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November 13, 1996 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1996-11-13

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....

NATION/WORLD

The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, November 13, 1996 - 7

.Deadlock
remains
i Hebron
The Washington Post
* CAIRO - Making what is probably
his last trip to the-Middle East before
retirement, Secretary of State Warren
Christopher failed yesterday to break
the deadlock in Palestinian-Israeli
negotiations over a long-delayed Israeli
troop pullback from the West Bank city
of Hebron.
But in a valedictory speech to sever-
al thousand business people and diplo-
mats gathered for a major regional eco-
imic conference here, Christopher
'd da Hebron deal is "very close at
hand," and he expressed optimism that
the "traumas" of the past year - begin-
ning with the assassination last
November of Israeli Prime Minister
Yitzhak Rabin - could be overcome.
"Over the last year, and especially in
recent weeks, the peace process has
demonstrated great resilience,"
Christopher told delegates to the third
nual Middle East and North Africa
conomic Conference. "By looking
back into the abyss, both Arabs and
Israelis recognized the imperative of
moving forward."
Christopher, 71, has staked enormous
amounts of prestige on achieving a com-
prehensive settlement of the Arab-Israeli
conflict. His frequent shuttle missions to
the region have earned him widespread
recognition - if not always respect -
ong Arabs and Israelis alike.
In the first years of the Clinton
administration, Christopher's lawyerly,
low-key negotiating style seemed to be
bearing fruit. Israel signed separate
peace accords with the Palestinians and

Army instructors charged
with sexual misconduct

FORT LEONARD WOOD, Mo.
(AP) - In the second Army sex scan-
dal in less than a week, three instructors
at one of the nation's biggest basic-
training posts faced charges yesterday
of sexual misconduct with young
women recruits.
The charges were announced five
days after a sex scandal broke at the
military's Aberdeen Proving Ground in
Maryland.
The three soldiers at Fort Leonard
Wood face charges ranging from con-
sensual intercourse to indecent assault,
or touching. Army regulations ban sex-
ual relationships between commanders
and subordinates. The recruits were 21
years old on average and were undergo-
ing basic training.
The Army did not say when the
charges were filed. One court-martial

was to begin yesterday; the others will
be conducted within the month, it said.
A Pentagon spokesperson said there
was no connection between the Fort
Leonard and Aberdeen cases. The Fort
Leonard cases came to light before the
Army set up a hot line for reports of
sexual misconduct, said Lt. Col.
William Harkey.
The Army did not identify the
Missouri soldiers except to say that all
are non-commissioned officers and that
one or two are drill sergeants. Other
allegations of misconduct at Fort Wood
were also under investigation.
At the Army Ordnance Center at the
Aberdeen Proving Ground, the Army
last week charged four drill instructors
and a captain with raping, sexually
harassing or otherwise having improper
relationships with at least a dozen

young women recruits in their first
weeks of training at Aberdeen.
The men were suspended along with
15 other instructors.
The Army said trainees at Fort
Wood are told their first day on the
base how to report harassment or
uncomfortable situations involving
other soldiers.
Yesterday, the Army allowed
reporters to speak with a group of Fort
Leonard trainees who have been in the
military for about six weeks. None of
the women said they felt sexual pres-
sure or harassment.
"My drill sergeants are very, very
helpful to us," said Pvt. Sheila Stanton,
20, of Frostproof, Fla. "They train us
hard, they treat us as equals to the
males. They've never done anything to
make us feel uncomfortable."

Palestinian leader Yassir Arafat salutes a navy honor guard on his arrival in Gaza
City yesterday after his meeting with Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak and U.S.
Secretary of State Warren Christopher on Monday.

