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September 08, 1994 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1994-09-08

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Page2

THE MICHIGAN DAILY, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 1994

Paae 2 THE MICHIGAN DAILY. THURSDAY. SEPTEMBER 8. 1994

'1We did it!

SE

999

Geea iigacail New Student E dition 1 994
General News, Perspectives,UnvrtyArsAn Arbor& Sports

ELECTIONS
Continued from page 1
In other primary results, state Sen.
Lana Pollack (D-Ann Arbor) lost to
U.S. Rep. Bob Carr (D-Lansing) by
less than 1 percent of the vote to decide
who will vie to replace outgoing U.S.
Sen. Donald Riegle.
"It was a nip and tuckrace," Pollack
said.
Carr will face former GOP state
chair Spencer Abraham, who defeated
radio talk-show hostRonnaRomney in
a close race.
In the race to replace retiring U.S.
Rep. WilliamFord (D-Ypsilanti Town-
ship), who represents the University in
Congress, first-term state Rep. Lynn
Rivers (D-Ann Arbor), will face former
Bush Administration assistant Labor
Secretary John Schall.
And former Ann Arbor Mayor Liz
Brater is vying to replace Rivers in the
state Legislature. Braterdefeated Peter
Nicolas, a fourth-ward maverick coun-
cil member.
You'Ve read The
Michigan Daily, now
write for it. Come to our
Mass meeting on
Thursday, Sept. 21., at5
7:30 p.m., in the Student
Publications Building,v
located next to the SAB.
Or call us at 76-DAILY.
I',
Cal Kate t7615546
Term papers Resumes
A lications Letters Etc.
PROSPECT
PLACE
MAKE A DIFFERENCE!
Help with homelessness,
hunger and personal and
family problems. The SOS
Community Crisis Center
and the Prospect Place
Family Shelter in Ypsilanti
have Volunteer and Work
Study Positions available
for the fall. Call for more
information at 485-8730.
WONDERING
WHERE YOU'RE
GOING TO WORK
THIS FALL?
Eliminate one of your
headaches and
secure a position today.
A is
ER now
hiring
We offer:
" extremely flexible
scheduling

* free meals and
uniforms
" competitive wages
,And More!!!
Apply today at Wendy's
Michigan Union e 530 S. State
Ann Arbor, M1 48109
EOE

SMOKING
Continued from page 1
Under the new policy, smoking
continues to be prohibited in all Uni-
versity vehicles. Additionally, the sale
of tobacco products has been banned
on campus.
With the exception of specially
designated rooms and apartments,
smoking has been banned in all Uni-
verssity housing facilities. Residents
and applicants can request smoking
rooms.
First-year student and occasional
smoker John Arnold said people who
want to smoke will continue smok-
ing, regardless of the inconvenience.

"The new policy probably won'tmake
much difference," he said.
Associate Dean of Student
Delories Sloan said it is still too early
to determine the effectiveness of the
new policy, or what the University
community's reaction will be.
"For some people it probably
won't make a difference. The people
who need to smoke will go outside,"
Sloan said.
Sloan said she has noticed a sig-
nificant difference since the Unic"
became a non-smoking building lap"
year.
She said that a large group ofsmok-
ers who used to gather on the ground
floor no longer assemble there.

RAPIST
Continued from page 1
police profile. "Get this straight, I'
not Black.Ihate that.... I'm very dark
complected. I might appear Black, but
I'm not," the caller said. He goes on to
say that he is of Puerto Rican and
Mexican descent but could be mis-
taken for Black because of his dark
complexion.
A profile of the rapist was distrib-
uted to residents on Ann Arbor's north-
west side Aug. 22 where most of tl
attacks occurred. The profile descibes
the rapist as a 25- to 35-year-old Afri-
can American man who dominates his
partner and is likely to be unemployed.
Thus far, investigators have re-
ceived more than 300named suspects.
Fifty of the suspects have given DNA
tests and all have been cleared.
Because of the broad description
and little evidence available, the loc 4
NAACP chapter has been distributin
cards to African American men out-
lining their rights to ensure that their
"civil rights are not being eroded,"
said Raymond Mullins, local NAACP
president.

