RELIGION
Continued from Page 1.
Despite the recent improvements to
the policy, Scaglione said the policy
could evolve and improve over time,
"It's a good first step - it's much
better than no policy," Scaglione said.
"It articulates what student rights and
faculty responsibilities are. A lot of
students didn't know they had rights.
The policy empowers them to seek
alternative arrangements with profes-
sors."
Scaglione said that religious con-
flicts are a fairly common occur-
rence for religiously observant stu-
dents.

Reno hires outside
immigration expert
WASHINGTON - Responding to
scathing congressional criticism, the
Clinton administration has taken the
unusual step of hiring an outside con-
sultant to conduct a multimillion-dollar
review of the naturalization process to
"safeguard the integrity" of the system
that monitors who becomes U.S. citi-
zens. '
Attorney General Janet Reno
announced the move yesterday and
called it an "important milestone" in an
effort to revamp a process that congres-
sional oversight committees say has
virtually broken down, allowing tens of
thousands of applicants to become citi-
zens without required FBI criminal
background checks.
Meanwhile, Immigration and
Naturalization Service Commissioner
Doris Meissner said that investigators
thus far have found only 168 cases of
felons who apparently were naturalized
and now face having their citizenship
revoked. House Republicans heading

the investigation of citizenship
practices have predicted that the
number ultimately will be in the
thousands.
Selected to lead the $4.3 million cit-
izenship "re-engineering" effort, said
Reno, is Coopers and Lybrand, a'
six" accounting and consulting firm
based in McLean, Va.
O'Donnell poll finds
star 'not kissable'
NEW YORK - Scope is learning a
painful lesson: Provoking Rosie
O'Donnell can leave a bad taste in your
mouth.
With an eager assist from the mot
wash maker's archrival, Listerine, the
talk show queen has exacted sweet
revenge for a Scope poll that pro-
claimed O'Donnell one of the nation's
least kissable celebrities.
O'Donnell quickly went on the attack.
"I'd just want you to remember that
Listerine kills the germs that cause bad
breath," she said on her talk show Feb.
18.

y"Ue8WTHE WO'*::*4ad"'.X. 4
;E ~

Iliilt

IDIAII'

WHAT

ii;ii"

Thugs raid Albanian
government bank
GJIROKASTER, Albania --Armed
bandits rolled up to the regional gov-
ernment bank in the center of this
southeastern town on three nights this
week, freely firing automatic weapons
in the air and running off with every-
thing they could carry.
Yesterday morning, no one here
could explain just how or why thugs
continue to plunder the bank -
although the ski-masked gunmen have
yet to figure out how to crack the vault
- or to roam with such abandon that
even Albania's new prime minister, a
former mayor here, canceled a visit.
"We're hoping for calm," said Ermir
Asllani, a teacher who won't get his
salary this week because the nightly
raids at the bank have emptied it of the
cash to pay state workers. "The town is
in the hands of bandits.... People are
only thinking of how to protect their
property and themselves."
Far from the capital, Tirana, towns in
southern Albania still rattle with gun-

fire after midnight and are paralyzed in
their efforts to quell upheaval and crim-
inal chaos. In this town of stone hous-
es, stone walls and stone streets abot
170 miles south of Tirana, and in n
by Tepelena, residents are living amid
rumors and fear. Neither citizens'
groups nor local governments appear to
be able to restore order.
Swiss banks helped
Portuguese buy gold
BERN, Switzerland - In its t
comprehensive study of transact s
during World War II, the Swiss
National Bank confirmedtyesterday
that it helped other neutral European
countries buy millions of dollars worth
of Nazi gold.
The study confirmed that the bank
bought 1.7 billion Swiss francs -- then
about $425 million - worth of gold
from the Nazis between 1940 and
1945, and passed about 500 million
fr ncs worth onto other countries. *
- Compiled from Daily wire reports.

-.
<.
.
-.
4.
.

ANN ARBOR WILL BE WEARING
THIS SPRING!!!
ONMARCH 22, 1997A T6PM
S.I.S.T. ER.

