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October 01, 1994 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1994-10-01

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The Michigan Daily -Monday, October 3, 1994 - 7

JAPAN
4ontnued from page 1
that span the globe, have agreed on a system
to measure the success of foreign firms in
gaining access to the Japanese market.
Japan has long been considered one of the
most difficult markets to enter. Despite its
government's assurances to the contrary, U.S.
trade officials say, the door is barricaded by a
combination of bureaucratic regulations, un-
fficial standards and other, often invisible,
arriers.
Despite what U.S. officials have charac-

terized as a history of backsliding by Japan on
previous trade agreements, a buoyant Kantor
said he is confident the new accords will stick.
"These agreements will not only work,
they're results-oriented, they're tangible,
they're concrete," said Kantor, who presided
over nonstop negotiations that began at 3 p.m.
EDT Friday and concluded at 11:05 a.m.
Saturday. "They'll be effective."
Clyde Prestowitz, a former trade official
and frequent critic of Japanese trade prac-
tices, said the agreements "put U.S.-Japanese
relations on a new plane. It's a win-win propo-
sition."
Prestowitz said the agreements should halt

the dramatic rise in the value of the yen
against the dollar, a phenomenon that has
made Japanese products increasingly expen-
sive in the United States.
The Japanese currency began climbing to
new highs against the dollar when a U.S.-
Japanese summit fell apart amid bitter re-
criminations last February.
In addition, he said, Japan "gets credit
internationally for being forward-looking and
flexible."
Another prominent critic of Japanese trade
practices, House Majority Leader Richard A.
Gephardt (D-Mo.) said "another wedge was
driven into the Japanese market" as a result of

the new accords.
"It's clear when the U.S. really stands up,
Japan opens up," Gephardt said. Even so, he
added, the agreements "still only address a
small percentage of our trade problems."
The senior members of the Japanese del-
egation, Trade Minister Ryutaro Hashimoto
and Foreign Minister Yohei Kono, headed
home immediately after the talks.
In a brief meeting with Japanese reporters,
Hashimoto said the agreements would help
smooth often-difficult U.S.-Japanese relations
across the board. The goodwill should spill
beyond trade to encompass political and dip-
lomatic issues, he said.

Japanese officials emphasized that the
agreements avoid setting specific "numerical
targets," an initial U.S. objective that Tokyo
had vowed for months to block.
But U.S. officials said the accords will
make it possible to gauge the openness of
Japanese markets. "The Japanese government
for the first time is committed to use objec-
tive, quantitative and qualitative criteria to
evaluate the progress made under these agree-
ments," Kantor said.
The impasse over measuring progress has
been the biggestfhurdle during the 15 months
since Clinton visited Tokyo in July 1993 and
launched the current round of negotiations.

HAITI,
Continued from page 1
country. In the U.S. military interven-
tion in Somalia, the lack of a success-
#1 disarmament effort played a key
role in the violence and chaos that
later enveloped the mission.
Dodd, interviewed on the CBS News
program "Face the Nation," said he be-
lieves U.S. soldiers will be killed or
woundedbeforethe mission, which began
two weeks ago and which the Senate team
said could lastatleast ayear, is completed.
Because the congressional delegation
thefirstofficial groupoutsidetheClinton
dministrationtovisitHaiti foranin-depth
assessment since the U.S. troops landed,
its findings are awaited with interest by
both critics and supporters of the military
operation. Congress is expected to vote
this week whether to give the administra-
tion a specific date for ending the U.S.
deployment.
Reflecting thedivided opinion in Con-
gress over the military action, House Mi-
erity Whip Newt Gingrich (R-Ga.)
warned that in venturing into disarming
the population, "the Clinton administra-
tion isnowon theedgeofadisaster.... We
are right now drifting steadily into a quick-
sand of misery."

I ?

RESEARCH
Continued from page 3
day at the Cobo Center in Detroit, is
an office technology and computer
expo that features more than 100 ex-
hibits with the latest technology in
home and office computer systems.
The conference also includes over
40 educational seminars for business
decision makers and consumers, such
as, "Are You Driven by. a Clock or a
Compass?", and a luncheon with rep-
resentatives from Microsoft.
Tickets are $15 at the door, and
the conference runs Oct. 6-8.
TechWalk is sponsored by AT&T,
Cellular One, WDIV-TV (Channel 4)

and Crain Communications, among
other Detroit-area companies.
Robotics Control System First to
Fly in Space
Electronic hardware and software
for the robot that flew into space on
last month's Discovery mission were
built at the Ann Arbor-based Envi-
ronmental Research Institute of
Michigan (ERIM).
The system, called Robot Oper-
ated Materials Processing System, was
designed to demonstrate commercial
ways to process semiconductor mate-
rials in the microgravity environment
of the spacecraft. On its maiden flight,
the system had 100-percent success
on its processing objectives.
- Daily staff reporter Michelle Lee
Thompson compiled this report.

D YL9 L Fo
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Intel Corporatioin Is
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* Open House
Tuesday, October 4th 5:00 P.M.
Michigan League
Kalamazoo Room
* Office Hours
Wednesday, October 5th

10:00 A.M.

- 1:00 P.M.

Michigan Business School
Paton Accounting Center
Room 2011
We look forward to
speaking with math,
economics and statistics

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