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March 07, 1995 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 1995-03-07

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The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, March 7, 1995-7

Detroit Compact gives urban
kids a chance to go to college

AA CRUISE SHIPS HIRING! Earn big $+ FREE FINANCIAL AID! Over $6 billion in SUMMER CAMP COUNSELORS to work
free world travel (Caribbean, Europe, Hawaii, private sector grants & scholarships is now one on one with children with special needs.
etc.) Summer/permanent, no exp. nec. Guide. available. All students are eligible regardless Campers are integrated into groups with typi-
919/929-4398 ext. C 1014. of grades, income, or parent's income. Let us cally developing peers in day and overnight
AA CRUISE SHIPS HIRING! Ear big $$ h . Call Student Financial Services: 1-800- cam psettings. Dave Gendel at Keshet at
+ free travell (Caribbean, Europe, etcl No -6495 ext. F55985. 7?805-0274 for application.

xp nec. Staff needed for busy holiday/
ring/summer seasons. Guaranteed successl
uide 919/929-4398 ext. C3035.
ACTIVISTS WANTED for social change &
environmental justice. Canvass for
Greenpeace. Call Chuck at 761-1996.
ADVERTISING JOBS- Gain valuable busi-
ness experience by selling advertising to lo-
cal and national businesses. Earn commis-
sion-based pay. Become an Account Execu-
tive for The Michigan Daily Display Staff.
Now hiring for Spring/Summer and Fall/
Winter terms. Pick up an application at the
Student Publications Building, 420 Maynard,
in the Senior Staff Office. Application dead-
re extended until March 10, 1995.
ADVERTISING/MARKETING Asst. Part/
full-time, $6-$7 hr. Organizational, creative,
design, & computer skills a plus. Students
welcome. Send resume: Video Watch, 836
Phoenix Dr., Ann Arbor, MI 48108. Attn:
Advertising Dept.
ALASKA EMPLOYMENT - Students
needed! Fishing industry. Earn up to $3,000-
$6,000+ per month. Room and board!
Transportation! Male or Female. No ex-
perience necessary. Call 206/545-4155 ext.
A55982.
, LASKA JOBS! Students needed: fisheries,
rks & resorts. Earn up to $3-$6k/mo.l Call
EI 919/490-8629, ext. A19.
ANIMAL SHELTER WORKER Im-
mediate opening for committed, hardworking
individuals full & part-time positions
available, $6/hr. Apply at Humane Society of
Huron Valley, 3100 Cherry Hill Rd. Ann
Arbor. EOE.
AUTO CAD R12 experience with minimum
1 yr. architectural drawing. Send/fax resume
to Video Watch, 836 Phoenix Dr., Ann
Arbor, MI 48108. (677-7862 fax) Attn:
Roger.
AMP COUNSELORS - OUTSTANDING
IM DOWN CAMPS: Tennis, Dance,
limnastics, WSI, Athletics, Nutrition
Dietetics. Age 20+. Seven weeks. CAMP
CAMELOT on College Cam puses at
MASSACHUSETTS, PENNSYLVANIA,
CALIFORNIA. Contact: Michele Friedman,
947 Hewlett Drive, North Wookmere, N.Y.
11581. 800/421-4321.
CAMP TACONIC: Prestigious coed Mas-
sachusetts camp hiring motivated, team-
oriented undergrads and grads. Live with
kids and instruct in: Swimming, Waterskiing,
Sailing, Windsurfing, Tennis, Team/In-
vidual Sports, Rollerblading/Hockey,
'chery, Golf, Fitness, Ropes/Camping, Sil-
ver Jewelry, Arts/Crafts, Photography,
Newspaper, Video, Musical Theatre, Dance,
Science/Rocketry. Rewarding, enjoyable
work! 800/762-2820.
CHALLENGING ASSIGNMENTS, mgmt.
exT. If this describes you, this unique
training opportunity will teach you to take
charge & get well reward for the effort. 810/
545-8888.
CHILD CARE-Responsible non-smoker
with car needed for 10-15 hrs./wk. Call
before 6:00 p.m. 663-3223.

