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February 01, 1995 - Image 2

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1995-02-01

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2 - The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, February 1, 1995

CLINTON
Continued from page 1
House Republicans are expected to
propose similar legislation after the first
100 days of this Congress, said an aide
to Rep. Dick Chrysler (R-Brighton).
Chrysler is expected to be a significant
player; he made education deductions a
central campaign issue.
Joe McMonigle, press secretary
for Sen. Spencer Abraham (R-Au-
burn Hills) called the Clinton pro-
posal "an admirable effort."
However, Abraham opposes the
specifics in Clinton's proposal because

it does not cover all middle-class fami-
lies, McMonigle asserted. "What Sen.
Abraham believes is that a tax cut for all
Americans would be beneficial, espe-
cially the working class families of
Michigan," McMonigle said.
Abraham supports a $500 tax cut
per child, raising the personal exemp-
tion, and a capital-gains tax cut.
However, Education advisor
McLaughlin called this a weak argu-
ment. She asserted that all middle-
class families would be helped by
increasing the tax-deductible contri-
bution to Individual Retirement Ac-
counts up to $100,000.

Mark Fletcher, president of the
College Republicans, said the Clinton
proposal's principles sound good. "I
think the Republican Party will con-
sider that. It definitely should be con-
sidered in debate," he said. "The Re-
publican Party definitely stands for
tax deductions."
The College Democrats support
Clinton's proposal, said co-chair Mike
Pokrywka. "We support any programs
that help middle-class families afford
education," he said.
"Any attempt by the Republicans
to destroy the current student loan
process or dismantle the President's

AmeriCorps program - we'll re-
spond to that and fight to save those
programs," Pokrywka added.
Republicans have criticized the
President for waiting two years to
propose his tax cuts. McLaughlin de-
fended Clinton's decision, saying the
first two years were about "heavy
emphasis on deficit reduction first."
Aides to the President told The New
York Times the tax cuts would cost
about $60 billion over the next five
years. It would be paid by cost-cutting
measures in five federal departments,
and by continuing the cap of discretion-
ary programs through 2000.

NATIONAL REPORT
Govs. compromise on welfare plan
WASHINGTON - Wrapping up a four-day meeting,
the National Governors' Association adopted a policy
statement demanding wide latitude over welfare pro-
grams.
But governors could not agree on whether welfare
should remain an individual entitlement or be converted
into a giant block grant program under which the states
would decide who gets benefits.
Most Republicans favor block grants, but they could
not get the three-fourths support needed to put the associa-
tion on record as unequivocably in favor of block grants. Engler
In a bow to Democrats, the policy also included recommendations for
Congress if welfare remains an individual entitlement. In this scenario, the
federal government would set general standards and let states experiment.
Several Republicans said they agreed to that language only because they
considered it irrelevant.
"We're in a block grant world," said Michigan Gov. John Engler.

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Clinton withdraws
nomination for
Panama ambassador
WASHINGTON -- President
Clinton withdrew the nomination of
Robert Pastor to be U.S. ambassador
to Panama yesterday, bowing to the
determined opposition of Sen. Jesse
Helms (R-N.C.).
The White House released a letter
Clinton sent to Pastor in which the
president said he was "certain that
you would have served your country
with great distinction and honor in
that important post."
A White House aide during the
Carter administration, Pastor is direc-
tor of the Latin American Program at
the Carter center in Atlanta and ac-
companied the former President to
Haiti.
Helms blocked the nomination last
year when he was the ranking minor-
ity member of the Senate Foreign
Relations Committee.
This year, Helms became com-

mittee chairman, a shift that effec-
tively ended any hope the nomination
could be approved.
Helms criticized Pastor's role in
the Haiti negotiations andwhat he
called the Carter administration's
"giveaway" of the Panama Canal.
Suit claims Grisham 0
copied Bundy book
WASHINGTON-A lawyer who
represented executed serial killer Ted
Bundy and wrote a book about it is
suing best-selling novelist John
Grisham for copyright infringement,
claiming "The Chamber," -- his lat-
est work- "was copied largely" from
her book.
The lawyer representing both
Grisham and his publisher,
Doubleday, yesterday called the law-
suit by attorney-author Polly Nelson
"frivolous" and "a hustle."
Nelson, who wrote "Defending the
Devil: My Story as Ted Bundy's Last
Lawyer," presented a lengthy list of
"striking similarities" in the books.

