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October 15, 1996 - Image 5

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1996-10-15

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LOCAL/STATE

The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, October 15, 1996 -- 5

fDUCATION
tinued from Page 1
During Campaign '96, officals from
both parties have been traveling the
country and targeting younger voters,
promising that their party has the better
plan for higher education.
The Rev. Jesse Jackson, a one-time
Democratic candidate for president
who recently stumped in Michigan, is
orking to increase the number of
jounger voters.
Jackson spoke out strongly about the
need for increased student aid. He said
,4overnment funding of education is
*Very necessary. "It's a good subsidy; it
'bears good fruit;' he said.
Democrats believe the current sys-
tem is not sufficient, Jackson said. He
said the Democratic party will offer
more hope to students.
"Many qualifiable youth are denied
,portunity for lack of aid," Jackson
said. "Therefore,
.there must be
much more
investment in O®ppo
Universities."'
Hills said Dole scholars
also wants to actuall
make better edu
cational opportu-. to help n
aties available
ore Americans. people
He said Dole
really under- cities."
stands the need
for federal edu-
cational support, Director of
because Dole forf
benefitted from fr___
the GI Bill him-
self.
"(What Dole would) like to see is
at GI Bill extended down below the
ollege level," Hills said.
Clinton, Dole and their individual
supporters have outlined their respec-
tive plans for higher education to
Michigan voters during the past
month.
Hills said Dole's proposed "opportu-
nity scholarships" are a major part of
Dole's concrete plan to improve educa-
tion. The scholarships would provide
iovernment vouchers for education
ranging from kindergarten through col-
lege.
Republicans say the opportunity
scholarships will help significantly
more students than the current system
does.
"Opportunity scholarships actually
are going to help more people in the
inner cities," Hills said. "It's not for the
rich, white Republicans living in the
Jsburbs."
Dole said his proposed 15-percent
across-the-board tax cut will help peo-
pie save for college and boost the econ-
omy.
Dodd cited a number of "pro-
active, positive things" the Clinton
administration has done for higher
education as reasons to vote for
Democrats.
COURT
Continued from Page 1
said.
Rowe said "there's almost no way to
predict" what will take place in court
today.
"More than likely it will be lawyers
arguing, the judge asking questions,"
Rowe said
Lowenstein speculated that Morris
,Wight excuse herself from the hearing
cause Morris's sister, Judy Kuipers, is
chancellor for the University of
Wisconsin at Lacrosse, and may be on
the list of 300 candidates considered for

University president.
Regents and members of the
Presidential Search Advisory
Committee contacted for this article
declined comment.
- Daily Staff Reporter Jodi S. Cohen
contributed to this report.

Sri
.N

AmeriCorps is one of those things,
Dodd said. The program, created by
Clinton, involvespstudents providing
community service in this country like
Peace Corps volunteers do abroad. In
return, students receive money toward
payment of their college loans.
Dodd said 25,000 college students
per year in the last two-and-a-half years
have joined AmeriCorps. They are
receiving, on average, $4,720 for col-
lege as a result of that experience.
The Direct Lending program is
another Clinton effort for higher educa-
tion, Dodd said. He said Democrats
pushed for the elimination of banks in
the lending program, thus allowing
schools to provide direct lending. There
are about 1,750 colleges participating
in the direct program.
Dodd said Republicans, including
Dole, were vehemently opposed to the
implementation of the program.
Clinton's "hope scholarships" will
help even more
students, Dodd
.i/fsaid. The pro-
,Y posed scholar-
ships would
give a $1,500
per-year ostax
ore dents who
maintain at
the inner least a B aver-
age during their
first two years
of college.
- Rusty Hills "That means
)ubliC relations two additional
o.John Engler years beyond
V. J Ethe 12th grade
would be
tuition-free at
the community college levelDodd
said.
Democrats are also proposing a
$10,000 per-year tax deduction to help
students and families defer the cost of
higher education.
Dodd said Dole will not support such
programs or tax cuts.
"The Republicans are trying to
destroy AmeriCorps, they are trying to
cut back and destroy the Direct
Lending Program, and we are not see-
ing much support for tax deductions
and higher education needs," Dodd
said.
Engler said Republicans have a
strong education record of their own. "I
can point to a record where we have
dramatically increased higher educa-
tion funding," he said.
He cited his own increase in funding
to Michigan universities as one demon-
stration of Republican commitment to
higher education.
Engler said Republicans have made it
easier for students to gain university
credit before actually getting to college.
He said his party proposes an apprentice
tax credit - a credit for trade schools.
Republicans are stronger on making
sure students coming directly out of
college are better positioned in the job
market, Engler said.
STUDY
SYRACUSE