GRAPHIC ARTIST/PHOTOGRAPHER
To design the cover of the 1995-1996
Student Directory. Must be able to work
through mid-May. Great addition to your
portfolio. Stop by Student Publications Bldg.
at 420 Maynard (second floor) and ask for
Nancy, or call 764-0431.

SUMMER JOBS FOR THE
ENVIRONMENT
Earn $2500-$3500 & Free the Planet
Campaign to save endangered species
promote recycling & stop polluters. Work
with environmental groups like PIRGs,
Sierra club & Green Corps. Positions in 33
states & D.C. Campus Interviews: March
7, 8 & 9. Call Jamie: 1-800/75-EARTH.
SUMMER POSITIONS Student Sprinklers
now has openings in M, OH, IN. Get real ex-
rience running your own business and earn
0,000 plus. Must have own car. Call
immediately. 800/265-7691.

GREAT SUMMER WORK!
Macomb/Oakland counties
Paint at $6-7/hr. Call Frank 764-9794.

HELPERS NEEDED to run the Arbor
train for the Easter season. Run train M
18 - April 15. Please apply at Arbor
Mall, Management Office located in lo
level Mon.-Fri. 10-4.

land
arch

land TRAVEL ABROAD and work. Make up to
ewer $2,400-$4,0/0+/mo. teaching basic conver-
sational English in Japan, Taiwan, or S.
Korea. No teaching background or Asian lan-
guages required. For information call: 206/
632-1146 ext. J55986.

96U ,o a
SUMMER JOBS
Cedar Point has 3,500 summer jobs
available for 1995.
Housing available for those 18 & older.
Earn up to $5.30 an hour.
Interviews will be held at:
Univosily 01 Michigan
Tuesday, March 7
"Job Fair"
No appointment necessary. For more
information, call (419) 627-2245. EOE
SANOUSKY OHIO
AMUSEMENT PA KIRISORT
IF YOU ENJOY being outdoors then this
summer job is for you. Good hours. Good
pay. Only a few open positions in Detroit &
A2. 810/545-8888.
IF YOU LIKE making big $ & can only
work part-time, call now. Earn & learn.
Few positions - Detroit & A2 areas.
810/545-8888.
INNOVATIVE ANN ARBOR company
seeks student intern interested in customer
service and service-quality consulting. Posi-
tion includes hands-on involvement with
client program development. Applicants must
possess excellent written and verbal com-
munication skills. Proficiency with Microsoft
Word is required. Part time position available
immediately, increased summer hours.
Business, marketing, communications and re-
lated majors preferred. Send resume to:
Second to None, Inc. P.O. Box 4360, Ann
Arbor, MI 48106.
INTERESTED IN working with children?
Be a day camp counselor. Students, teachers.
Program is child-centered, non-competitive.
Tran on provided, Chicago & northern
subu. 5- 00,Circle MDay Camp,
Wheeling, IL 60090.
LEGAL SECRETARY - Law firm seeks
full-time secretary. Strong Word Perfect &
language skills & accurate typing of 55 wpm
required. Health plan. Bring resume to Bar-
nett and Rich PC, 415 Detroit St., Ann Arbor,
48104.
MACKINAC ISLAND RESORT Hotel
seeking summer and seasonal staff-front
desk, night audit, security, dining room,
kitchen, bicycle mechanic and housekeeig.
Contact the Iroquois Hotel Winter Office,
995-0317.

