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September 19, 1996 - Image 11

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1996-09-19

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Scoreboard AMERICAN LEAGUE
NATIONAL LEAGUE MILWAUKEE 2, Toronto 1
ATLANTA 6, Houston 2 Boston 4, DETROIT 0
COLORADO 6, Los Angeles 4 NEW YORK 3, Balitmore 2
San Diego 8, San Francisco 5 Cleveland at CHICAGO, inc.
MONTREAL 4, New York 3 Minnesota at KANSAS CITY, inc.
PITTSBURGH 5, Cincinnati 3 Oakland at CALIFORNIA, inc..
Florida at PHILADELPHIA, inc. Texas at SEATTLE, inc.
Cticago at ST. LOUIS, inc. Home games in CAPS

11A

Thursday
September 19, 1996

4
ro V
R ~ ',

Confident Michigan
spikers race into
weekend matches

Big

Ten

tourney if
the works

By JJ. SerapIgla
For the Daily
The Michigan women's volleyball
team will continue its quest for
respect and redemption when it takes
on Notre Dame and Eastern
Michigan this weekend at Cliff Keen
Arena.
The Wolverines grabbed two of
*ree matches at the Spikeoff
Spokane Tournament and hope that
their up-tempo play of late will con-
tinue.
Sparked by Shareen Luze's
defense, Karen Chase's power hitting
and Linnea Mendoza's assists, the
Wolverines look to reach the .500
mark.
"This team is a pleasure to coach,"
Michigan coach Greg Giovanazzi
"aid. "The players have been
sponding to what has been asked
of them."
But things were not so enjoyable a
couple of weeks ago.
The Wolverines dropped their first
four games of "
the season and it' bb
looked more Ever
like the Detroit
Red Wings in George I
e playoffs than
team that
expected itself
to legitimately- upwai d 1
compete for the
Big Ten title.
The problem
was ineffective
performances teppi
as the
Wolverines tat
n slayed up to but
id not over- the tat:
whelm their
opponents. -
Gi.ovanazzi Michigan
was able to hold
the Wolverines
together, howev-
er, and it has been smooth sailing
ever since.
Since their early season jitters, the
olverines have managed to win
fouri of five and vault themselves
intolthe Big Ten title picture with a
4-5 overall record.
"Ever since George Mason (which
beat Michigan in three sets last
Saturday), we have had an upward
swing in confidence," Giovanazzi
said.
"Our players are stepping up, and
that is showing in the stats."
The team's schedule also had
omething to do with that upward

swing.
"We played four teams (at the
beginning of the season) that were
top 15 teams," Giovanazzi said.
"Now we have been playing teams
that actually do make some mis-
takes."
But now Michigan takes on one of
those "mistake-free" teams in Notre
Dame.
The Irish have lost only six times
under coach Debbie Brown.
Giovanazzi is confident, however,
that the Wolverines will be able to
step up to the task.
"(Michigan's) Sarah Jackson has
come into her own, and Mendoza has
a good grasp of the offense's game
plan," Giovanazzi said.
Both Jackson and Mendoza will
have to have good games if the team
is to win.
Michigan is also receiving some
Irish luck. Notre Dame comes to
Ann Arbor a banged-up team..
Injuries to starters Carey May and
Kristina Ervin
have caused
ince major shake-
ups to the
fason, We Notre Dame
lineup.
But the
Wolverines
wing in know full well