ABROAD
IN
HONG KONG
STUDY-TRAVEL
IN CHINA
BUSINESS &
LIBERAL ARTS
COURSES
GENEROUS
GRANTS &
SCHOLARSHIPS
STUDY
IN ENGLISH

LANSING (AP) - A woman who
underwent a late-term abortion after
learning her fetus had no chance of sur-
viving is the focus of an advertising
campaign announced yesterday in
Lansing by abortion rights groups.
The ad, sponsored by the Pro-Choice
Public Education Project, is part of a
$250,000 advertising campaign in
seven regions across the country,
including Lansing.

Marilyn Hysen, Lansing project
leader, said the project cannot hope to
match spending by anti-abortion
groups but will try to counter their
emotional pitch with facts about abor-
tion.
"All you've seen is the images that
they've put out, which have been hor-
rendous," she said, referring to ads con-
demning late-term abortions.
One of the pro-choice group's 30-

second television ads features a
California woman, Claudia Ades, and
her husband, Richard. Mrs. Ades
underwent a late-term abortion of the
type Congress recently sought to
restrict. She said her fetus had a fatal
chromosomal disorder called trisomy-
13.
"My health and my ability to have
another child were in danger,"she says
in the ad.

Mrs. Ades also says millions of peo-
ple worry about having healthy babies
and the dangers of problem pregnan-
cies. She urges viewers, "Don't let
them take away your doctor's ability to
give you the care you need."
The second ad features a young
woman and a young man jogging and
discussing Congress' efforts to limit
abortion and cut funding for family
planning.

I I

Practicing Pharm.D.'s discuss
for
Doctor of Pharmacy Graduates
A U-M College of Pharmacy seminar
open to all students
Ibesday, October 15 7-9 p.m.
1544 C.C. Little Building
(corner of Church & Geddes)
REFRESHMENTS SERVED

G RADUATE PSYCHOLOGY If you would like to achieve
programs generally require your maximum potential score,
that you take both the General we offer a program of systematic
GRE and the Psychology Subject instruction featuring a series of
Test, an extensive examination of live class lectures, home-study
the entire field of Psychology. notes, extensive practice with
These test questions examine many exams, and individual help
the depth obtained from one and guidance.aClasses are taught
course beyond intro psych in the by an instructor with more than
areas of Physiological, Sensation, 15 years of experience (& who also
Perception, Comparative, Social, has scored in the 99th percentie).
Learning, Classical Conditioning, All important topics discussed,
Developmental, Cognitive, Per- with an emphasis on Perception,
sonality, Abnormal, History & Comparative, Physio, Learning,
Systems, Tests & Measurements, Experimental, Stats, and History.
Research Design and Statistics. Class begins: Wed., Oct. 23rd.
CEL Test Preparation 1100 South University 996-1500

Pro-choice ad campaign targets Lansing

I

Our actuaries are used to
beiong called names.
Like C.E.O., for example.
CIGNA's C.E.O., started in the Actuarial Executive
Development Program, as did many of our Financial
Managers and Divisional Financial Officers. If you like
those kind of names, talk to our Director.
On campus:

CIGNA
A Business of Caring.
Internet Address:
httf)://www.cigna.corm

Date:
Time:

October 16, 1996
7:30 - 9:30 p.m.

L ocation: Michigan League, Kalamazoo Room
We're an equal opportunity employer. M/F/D/V
"CIGNA" refers to C/GNA and/or one or more of its subsidiaries.
Most employees are employed by subsidiaries of CIGNA Corporation, which
provide insurance and related products.

Goldman Sachs Co.
invites University of Michigan undergraduates to explore the many
opportunities for professional growth within the firm.
Monday, October 21, 1996
Opportunities in the
Investment Banking Division
4:30 p.m., Open House
6:00 p.m., Presentation
The Michigan Union, The Ballroom
Casual Attire
Monday, November 18, 1996
Opportunities in the
Information Technology Department
6:30 p.m., EECS Building
Casual Attire

Nkkk I

U-

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