WANTED 100 STUDENTS lose 8 -100 lbs.
New metabolism breakthrough. Guaranteed
results! I lost 15 lbs. in 3 wks. RN assisted. 1-
800/579-1634. $35 charge.
WANTED: GRAPHIC Illustrater for Med.
School Lab. Should be adept at line art using
MAC,arUnix-based drawing programs. Exp.
with Framemaker 4.0 is desirable but
creativity will compensate for learning
curves. 20 hrs./wk., $7.50/hr. Contact: Sari
Failer @ 763-6150-
WORK-STUDY POSITION. $7/hr. En-
gineering tech for chemistry instrument
shop. Possibility of full-time summer
employment. Job number 0969. For more
information call 764-7363
BLACK CROWS TIX for sale. March 28 at
the Fox Theater. Main floor & balcony
available. Call Peter or ED: 213-0859.
BLACK CROWES tickets, March 12,28, &
29.. Call John at 213-1271.
I'VE GOT A FAST CAR...Now I just need
the tix. for Tracy Chapman tonight! Call
Dara- 930-0174.
LOW FARES TO EUROPE * ASIA *
AUSTRALIA * AFRICA * SOUTH
AMERICA
Call STAMOS TRAVEL in Kerrytown,
downtown Ann Arbor, 407 N. Fifth Ave.,
Ann Arbor, MI at 663-4400. Special U-M
line 663-5500.
LOW FARES! London from $379, Paris
from $528, Frankfurt from $504, Japan from
$740, Korea from $750, Bangkok from $867,
Singapore from $982. Regency Travel 209 S.
State St. 665-6122.
NEED 2 TIX for Live concert @ Hill. Call
Allison at 741-8135.
ROMANTIC SPRING HIDEAWAY.
Romantic log cabins on lake. $49-$69
nightly. Reduced mid-week rate incl. hot tub,
boats, canoes, more. Traverse City area. 616/
276-9502.
STUDENTS ANYWHERE in the U.S. on
Continental $159 or $239. Bring your Con-
tinental voucher & AMEX card. Martha at
Regency Travel, 209S. State, 665-6122.
HERB DAVID GUITAR Studio 302 E.
Liberty, 665-8001. Lessons lessons lessons.
Repair repair repair. Not just guitar.
DRINKING TOO MUCH? DrinkWise -
Healthy choices for people who drink.
Moderation or abstinence - you decide. A
service of U-M Med. Center. 747-9473.
ERIC'S SPORTS: Team uniforms and shoes
for all indoor sports. 2 blocks off State Street.
Call 663-6771.
YOGA CLASS 6 Tues. evenings 7:30 to 9
p.m. starts Mar. 7. 761-6520.
Meditation workshop Mar. 11 9:00-12 p.m.
761-6520.
9 od& enterain.

By Patience Atkin
Daily Staff Reporter
Many students in Detroit's public
schools see a college education as a
desirable, yet unattainable goal.
But in 1988, a group of educators
and businesspeople put their resources
together to form Detroit Compact, a
program designed to keep those stu-
dents on track for college.
Established as a joint venture be-
tween the Detroit Chamber of Com-
merce and the Detroit Public School
System, Detroit Compact provides
incentives for students' attendance and
academic performance.
A small but dedicated group of
University students volunteers its tu-
toring services to high school stu-
dents enrolled in the program. Some
of the high school students later re-
ceive scholarships from the Univer-
sity.
Students in participating middle
and high schools are given a set of
requirements they must meet in order
to receive the incentives offered by
their school.
The requirements include a 95-
percent attendance rate and a 97-per-
cent "on-time" rate. Students must
also maintain a 2.0 grade-point aver-
age and place at or above the 40th
percentile on the reading and math
sections of the California Achieve-
ment Test.
Incentives vary from school to
school.
"Murray-Wright (High School)
has 'Attendo' - if a student achieves
perfect attendance over a period of