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Russia criticizes
GOP-led Congress
MOSCOW - Russia warned
America's new Republican-led Con-
gress yesterday to refrain from "con-
frontational outbursts" and appeals to
"punish Russia" by restricting U.S.
assistance.
The unusually strong warning by
Russian Foreign Ministry spokesman
Grigory Karasin was a response to a
bill introduced last month in the House
of Representatives by Rep. Gerald
Solomon (R-N.Y.), one of a growing
number of GOP lawmakers who want
to make American assistance depen-
dent upon Russia's arms control poli-
cies, on its behavior toward its neigh-
bors and on progress toward a free-
market economy.
"It's not that we are afraid of the
prospect of scaled-down American
assistance," Karasin said at a news
briefing. "The issue is different. The
confrontational outbursts in Congress
are fraught with serious complica-
tions in our relations and do not meet
the national interests of the United
States itself."
He added: "Our partnership, initi-
ated by the Republican administra-
tion and successfully continued by

the Democratic administration, is too
important to the fate of international
peace for anyone to try to make it
hostage to opportunistic interests and
partisan squabbles."
France proposes "'
Balkans conference
PARIS - France yesterday pro-
posed an international conference to
resolve territorial claims by rebel
Serbs in Croatia and Bosnia before a
multi-front war dashes all hopes of
peace in the Balkans.
"I have reached the conviction that
this is the last-chance scenario for i
everyone," Foreign Minister Alain
Juppe said in a statement published
by the newspaper Le Monde.
Juppe called for "a summit meet-
ing of the main protagonists in the
tragedy," followed by a broader con-
clave -involving the United States,
Russia and the European Union.
The United States has been appre-
hensive about holding another large
peace parley, but diplomats said
Washington is revising its strategy
following an effort to apply direct
pressure on Bosnian Serb leader
Radovan Karadjic that proved fruit-
less.
- From Daily wire services

'he M'cnigan Daly (iS: SN 0459r) is puoisnea Monday tnrougn r-nay aunring e rali an winter terms oy
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EDITORIAL STAFF

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NEWS Nate Hurley, Managing Editor
EDITORS: Jonathan Berndt, Lisa Dines. Andrew Taylor, Scot Woods.
STAFF: Danielle Belkin, Cathy Boguslaski, Jodi Cohen. Spencer Dickinson, Kelly Feeney. Christy Glass, Ronnie Glassberg. Jennifer
Harvey. Katie Hutchins, Daniel Johnson. Amy Klein, Stephanie Jo Klein, Maria Kovac. Tall Kravitz, Frank C. Lee, Gail
Mongkolpradit, Zachary M. Raimi, Maureen Sirhal, Matthew Smart, Vahe Tazian, Michelle Lee Thompson. Josh White.
GRAPHICS: Laura Nemiroff, Julie Tsai, Kevin Winer.
CALENDAR EDITOR: Josh White.
EDITORIAL Julie Becker, Janes Nash, Editors
STAFF: James Cho, Allison Dimond. Jed Friedman. Ephraim R. Gerstein, Lauren Goldfarb, Craig Greenberg, Adrienne Janney,
Patrick Javid, Jeff Keating, Joel F. Knutson, Jim Lasser. Jason Litstein, Partha Mukhopadhyay. Scott PencI. Jean Twenge, David
Wartowsk=.
SPORTS Paul Barger, Managing Editor
EDITORS: Darren Everson, Antoine Pitts, Tom Seeley, Ryan White.
STAFF: Rachel Bachman, Roderick Beard, Eugene Bowen, Scott Burton, Nicholas J. Cotsonika, Sarah DeMar, Marc Diller, Brett
Forrest, Alan Goldenbach, James Goldstein. Ravi Gopal, Chaim Hyran, Michael Joshua. Julie Keating, Brett Krasnove, John Leroi,
Marc Lightdale, Dan McKenzie. Rebecca Moatz. Jed Rosenthal. Davy Rothbart. Danielle Rumore, Melanie Schuman, Tim Smith,
Barry Sollenberger. Doug Stevens. Michelle Lee Thompson.
ARTS Tom ErIewine, Heather Phares, Editors
EDITORS: Melissa Rose Bemrardo (Theater, MantCarlson (Fine Arts), Kirk Miller (Books), Heather Phares (Music), Liz Shaw
(Weekend etc.), Alexandra Twin (Filmi), Ted Watts (Weekend, etc.).
STAFF: Mat Benz, Jennifer Buckley Mark Carlson, Thomas Crowley Ella de Leon. Ben Ewy, Aride Gandsman. Brian Gnatt Josh
Herrngton, Karl Jones, Shirley Lee, Scott Plagenhoef, Fred Rice, Joshua Rich. Dirk Schulze, Sarah Stewart, Prashent Tamiaskar,
Bian Wise, Robert Yoon.
PHOTO Jonathanturle, Evan Petrie, Editors

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STAFF: Tonya Broad, Mike Fitzhugh. Mark Friedman, Douglas Kanter, Stephanie Lim, Judith Perkins, Kristen Schaefer, Molly
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