JONATHAN LUHIE:/Daily
Acting Ann Arbor Police Chief
Walter Lunsford announces a
telephone call from a man claiming
to be a serial rapist.

Borders
Michigan Book & Supply
Michigan Union Bookstore
Shaman Drum
Student Book Exchange
Ulrich's
West Side Books
Ia'HiN A R ERL.
Adrian's T Shirts
Bam Tee's Design
Bivouac
Footprints
Fourth Ave. Birkenstock
Hary's Army Surplus
Ink, Ink
Marty's Menswear
Schlanderer's Jewelers
University Spirit
Urban Outfitters
Van Boven
Sind Pg
Columbia Cable
Liberty St. Video
State Theatre
The Ark
Bio Energy M ica Center
David Rosenberg, Therapist
Jeffrey Michael Powers
Michigan Head Pain Institute
One on One Athletic Club
Powerhouse Gym
Shotokan Karate
UM Adult lifestyles
UM Health Services
YMCA
Acree's Furniture Resale
Ann Arbor Carpet
Big George Appliance
Carpet Sarn
Dragon's Lair Futon
Grace's Select Secondhand
Kiwanis' Rummage Sale
Mattress & Furniture Brok.
Mattress Plus
Montgomery Ward
SCP Enterprises
Stairway to Heaven
UM Carpet Suppliers
UiM Surplus
Waterbed Gallery
Ann Ar tamp & Coin
Arthur Anderson
Computer Renaissance
Fantasy Attic Costumes
Kenytown Shops
Schlenker Hardware
Varsity Ford
Village Apothecary
Washtenaw News
Arbor Farms
Great Harvest Bread
Kroger
Village Comer
Arcade B~arbrs
Campus Barber
Dascola
Hair Express
Miro
Trade Secret

Gen News p.3
Sports p.2, Arts p.2,
Persp p.2, 4, 10
Sports p.9, Ann A p.10,
Univ p.6,10, Pers p.8,
Gen News p.20
Persp p.5
Sports p.4
Sports p.10, Ann A p.5,
Univ p.2,
Gen News p.17,19
Arts p.6
Persp p.2
Gen News p.6
Ann A p.10
Gen News p.8
Persp p.9
Gen News p.8
Sports p.5
Persp p.5
Gen News p.16
Gen News p.16
Arts p.6
Univ p.9, Persp p.5
Arts p.4
Sports p.5
Arts p. 4
Persp p.5
Arts p.6
Gen News p.13
Gen News. p.9
Gen News p.13
Gen News p.5
Gen News p.12
Sports p.4
Sports p.3
Gen News p.5
Gen News p.9
Gen News p.7
Univ p.7
Sports p.8
Gen News p.18
Univ p.7
Gen News p.3
Univ p.7
Persp p.2
Gen News p.5
Univ p.7
Gen News p.14
Gen News p.14
Persp p.4
Gen News p.10
Univ p.7
Gen News p.9
Gen News p.9
Gen News p.5
Gen News p.7
Univ p.12
Gen News p.3
Univ p.12
Gen News p.14
Gen News p.13
Gen News p.9
Gen News p.7
Sports p.5, Ann A p.2
Persp p.15
Sports p.
Gen News p.13
Gen News p.1 3
Gen News p.1 0
Gen News p.13
Gen News p.13
Ann A PA4
Gen News p.17
Univ p.7
Univ p.7
Univ p.7
Gen News p.9
Gen News p.6
Ann A p.9, 10
(C;Pn News .'An19