Jordan and undertook serious talks with
Syria over terms of an agreement to
include the return of Syria's Golan
Heights, captured by Israel in 1967.
But relations between Arab countries
and Israel have nose-dived since the
election in May of Israel's new right-
wing government, led by Prime
Minister Benjamin Netanyahu. Syria
and Israel are no longer talking. Israeli-
Palestinian negotiations are stalled.
Even moderate Arab countries are call-
ing for the suspension of moves to "nor-
malize" relations with Israel.
The United States has promoted the
annual meeting taking place here to the
belief that greater economic interde-
pendence will lead to greater political
stability in the region. Under pressure
from the Egyptian public, which is

deeply suspicious of Israel, Egyptian
President Hosni Mubarak initially
threatened to cancel the conference,
then relented under pressure from the
United States. Other Arab states have
downgraded their political representa-
tion, sending trade officials instead of
foreign ministers. Jordan's King
Hussein stayed home.
That is not to say that the meeting is
a failure. U.S. officials noted yesterday
that 1,500 business people, including
260 from the United States, are attend-
ing -400 more than last year. The high
attendance reflects improving invest-
ment prospects in countries such as
Egypt, which is restructuring its econo-
my in line with the free-market pre-
scriptions of the World Bank and
International Monetary Fund.

LAWSUIT
Continued from Page 12
case for the Supreme Court.
"None of the other (copyshops) had
the guts to fight," Smith said. "As far as
Kinko's, they're just scared to death."
Laura McKormick, director of public
relations for Kinko's, said that while her
company's main objective is to take
care of its customers, part of that
responsibility requires the store to pay
royalties on copyrighted material.
"The law provides the copyright
holder the exclusive right to reproduce
or permit someone else to reproduce
copyrighted material," McKormick
said.
Association of American Publishers
President Nicholas Veliotes said in a
written statement that the court's deci-
sion on Friday should send a strong
message to college and university
coursepack providers nationwide.
"The decision not only reiterates the
important lesson that compliance with
the copyright law is for everyone, but it
will also specifically strengthen aware-
ness of the need to comply with the law
within the educational community,"
Veliotes said in the statement.
Smith's competitors in Ann Arbor

said they continuously work to obtain
permission to reproduce significant
portions of copyrighted material into
courspacks.
"We would love it if we didn't have to
get permission," said Stacy Collick,
Dollar Bill Copying team leader. "But
with new technology, such as the
Internet, we can sometimes get clear-
ance instantly.
"(Smith) hasn't gotten permission so
he doesn't know how long it takes,"
Collick said.
Nelson wrote in his 6th Circuit
Court opinion, "Mr. Smith has been
something of a crusader against the
system under which his competitors
have been paying agreed royalties, or
'permission fees' as they are known
in the trade."
History Prof. Victor Lieberman, who
participated in a deposition before the
February hearing, said he can see both
viewpoints.
"It's very hard for teachers to get out-
of-print material," Lieberman said.
"I'm willing to support Michigan
Document Services from the standpoint
of teaching:'
Kathy Eshelman, president of Grade-
A-Notes, another local copyshop,
agreed with Dollar Bill's position.
"We don't feel like it's a burden to

uphold the law," Eshelman said. "We're
working quickly. We get immediate
approval of 80 percent of material for
college classes.
"If a professor submits the material
two weeks before class, I can easily
have it on the shelf the first day of
class," she said.
Smith's philosophy is that not paying
royalties to publishers greatly lowers
the often high cost of coursepacks and
is attractive to students, he said.
"Five hundred students and 150 fac-
ulty members supported testimony in
our case," Smith said.
However, some students disagreed
with Smith's position.
"If (MDS) is not paying the publish-
ers, then that's wrong," said Business
junior Amy Burke.
The appeal is likely to be heard by
the Supreme Court, said Law Prof.
Rebecca Eisenberg.
"I hope we'll get some clarification
from the Supreme Court," Eisenberg
said. "I certainly think this is a pressing
issue - it has made professors reluc-
tant to use coursepacks."
In response to Smith's claim that it is
too tedious to obtain permission, and
drives up costs for students, Eshelman
said, "I haven't found it to be the burden
(Smith) has."

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