), .
t, t

By Will McCahill

Daily Sports Writer
Come 1998, March Madness just might get a little crazier.,'
According to a report in yesterday's editions of The Ann
Arbor News, the Big Ten is set to conduct an end-of-season
men's basketball tournament as soon as March 1998.
A committee has been appointed by Big Ten presidents and
chancellors to study the feasibility of such a tournament,
according to associate Big Ten commissioner Mark Rudner.
Although the News reported that the committee is expected
to recommend instituting a tournament, Rudner said the
group's report is still "under construction" and will not be pre-
sented to university presidents and chancellors until
December.
"We're focusing on the academic, financial and competitivZ
impact of a tournament," Rudner said
Although many of the conference's coaches have oppose4..
such a move in the past, that situation has apparently changd.1
"It has gone from almost a unanimous 'no' to now givipg,
(Big Ten commissioner) Jim Delany the go-ahead to look into
it," Michigan head coach Steve Fisher told the News yesterda2.4
That opinion was echoed by Rudner.
"It's not unanimous, but there is more support (amon
coaches) than in the past," he said.
Rudner said the idea of a Big Ten tournament is not a ne
one, by any stretch.
"The issue comes up pretty regularly (at various meetingsre
Rudner said.
There are several possible stumbling blocks to organizi'
such a tournament. The academic impact upon the athlete
involved is one such concern, while scheduling may also be
factor.
Some sort of special format would have to be implement$
in order to allow all lI conference teams to participate in th(
tourney.
Also an issue is the potential financial bonanza a tourna,
ment could bring to the Big Ten.
Rudner refused to speculate on the monetary possibiliti
inherent in a post-season tournament, adding that such an iss
is up to the heads of the 11 universities.

e
s

ice. Our
are
~up, and
,howin1g in
Greg Giovanazzi
volleyball coach

that injuries
will not keep
Notre Dame
from attack-
ing.
Tomorrow
night's game
is an impor-
tant test for
Michigan, for
it will show
G i ovan azzi
just how far
his team has
come.
seem, Giovanazzi

FILE PHOTO/Daily
Michigan basketball player Louis Bullock may have the opportunity to play in a postseason Big Ten tour-
nament before he graduates. The Big Ten is set to conduct a conference tournament at the end of the
regular season as soon as March 1998. Right now, the only postseason action the Big Ten looks for-
ward to in March is the NCAA and NIT tournaments. A Big Ten tournament would put the conference on
pace with most of the other conferences which have postseason tournaments.

Funny as it may

is more concerned about a possible
letdown against Saturday's oppo-
nent, Eastern Michigan.
"We play a tough game against the
Irish (tomorrow night)," Giovanazzi
said.
"Then the next night, we play a
lesser team in Eastern Michigan.
"We have to play solid games,
both nights."
This weekend is the last preseason
tournament the Wolverines will com-
pete in before opening up conference
play against lowa and Illinois next
week.

women'
By Nancy Berger
Daily Sports Writer
It is easy for Michigan women's golf
coach Kathy Teichert to tell her players
what they need to do in order to have a
strong showing at this weekend's Lady
Northern Invitational in East Lansing.
"Our top two players need to be in the
70s, probably three in the 70s," Teichert
said. "We need a couple in the 80s, and
our sixth player can't average more than
82 strokes per round."
For those who don't play competitive
golf, this may sound like a reasonable
game plan.
The Wolverines will be the first to

tell you that playing competitive golf is
easier said than done, especially at the
collegiate level.
For sophomore Sharon Park, concen-
trating on both golf and school work
can have a profound effect on your per-
formance on the greens.
"I am used to playing college golf
this year" Park said. "I know that I am
a good player and that I can play better
than last year. It is just frustrating,
because I don't have the time to focus
on the game because of school."
Park made her collegiate debut at last
year's 54-hole Spartan Invitational and
placed fifth overall after recording a
78.3 average. Her average was one

golf tees off in weekend tournef

stroke off second-place finisher
Shannon McDonald, who now works
under Teichert as the undergraduate
assistant coach.
While Park tied for I1th with an
80.50 average at last week's Wolverine
Invitational, she is looking to average a
75 for all three rounds this weekend.
One intangible that could help both
Teichert and Park in obtaining success
this weekend is the weather. The weath-
er was an obtrusive guest at last week's
tournament and was integral to the out-
come of the tournament.
The Wolverines hope that the weath-
er, as well as the strong invitational
field, won't get the best of them this

weekend.
The tournament hosts 15 teaml,
including all 11 conference tearts.
Missouri, Iowa State, Illinois State q'd
Northern Illinois round out the field'
The outcome of this tournament wol
determine the pairings when Michigan
State hosts the Big Ten championships
this spring.
The Wolverines placed third in the
tournament, but Teichert doesn't fore-
see a possible improvement over last
year's finish.
"I don't see that winning is a realistic
chance this year,' Teichert said. "I am
See GOLF, Page 13A

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