U-M Computing Services
U-M Counseling Services
U-M Library
U-M Medical Center
U-M Recycling
U-M School of Music
UAC
University Computing Ctr.
University Musical Society
Women's Issues Network
David Brownell Instruments
Herb David Guitar
PJ's Used Records
Schoolkid's Records
Wherehouse Records
R E L o
Ann Arbor Christian Ref.
Ann ArborhChurch of Christ
Campus Chapel
Canterbury House
Cornerstone Christian
Evangel. Temple Assembly
Eye of the Spiral
First Church, Scientist
First Congregational
First Presby. Ministry
Huron Hills Baptist
Lutheran Campus Ministry
Memorial Christian
New Beginnings Free Meth.
Newman Catholic Student
Northside Community
Seventh Day Adventist
St. Mar's
St. Pau'sLutheran
Trinity Evang. Lutheran
University Lutheran Chapel
Weis LutheranMinistry
Wesley Campus Ministry
Zen Buddhist Temple
Angelo's
Bandito's
Bell's Pizza
Big Boy Restaurant
Burger King
Cava Java Coffee
China Garden
China Gate
Cottage Inn
Dinersty
Domino's
Espresso Royale Coffee
Food By Phone
Gandy Dancer
Good Time Charley's
Jacque's
LittleCaesar's
Lovin' Spoonful
Mark's Midtown Coney
McDonald's
Mrs. Peabody
O'Sullivan's
Olga's
Parthenon
Pizza House
Pizza Uno
Raja Rani
San Fu
Steve's Lunch
Subway
The Burro
Wendy's
AATA
Cakemail Bakeries
Commuter Transportation
Conlin-Faber Travel
Council Travel
Decker Drugs
Dollar Bill Copying
First of America
First of America Bank
G-M Underwriters
Gold Bond Cleaners
Hi Fi Studio
Independent Postal Service
Kate's Resume
Mr. Stadium Laundry
National Bank of Detroit
Princeton Review Test Prep

Gen News p.5
Univ p.3
Persp p.5
Persp p.8
Univ p.11
Arts'p.6
Gen News p.6
Univ p.4
Arts p.4
Persp p.9
Gen News p.9
Gen News p.15
Arts p.5
Gen News p.15
Ann A p.5
Ann A p.9
Persp p.5
Ann A p.8
Ann A p.9
Ann A p.8
Ann A p.8
Ann A p.8
Ann A p.8
Ann A p.9
Ann A p.9
Ann A p.8
Ann A p.8
Ann A p.8
Ann A p.9
Persp p.6
Ann A p.9
Ann A p.8
Ann A p.8
Ann A p.9
Ann A p.9
Ann A p.8
Ann A p.9
Ann A p.8
Ann A p.9

VATICAN
Continued from page 1
international gathering, aimed at adopt-
ing a global population strategy for the
next 20 years that will hold the world's
population to 7.2 billion.
Despite confident assertions that
92 percent of the program's wide-
ranging and often ground-breaking
new policies had been agreed to in
advance, discussion of critical issues
such as expanded reproductive health
care, empowerment of women, refu-
gees and migration has been held up
for days as delegates have attempted
to resolve the abortion controversy.
In the conference hallways, a new
lapel button has appeared with in-
creasing frequency: "I Am Poped
Out."
Delegations from Scandinavia,
Europe and the United States - left
impatiently on the sidelines as the
optimism of Tuesday night disap-
peared - said there would be a final
attempt to try to win over the Vatican
and its allies and then the conference
document would be adopted with or
without them.
The University was represented
by Jason L. Finkle and C. Alison
McIntosh, two of the nation's leading
experts on population planning.
Before leaving, Finkle predicted
that the conference would turn out a
"watered-down document," but la-
beled the event a "veritable moving
feast of politics."
McIntosh, director of the
University's Population Fellows pro-
gram, has focused her interest on Af-
rica and Western Europe. She and
Finkle edited the 1994 book "The New
Politics of Population: Conflict and
Consensus in Family Planning."
By the end of the day, only five
nations - Honduras, El Salvador,
Guatemala, Ecuador and Malta -
looked to be firm holdouts on the