time, that student can receive a $25
cash prize," said Blandina Rose, ex-
ecutive director of Detroit Compact.
Other incentives include skating
and pizza parties, along with gift cer-
tificates from businesses like
McDonald's and Foot Locker.
"It's kind of bad that you have to
use these kinds of incentives," said
Nicola Singel, Detroit Compact
spokeswoman. "But you can use them
to help students understand the value
of an education at their level."
Coordinators say the prizes are
not the only incentives.
"Probably the biggest (incentive)
is the promise of a job or the promise
of college support," Rose said.
Local businesses contract with
Detroit Compact to offer temporary
employment to students who meet the
terms of the compact. These "on-tar-
get" students are guaranteed summer
jobs in places like the Detroit Medical
Center.
By meeting an additional set of
requirements, on-target students can
qualify for scholarships at 32 partici-
pating colleges and universities.
Students must maintain a 3.0 GPA,
achieve at least a 21 on the ACT and
meet all of the basic requirements to
be considered for the scholarships.
Rose said that 11 in-state colleges,
including the University, and four
historically Black colleges outside
Michigan are among the participating
schools.
John Matlock, director of minor-
ity affairs for the University, said the
University usually gives "somewhere

in the area of 15" scholarships to
qualifying Detroit Compact students
each year.
Compact staff and volunteers are
committed to helping students stay on
target.
"If the students fall off target, they
are helped," Singel said. "If they're
not getting to school on time, the high
school coordinators try to rearrange
their classes so they have classes later
in the day."
Students at Murray-Wright have
the added benefit of student mentors.
The StudentEducationPeerProgram,
or STEPP, is run by a group of Uni-
versity students who tutor at Murray-
Wright once a week.
"The program is for all Murray-
Wright students but the majority of
students are 'compacted,'" said
Cherlon Ussery, an LSA senior.and
STEPP president.
STEPP's goals include helping
students maintain their GPAs and
achieving high scores on standard-
ized college admission exams, Ussery
said.
The mentor program goes deeper
than numbers, though.
"The idea was that we would pair
a (participating high school) fresh-
man with a college freshman and they
would work together for the four
years," said Elise Pressma, an LSA
senior and one of the founders of
STEPP.
"We wanted to show them what
college could be like," Pressma said.
"We're making them feel like it's pos-
sible to go on to a higher education."

Candidate Gramm visits Mich.

BURGER KING
1214 S. UNIVERSITY
NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS
WE OFFER:
* UP TO $6.00 STARTING PAY
FREE MEALS AFTER 30 DAYS
AND MANY OTHER BENEFITS
INCLUDING:
College Students $150
How does it work?
1. Be interviewed and hired by the restaurant
manager to fill the openings we may have.
2. High School seniors:
A. Be employed at least 6 months prior to
attending college or business school.
B. Work a minimum of 15 hours per week.
3 College Students: A. Work at least 15 hours
per week during the semester.
4. Maintain an above average performance rating.
5. Present dated receipts for textbooks and
course schedule to the restaurant manager for
reimbursement at the end of the semester.
6. Reimbursement will be made at the end of the
appropriate semester. You will be reimbursed
up to $150 for the actual cost of your books.
Learn while you earn - A tremendous
opportunity to make some money, gain
practical business experience, explore
opportunities and get reimbursed up to
$150.00 each semester for the
cost of your books.

LANSING (AP) - Republican
presidential hopeful Phil Gramm
looked at the calendar, discovered it
was March and decided he'd better
head to Michigan for its March 19
presidential primary.
So what if the primary isn't until
1996?
"Since I understand that the prin-
cipal part of the task of getting thisjob
is carrying Michigan in both the pri-
mary and the general election, I
thought I ought to get an early start
with that task," he said.
Gramm held brief news confer-
ences in Detroit, Lansing and Grand
Rapids, where he attended the Kent
County Lincoln Day Dinner.
The Texas senator also paid a cour-
tesy call to Michigan Gov. John
Engler. He insisted he would not use
the meeting to ask for Engler's en-
dorsement or to discuss a spot on the
GOP ticket for Engler.
"I just don't think it's appropriate
for me, when I haven't won a single
delegate, to be talking about who I'm

