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September 16, 1994 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1994-09-16

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2 - The Michigan Daily - Friday, September 16, 1994

U.N. says civilian observers
will inspect Serbian border

MORE THAN JUST BOOKS

0

The Washington Post
BELGRADE - The head of in-
ternational observers dispatched to
verify the six-week-old Serbian block-
ade against fellow Serbs in neighbor-
ing Bosnia said yesterday the inspec-
tion of the 375-mile land and sea
border will be carried out by 135
civilians.
Nineteen Scandinavians are sched-
uled to begin work immediately as
the first of -the observers, said Bo
Pellnas, a retired Swedish general rep-
resenting Geneva-based peace nego-
tiators for Bosnia.
He told a news conference that the
observers will not be called monitors
and will not include military officers

as originally thought. Both conditions
were laid down by President Slobodan
Milosevic of Serbia, who argued that
otherwise his Serb nationalist opposi-
tion would veto the idea of observers
and perhaps demand the blockade be
rescinded.
A hard-line member of the
Bosnian Serb parliament, Momcilo
Krajisnik, said Wednesday that any
international presence on the border
was an "egregious mistake," damag-
ing Serb unity.
"Indeed, this is a shameful act by
the government of Serbia and
Montenegro," he said, "and their day
of reckoning will come."
European governments have de-

manded foreign observers along the
Serbia-Bosnia border to verify the
blockade as a condition for seeking to
lift the U.N. sanctions on Serbia and
Montenegro,
The sanctions were imposed two
years ago because of Serbia's support
of Bosnian Serb military forces fight-
ing the Muslim-run Bosnian govern-
ment in Sarajevo.
Hundreds of Serbian helicopter
flights have been heard over Bosnia
in the past 10 days flouting a no-fly
zone, U.N. and Western military of-
ficials told Reuter news agency. The
U.N. officials said they were con-
cerned that the flights over Bosnian
government-held land in the north-
east of the country may be a Yugoslav
army effort to resupply Bosnian Serb
forces.
Read theaily

JKNATHAN LUI/gdiy
Ken Mikolowski, Joe Cislo and Pat Staiger test the Electronic Media section at Shaman Drum. It opened yesterday

r '1.

Lookg For Fends?
Friends encourage us and support
us. Most people wish they had
more close friends. We would
like to help you build friendships.
Our student group is the largest
in town. Our students eat out
together, study the Bible together,
do fun things together, and more.
You can find a friend at Packard
Road Baptist Church.
Students-love our 11:00 a.m.
contemporary worship service
which is joyful, upbeat,
celebrative, and practical.
PACKARD ROAD BAPTIST CHURCH
Welcome Back Students Lunch at
12:15 this Sunday, September 18.

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Religious
Services
VAVAV AVA
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Christian Reformed campus ministry)
1236 Washtenaw Ct. 668-74211662-2402
(one block south of CCRB)
EXPLORE and ENJOY your FAITH
SUNDAY WORSHIP:
10 a.m.- "Befriending God
and Each Other"
6 p.m.- "Meditating Service of Prayer,
Silence Singing, and
Holy Communion"
WEDNEDAY
9-10 p.m. Meeting of
"The University Group"
Fun, food, provocative discussion
Rev. Don Postema, pastor
Ms. Lisa de Boer, ministry to students
Episcopal Church at U of M
CANTERBURY HOUSE
518 E. Washington St.
(behind Laura Ashley)
SUNDAY: 5 p.m.
Holy Eucharist
Followed by informal supper
All Welcome
665-0606
The Rev'd Virginia Peacock, Chaplain
CHRISTIAN LIFE CENTER CHURCH
Worship: 11 a.m. & 7 p.m.
2146 Moeller Ave. Ypsilanti
485-4670 Pastor Henry J. Healey
EYE OF THE SPIRAL
A student group for exploring Earth
based religions & Goddess spirituality
TH URSDAY: Informal meetings 9 p.m.
Guild House Ministry, 802 Monroe
Call 998-0725 or e-mail
ac583@leo.nmc.du
Fall Equinox Celebration
Friday, September 23, 1994
HURON VALLEY COMMUNITY CHURCH
Gay-Lesbian Ministry 741-1174
KOREAN CHURCH OF ANN ARBOR
3301 Creek Dr. 971-9777
SUNDAY:
9:30 a.m. English, 11 a.m. & 8 p.m. Korean
LUTHERAN CAMPUS MINISTRY
Lord of Light Lutheran Church, ELCA
801 S. Forest (at Hill St.), 668-7622
SUNDAY: Worship 10 a.m.
Welcome Picnic 5 p.m.
WEDNESDAY: Bible Study 6 p.m.
Evening Prayer 7 p.m.
NORTHSIDE COMMUNITY CHURCH
929 Barton Drive
Between Plymouth Rd. and Pontiac Trail
SUNDAYWorship -11 a.m.
Christian Education - 9:45 a.m.
A particular welcome to
North Campus students
PACKARD ROAD BAPTIST CHURCH
2580 Packard Road, Ann Arbor
Features the Largest Student Group in Town
SUNDAY: Bible Study 9:30 a.m.
Contemporary Worship Service at 11 a.m.
Sunday September 18:
"Welcome Back Students" free lunch
Kevin Richardson, Campus Minister
For Transportation Call 971-0773
ST. CLARE'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
2309 Packard Rd. 662-2449. Est. 1953.
Membership: 500. Ven. Douglas Evett &
Rev. Susan Bock. SUNDAY 8 a.m. and 10 a.m.
ST. MARY STUDENT PARISH
(A Roman Catholic Community at U-M)
331 Thompson * 663-0557
(Corner of William and Thompson)
Weekend Liturgies
SATURDAY 5 p.m.
SUNDAY: 8:30 p.m., 10 a.m., 12 noon,
5 p.m., and 7 p.m.
FlEIpAYi Confessions 4-5 p.m.
Curious about Neopagan Druidism?
Join us for workshops, rituals, etc.
Call SHINING LAKES GROVE,ADF
665-8428
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL, LCMS
1511 Washtenaw, near Hill
SATUR DAY: Worship 6:30 p.m.
SUNDAY: Worship 10:30 a.m.