abortion issue.
"We will exercise a lot ofpatience
and try to bury our frustrations," sa
Timothy E. Wirth, U.S
undersecretary of state for global af-
fairs and head of the U.S. delegation.
In the end, he said, "there will be
dissenters from the document. There
is no other way, when some of the
delegations have such strong feel-
ings. ... The U.N. system works on
consensus. Consensus doesn't mean
unanimity. It means consensus."
An informal working group of 4
nations was given until Friday morn-
ing to try to work through the conflict.
Conference organizers also delayed
until Friday discussion of the contro-
versial issues of the right of access to
birth control services, sexual and re-
productive rights and reproductive
health.
A variety of delegations and orga-
nizations supporting more Iiberg
abortion policies angrily accused the
Vatican of holding the entire discus-
sion of global population policy hos-
tage to the abortion issue.
The National Audobon Society
asserted that the conference had been
"hijacked by ... the Vatican, which
seeks to impose its own view on
others."
Frances Kissling, president
Catholics for a Free Choice, was eve
more vehement. "How come a coun-
try (Vatican City), a so-called country,
that is in essence 800 square acres of
office space in the middle of Rome,
that has acitizenry that excludes women
and children, seems to attract the most
attention in talking about public policy
that deals with women and children?"
she demanded.
Several delegations allied with tl1
Vatican on the abortion issue predicted
that no global population strategy can
be strong and effective if it fails to take
into account the concerns of many of
the world's nations about abortion.

Arts p.8
Ann A p.7
Ann A p.4
Arts p.8
Gen News p.8
Persp p.4
Gen News p.16
Ann A p.4
Sports p.2
Gen News p.16
Ann A p.4
Ann A p.4
Arts p.8
Persp p.4
Gen News p.2
Arts p.8
Gen News p.16
Persp p.4
Gen News p.15
Univ p.12
Gen News p.20
Arts p.8
Persp p.4
Gen News p.16
Arts p.8
Arts p.8
Ann A p.5, Arts p.6
Gen News p.17
Arts p.8
Arts p.8
Gen News p.16
Ann A p.4, Arts p.8
Persp p.4
Gen News p.2, 20
Gen News p.10
Gen News p.12
Gen News p.19
Gen News p.19
Gen News p.16
Persp p.4
Sports p.8,
Gen News p.16
Sports p.8
Univ p.8
Gen News p.8
Arts p.7
Univ p.12
Gen News p.20
Gen News p.2
Univ p.7, 9
Persp p.3
Gen News p.16
Ppn n_5 r

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NEWS David Shepardson, Managing Editor
EDITORS: Nate H~urley, Mona Oureshi, Karen Talaski.
STAFF: Robin Barry, James R. Cho, Rebecca Detken, Lisa Dines, Sam T. Dudek, Ronnie Glassberg, Katie Hutchins, Michelle Joyce, Marls
Kovac, Andrea MacAdam, James M. Nash, Zachary M. Raimi, Rachel Scharfman, Megan Schimpf, Shari Sitron, Mpatanishi Tayari, Andrew
Taylor, Michelle Lee Thompson. Maggie Weyhing, April Woad, Scot Woods.
GRAPHICS: Jonathan Semdt (Editor), Andrew Taylor, Julie Tsai.
EDITORIAL Sam Goodstein, Flint Wainess, Editors
ASSOCIATE EDITORS: Julie Becker. Jason Lchtstein.
STAFF: Cathy Boguslaski, Eugene Bowen, Jed Friedman, Patrick Javid, Jeff Keating, Jim Lasser, Christopher Mordy, Elisa Smith, Allison
Sevens, Beth Wi,,,binski
LETTERS EDITOR:RAndy Hardin.
SPORTS Chad A. Safran, Managing Editor
EDITORS: Rachel Bachmn, Brett Forrest, Antoine Pitts, Michael Rosenberg
STAFF: Bob Abramson, Paul Barger, Scott Burton. Ryan Cuskaden, Marc Dller, Jennifer Otiberstein, Darren Everson, Ravi Gooat, Josh

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