going to pick as vice president," he
said.
While Gramm praised Engler, he
jabbed at Senate Majority Leader Bob
Dole of Kansask
for saying Engler
was on his list of
vice presidential
picks.
"If Bob Dole
had as many del-
egates as he has
people on his short
list for vice presi-
dent, he would al- Gramm
ready have the
nomination won," he said.
Gramm disputed Dole's assess-
ment that the race for the GOP presi-
dential nomination could be over as
soon as the first two contests, in Iowa
and New Hampshire, are held.
It's more likely, he said, that the
nomination will be won on March 19,
when Michigan, Pennsylvania, Ohio
and Illinois hold their primaries.
"This is a marathon, not a sprint,"

he said, insisting he will remain a
candidate as long as primaries are
scheduled.
Gramm said he plans to release a
list of supporters in a few weeks,
which he said will include more than
half the state party's district chairs.
"But Iamaware that you don'tcarry
a great and important state like Michi-
gan by simply getting well-known
people to come out for you. You carry
it by coming back here, by getting to
know the people, by defining a vision
that they can believe in, and that's what
I intend to do," he said.
Gramm and Dole are part of a list
of contenders for the GOP presiden-
tial nomination that already includes
fellow Sens. Richard Lugar of Indi-
ana and Arlen Specter of Pennsylva-
nia, former Tennessee Gov. Lamar
Alexander, and conservative com-
mentator Pat Buchanan.
Gramm never mentioned Presi-
dent Clinton by name, saying only,
"The fellow that has the job now isn't
doing a very good job."

MAKE SUMMER MEMORIES...
At our prestigious Pocono Mountain, Pen-
nsylvania camp. We have openings for this
summer in the following areas: general
counselors; photography; tennis; computers;
ceramics; gymnastics; archery; dance; clim-
bingywall; challenge course facilitator;
volleyball; soccer, science & nature; WSI/
lifeguard; painting; riflery (NRA Certified);
basketball; baseball; softball; and horseback
riding instructors. Please contact Trail's End
Camp at: 1714 Wantagh Ave., Wantagh, NY
11793, or call us at 516/781-5200.
MARCH OPENINGS Need a Pt/Ft position.
$10.25 starting pay. Days, eves., & wknd.
avail. No exp. needed. Call 313-971-6122.
MATURE, NON-SMOKER needed for
babysitting. 2 school-age boys in my Saline
home, 15 min. from campus. 2-3 hrs. in mor-
nin#, starting 6:30 p.m. Pay $7/hr. More hours
avail. during summer. Call 429-8175 after 5
p.m.
NEEDED
College of Engineering needs person to meet,
greet, and direct prospective students and
visitors. Must be free Mon., Wed., Thurs. &
Fri. 12:45-1:45. Other hours flexible (up to
10/wk.) Temporary immediately through
mid-April. Please call 763-5050.
PA COED Children's overnight camp seeks
staff. Swim, crafts, radio, golf, nature, sailing,
tennis, sports, archery & general. Call 6101/
941-0128 or write Mark Glaser 16 Gum Tree
Lane Lafayette Hill, PA 19444.
PART-TIME computer technicalsupport,
Novell Netware & Hardware. MS-Access
knowledge a plus. Flexible hours. Call Tam-
my at 994-0003.
PART-TIME DENTAL assistant. Wednes-
days & Saturdays. $10-12/hr. 668-6612.
PERSONNEL NEEDED FOR security mid-
night and special events on campus. Flexible
sh uling. Will train full-time and part-time.
State Securities Services, Inc. 611 Church
St., suite 305, Ann Arbor, 668-0447. EOE.

U' study:* Black speech not disorder

TIOS SELLS TRINIDAD Habenero sauce.
Winner three years in a row as the best hot
sauce in North America. 333 E. Huron.

CLERICAL/TYPIST part/full-time, $6-$7
hr. Provide support to operations dept. Must
have following skills: typing, office
experience, responsible, accurate, dependable
and flexible. Send/fax resume: Video Watch,
836 Phoenix Dr., Ann Arbor, MI 48108.
Attn: Kathleen (677-7862 fax).
4,.RN $3,000- $5,000 per month in the
Maskan fishing industry. Call 616/897-9824
or send $39.95 check or money order to
Yuko Phillips, 10930 Sattlewood, Lowell, MI
49331.
EXCELLENT SUMMER mgmt. training
opportunity. Good communication skills re-
quired & basic computer skills helpful. 310/

PRACTICE REPRESENTATIVE
MEDICAL CODING SPECIALIST
FULL-TIME/PART-TIME positions
available in our Ann Arbor office. We are a
leader in Medical Billing, and we are looking
for those who are dedicated, meticulous and
quick thinking. Excellent communication &
business writing, skills along with a
knowledge of human anatomy a must.
Knowledge of Medical Billing .& Coding
help but not necessary (willing to train the
right person). WE OFFER GREAT PAY ($9/
hr. minimum) AND EXCELLENT
BENEFITS - WHAT CAN YOU OFFER?
We're only a 10 minute bus ride from the
Campus. Interested: fax your resume to 313/
677-7407 or send to PMG, Personnel

ADOFTIONT!larried couple unable to have
a baby. Wish to share love with infant. F.A.C.
agency aproved. Call Dale & Judy collect
ater 5. 517-695-6797.
ADOPTION. Mature, loving, married couple
seeks to adopt child soon. Will provide
loving care & excellent home &
environment. 800/585-7363.
DO YOU CONSIDER yourself creative,
open-minded, enthusiastic, an awesome com-
municator and possessing a dynamic
personality? Then WE WANT YOUI Ap-
plications now being accepted for Classified
Account Executives at The Michigan Daily.
Stop by the Student Pub. Bldg., 420 Maynard
or call 764-0557 now! EOE.
GIVE THE GIFT of life. Be an egg donor or
maternal surrogate for a childless couple. Ex-
cellentcompensation, $2500$17,000. 1-800/
308-7367.
DETROIT LIVEI
One-on-One/Voice Personals
1-313-976-3000
Wh pa morel Only 69e/min.
Alternative Lifestyles
Gay -BI- Couples - Swingers

By Vahe Tazian
Daily Staff Reporter
A study conducted by University
researchers found that urban Black
preschoolers use more complex syntax
than their non-urban African Ameri-
can peers who speak primarily stan-
dard English.
University researchers Julie A.
Washington and Holly K. Craig con-
ducted the study, with the support of
a $600,000 grant from the National
Institute of Health in Washington.
"I'm very surprised by the find-
ings," Washington said. The findings
emerged from a study of Detroit-area
schoolchildren.
"Our goal was to establish a clear
distinction between a speech disorder
and a dialect difference," said Wash-
ington, an assistant research scientist in
the speech and language pathology pro-
gram and a clinician at the Communi-
cative Disorders Clinic. "Itwas not our
goal to keep these children from using
the language."
According to the researchers, lan-
guage and speech disorders are esti-
mated to affect up to one out of every
10 members of racial or ethnic minor-
ity groups.
Washington and Craig, the director
of the University's Communicative
Disorders Clinic, studied 45 African

these findings need to be replicated
with a larger, more heterogeneous
sample.
"A lot of energy is still being spent
trying to convince some people that
Black English is a legitimate dialect,
not a symptom of low intelligence, low
education and low income," Washing-
ton said.
The researchers are currently work-
ing with public schools in Oak Park,
Mich., where teachers and administra-
tors have expressed concern that Afri-

can American children have been inap-
propriately placed in special education
programs.
"Many kids are placed in special
classes because they are believed to
have speech problems, but they are
really speaking a different dialect,"
Washington said.
Washington and Craig hope to
develop a screening instrument to
help teachers distinguish between
speech problems and dialect differ-
ences.

m

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