STUDENTS IN STOCKWELL TRANSMITTING ETHNIC RELATIONS
TOGETHER WITH
MICHIGAN BOOK & SUPPLY
ARE BRINGING
THE ESSENCE OF STYLE
TO STOCKWELL HALL 'S BLUE CARPET LOUNGE

The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967) is published Monday through Friday during the fall and winter terms by
students at the University of Michigan. Subscriptions for fall term, starting in September. via U.S. mail are
$85. Winter term (January through April) is $95, yearlong (September through April) is $165. On-campus
scriptions for fall term are $35. Subscriptions must be pepaid.
The Michigan Daily is a member of the Associated Press and the Associated collegiate Press.
ADDRESS: The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard St., Ann A03or, Michigan 48109-1327.
PHONE NUMBERS (All area code 313): News 76-DAILY; Arts 763-0379; Sports 647-3336; Opinion 764-0552;
Circulation 764-0558; classified advertising 764-0557;1Display advertising 764-0554; Billing 764-0550.
E-mail letters to the editor to daily.etters@umich.edu. World Wide Web: http://www.pub.umich.edu/daity/.
EDITORIAL STAFF Josh White, Editor in Chief
NEWS Jodi S. Cohen, Managing Editor
EDITORS: Jeff Eldridge, Laune Mayk, Anupama Reddy, Will Weisser t.
STAFF: Janet Adamy, Briantampbel, Greg Cox. Jeff Enderton, Sarringland, Megan Exley, Maria Hackett, Heather Kamins, Kerry Klaus,
Amy Klein, Jeffrey Kosseff,fMarc Lightdaie. Carrie Luria. Chris Metiiko, Tim O'Connell, Katie Plona. Susan T. Port, Alice Robinson, Ericka M.
Smith. Ann Stewart, Ait K. Thavaralah, Michetle Lee Thompson, K&ie Wang, Jenni Yachnin.
EDITORIAL Erin Marsh, Editor
ASSOCIATE EDITOR: Paul Serila.
EDITORIAL ASSISTANT: Jason Stoffer.
STAFF: Emily Achenbaum, Kristin Arola, Ellen Friedman. Samuel odstein, Heather Gordon, Scott Hunter, Yukt Kuniyuki, Jim Lasser,
Lockyer, James Miller, Pamtha Mukhopadhyay, Zachary M. Rami, Jack Schillaci, Megan Schimpf, Ron Steiger.
SPORTS Nicholas J. Cotsonika, Managing Editor
EDITORS:A. Michael Goldenbach, J. Robert Lero, Will McCahil. Oanielle Rumore.
STAFF: Nancy Berger. T.J Berka, Evan Braunstein, Chris Farah, Jordan Field, John Fniedberg, Kim Hart. Kevin Kasborski, Josh Keirbaum,
Andy Knudsen, Chad Ku0la, Andy ltatack, Fred Link, B.J. Luria, Brooke McGahey. Afshin Mohamadi, Sharat Rayu. Pranay Reddy, Sara Rontal,
Jim Rose. Tracy Sandler, Richard Shin, Mark Snyder, Barry Sollenberger, Nita Srivastava, Dan Stillman, Jacob Wheeler.
ARTS Brian A. Gnatt, Jennifer Petlinski, Editors
WEEKEND. ETC. EDITORS: Greg Parker, Elan A. Stavros.
SUB-EDITORS: Lise Hanwin (Music), Christopher Tkaczyk (Carups Arts). Bryan Lark (Film), Elizabeth Lucas (Books), Kelly Xintaris (TV/New
Media).
STAFF: Dean Bakopoulos. Colin Bartos. Eugene Bowen. Nealt C Carruth. Anitha Chalam, Kari Jones. Emily Lambert, Kristin Long,
Stephanie Love, James Miller, Aaron Bennie, Julia Shih, Anders Smith-Lindall, Philip Son, Prashant Tamaska, Michael Zilberman.
PHOTO Mark Friedman, Sara Stillhnan, Editors
STAFF: Josh Biggs. Jennifer Bradley-Swift. Ala Dekleva Cohen Rob Gilmore, John Kraft, Margaret Myers, Jully Park, Kristen Schaefer,
Jeannie Servaas, Addie Smith, Jonathan Summer, Joe Westrae, Warren Zinn.
COPY DESK Rebecca Berkun, Editor
STAFF: Lydia Alspech, Elizabeth Lucas, Elizabeth Mills, Emi4l)D'Neill, Matt Spewak, David Ward, Jen Woodward.
ONLINE Adam Pollock, Editor
STAFF: Caros Castillo Elizabeth Lucas, Seneca Sutter, Seytt Wilcox.
GRAPHICS Tracey Harris, Editor
STAFF: Lisa Bellon, Elissa Bowes. Seder Rurns. Sumako SXawai. Marcy McCormick, Erin Rager, Jordan Young.

PRESENTING

ANN ARBOR'S

FINEST

C O N T E M P O R A R Y

CLOTHING

AND

ACCESSORIES FROM

EXPR ESS

AN TOES

BIVOUAC

COA CH
& S UPP L Y

LAD YFOO TL OCKER

MICHIGAN B
" " r-. r Vr -I XTr rn 9 eT

OK

451

F

r rI Nr r v ? F-% /"1 11

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan