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October 24, 1994 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1994-10-24

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2 - The Michigan Daily - Monday, October 24, 1994
- - - lII

ATTENTION
INTERNATIONAL GRADUATE STUDENTS
If you would like to live in the U.S.A. after graduation but cannot,
perhaps your future lies in Canada.
CANADIAN IMMIGRATION OPPORTUNITIES for graduates with
advanced degrees and work experience in Engineering, Computers,
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Find out if you qualify. For free assessment, fax or send your resume
or call Paul Scott at:
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BARRISTERS & SOULCITORS
CANADIAN IMMIGRATION LAWYERS
130 Bloor Street West, Suite 604
Toronto, Ontario, Canada, M5S 1N5
Phone: (416) 960-8876 Fax: (416) 924-2371
or contact us e-mail rekjohn@inforamp.net
Rekai & Johnson will be at the University during the week of
November 7 to 11, 1994. Check this newspaper for further details.

DEBATE
Continued from page 1
liam Roundtree - both on the No-
vember ballot - must also be al-
lowed to participate.
After hearing of Giddings' deci-
sion, Wege said his campaign called
the station and asked for a spot at the
,table. The station agreed.
"I'm looking forward to the possi-
bility of amuch bigger audience to give
our message to," Wege said. "Judge
Giddings' decision is a great and long-
overdue victory for democracy in
America."
Coon said seeing all of the candi-
dates was in the public's best interest.
"I'm proud to have been the one
that took the action that was respon-
sible for getting the other two candi-

dates in," he said.
Coon added that while Roundtree
and Wege may be "way out there in
left field," their viewpoints should
still be heard.
Roundtree's campaign did not re-
turn calls yesterday.
WKAR's original format was a one-
hour debate between Carr and
Abraham, but they invited Coon after a
poll earlier this month showed he had
5-percent support fromMichigan vot-
ers, qualifying him as a major-party
candidate under Michigan law.
Carragreed to the addition of Coon,
but Abraham objected, saying if one
third-party candidate were to be in-
vited, all should be invited.
So WKAR modified its schedule,
planning for a 40-minute Carr-
Abraham debate, to be followed by a

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Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-1349
PRESENTS:
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THIS WEEK:
Monday, October 24, 1994
Summer Program in
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Tuesday, October 25, 1994
Academic Year Exchange Programs in
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Thursday, October 27, 1994
Summer Program in
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All meetings will be held from 5:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m.
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AN ENTHUSIASTIC MAYOR WHO
REPRESENTS ALL OF ANN ARBOR

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20-minute interview of Coon by the
moderator. Coon then sued the sta-
tion, claiming there was no way
WKAR could guarantee him an audi-
ence equal to that of the debate.
Giddings' ruling is something of a
precedent in Michigan, where Senate
debates traditionally involve only ma-
jor-party candidates. Coon has fought
repeatedly for a spot on their stage.
On Oct. 8, Coon supporters dressed
as chickens and greeted the crowd at
the Michigan-Michigan State football
game to criticize Carrand Abraham for
declining an invitation to attend a
League of Women Voters debate. The
debate fell through because only Coon
agreed to attend.
As for this week's debate,
Abraham's assistant campaign man-
ager Steve Hessler said they would
accept the new format. "It has been
Spence's position from the very be-
ginning that if you're going to include
one third-party candidate, you have
to include all of them," Hessler said.
Carr campaign spokesman Craig
Sutherland said, "We think it's a win-
ning situation for the voters."
The presence of the three new can-
N ELMS
Continued from page 1
centered." He said the Flint campus
must offercourses that meet the needs
of part-time students in a manufactur-
ing-intensive area.
Nelms said the campus must make
a firm commitment to helping its stu-
dents succeed. "Campuses like the
University of Michigan-Flint can and
must help to reduce the gap between
the haves and the have-nots."
Members of the Flint community,
students and faculty filled Whiting
Auditorium to pledge their support for
Nelms. Many members of his family
and colleagues from IU-East alsojoined
in the celebration for Nelms. "I offer
you our congratulations and welcome
CHANCELLOR
Continued from page 1
highereducation, we must help them to
succeed academically," Nelms said.
During the summerof 1964, Nelms
picked 465 pounds of cotton. The fol-
lowing fall, he was the only one of his
friends to enter college. He went on to
receive a bachelor's degree from the
University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff
and his master's degree and his doctor-
ate from Indiana University.
Today, Nelms keeps asinglecotton
boll on his desk, a reminder of how far
one can go with an education.
With its more modern buildings,
the Flint campus rests in starkcontrast
to the University's Ann Arbor loca-
tion.
But the exterior is just where the
differences between the two campuses
begin.
As a commuter campus, the aver-
age student is 27 or 28 years old. "The
people bring an enormous amount of
experience and we need to buildon that
experience," Nelms said.
The school sits in an urban environ-
ment - with the city lurking around
the fortress-like campus.
This fortress environment, however,
has been altered by the purchase of a
defunct shopping center. The building
now holds the administrative offices
- and a food court on its first floor.

Nelms is also creating a different
mood on campus, one that stands in
contrast to Ann Arbor.
"Ido alot of walking around.I stop,
I talk with students. I go to student

didates will undoubtedly add more
friction to the debate.
For example, the conservative
Abraham advocates a strong military,
but Roundtree would eliminate the
Department of Defense altogether.
Roundtree would also set the mini-
mum wage at $10 an hour and mandate
a maximum 30-hour work week.
Wege said his party centers around
the idea of conflict-free politics, but
Abraham and Carr have spent much
energy trying to draw a stark contras
between themselves. Wege said his
party advocates the use of transcen-
dental meditation to reduce stress in
society, which Wege said has been
shown to improve health, and reduce
crime and drug use.
Coon advocates reducing federal
control of government where pos-
sible, pointing to education as an is-
sue where state and local government
should have more authority.
"In spite of everything we do,
we're getting an unresponsive fedeal
government," Coon said, adding that
both parties were equally at fault.
- The Associated Press contributed
to this report.
you to our community," said RobertV.
Jewell, president of the Flint alumni*
association.
Jewell told Nelms: "In the past
months you have spoken of avision of
the future. We will be the promoters,
the messengers and the supporters."
Representing the students of the
Flint campus, VictoriaMcKenze wel-
comed the chancellor. "With Charlie
Nelms as our fourth chancellor, we the
students ... as an unified force (will)
achieve our dreams and aspirations."@
Sandy Lingley, vice chancellor of
external relations atIU-East traveled to
Flint to see Nelm's inauguration.
"We loved Charlie, and we loved
the inauguration," she said. "We're
very happy for him, but we're sad to
lose him."
government meetings, I go to student
functions," Nelms said.
Healso holds his executive officers
to the same standards. Nelms said he
told them: "I expect you to get out of
your office and out of your building."
And this mood on campus seems to
be impressing the students.
"Chancellor Nelms has an open-
door policy to his office. Whether he's
at lunch, or when he is walking in the
corridors of this institution, he will stop
to not only say, 'Hello,' with a bright*
smile, but he will also ask, 'How's it
going?' 'Is there anything that Ican do
to help you?"'"said Victoria McKenze,
president of the Flint Student Govern-
mentCouncil.
Regent James Waters (D-
Muskegon) also noticed theatmosphere
on campus.
"He's going to be the greatestchan-
cellor we've ever had here at Flint. H
has so much energy and he's been out
in the community. I'm amazed how
many people already know him," Wa-
ters said.
University President James J
Duderstadt, who is Nems' boss, praised
the new chancellor. "He really has a
super reputation of bringing together
various communities and providing
leadership to move them ahead."
The Flint campus was organized*
in 1956 and is one of the University's
threeregional campuses.
Before coming to Flint, Nelms

served as chancellor and professor of
education at Indiana University Eastin
Richmond. With about 2,600 students;
IU-East is one of eight campuses in the
Indiana University system.

Mayor Ingrid Sheldon serving as Grand Marshall of
Ann Arbor Jaycees 4th of July Parade

"The mayor shall be the ceremonial head of the city"
-Ann Arbor City Charter
Paid for by the Ingrid Sheldon for Mayor Committee.
Doug F. Ziesemer, Treasurer , 122 S. Main, Ann Arbor 48104

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