PARKING
Continued from page 1
are duplex (two meters at each post).
Regarding the increase, he said, "We
have had a rash of people parking
with the meter post adjacent to their
vehicle doors, occupying two spaces."
Several University students who
received "post" tickets said only their
cars' fenders or bumpers were paral-
lel to the post when they were tick-
eted. They wished not to be named.
Many University students are dis-
satisfied with Ann Arbor parking. "I
think it's ridiculous for multiple agen-
cies to enforce the same area. There
should definitely be more parking on
central campus," said LSA junior
Chad Crawford.
There are alternatives to metered
parking for University students.
The advice of the Ann Arbor Park-
ing System is for students not to bring

MIWAMNINMNMWM

COM PUTERS
Continued from page 1
more. "No one checks to see if you
have bought your books, but you won't
do well if you don't have them."
Students who could not afford a
computer would be offered financial
aid to do so, often in the form of a loan
that would have to be repaid.
"The main drawback is the cost,"
MacCarthy said. "Essentially we are
doubling our tuition."
The proposal could outrage CSU
students who have seen their tuition
double over the past four years from
$780 per term in 1990 to $1,580 per
term now.
"Computers are expensive, but
when you think of per-term cost it
would be less than most people spend
on books," Rupert said.
The campuses involved are three
of the smallest in the CSU system.
Sonoma State enrolls 16,500;
Humboldt State, 7,100; and Cal Poly
San Luis Obispo, 15,500.
The University of Michigan has
never considered such a policy, said
Virgina Rezmierski, assistant to the
vice provost for Information Tech-
nology Division.
"Right from the beginning our
philosophy has been to provide large

public access sites," Rezmierski said.
San Diego State University is also
in the CSU system, but decided to
pass on the computer idea.
"We have some very good faci@
ties now," Lisa Dunn, spokeswoman
for the college's Office of Communi-
cation.
Dunn said, "We felt maintenance
would be a problem in terms of mak-
ing sure that all the students had the
right software programs,"
She added that training everyone
one to take care of their own comq-
puter and to fix problems that cor
up would be difficult to deal with.
MacCarthy agreed that the pro-
posal is in part a cost-cutting measure
by the schools.
"Two of the last three proposi-
tions (for more funding) have been
defeated," MacCarthy said. "But I
think it's more than that. Students
increasingly need a computer to not
be put at a disadvantage by those w'
have one."
If approved, the policy would be-
gin in 1995 for a three-year pilot pro-
gram to work out any problems.
"Whether it happens this year or
not, I'm not sure," MacCarthy sai;.
"But it's going to happen eventu-
ally."

their vehicles to campus. Scott said
that the local and University transit
systems should be sufficient for trav-
eling around town.
For those who still prefer to park
near campus, residential areas are
public streets and are not normally
restricted. Scott said, however, that
parkers should always be aware
restrictive signs or time limits thW
may be posted.
Monthly parking is available on'a
first-come, first-serve basis at six of
the city-owned structures. The cost of
a permit is $60 per month and may be
obtained by calling National Garages.
The University provides some al-
ternatives. Daytime parking for com-
muters is free in select commuter lots.
Students may purchase a yeas
pass from the University for $189.
The cost decreases each month. The
pass is refundable for spring and sum-
mer terms.

The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967) is published Monday through Friday during the fall and winter terms by
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NEWS David Shepardson, Managing Editor
EDITORS: James R. Cho, Nate Hurley, Mona Qureshi, Karen Talaski.
STAFF: Robin Barry, Rebecca Detken, Lisa Dines, Sam T. Dudek, Ronnie Glassberg, Katie Hutchins, Michelle Joyce, Maria
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