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April 15, 1994 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1994-04-15

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2- The Michigan Daily - Friday, April 15, 1994

Cigarette giants deny manipulating nicotine

OY, ME HARDIES!!!

WASHINGTON (AP) - Ciga-
rettes are not an addiction but merely a
pleasurable habit, much like a morning
cup of coffee or a dessert, the nation's
top tobacco executives told Congress
yesterday.
"You and Iboth know that Twinkies
don't kill a singleAmerican," said Rep.
Henry Waxman (D-Calif). "The dif-
ference between cigarettes and
Twinkies, and the other products you
mentioned is death."

The chiefs of the nation's 7 largest
tobacco companies spent more than
five hours yesterdaytestifying before
the House Energy and Commerce
health subcommittee, which Waxman
chairs, about what goes into cigarettes
and whether they're dangerous.
The hearing was sparked by the
Food andDrugAdministration's (FDA)
consideration of whether to regulate
cigarettes. If the FDA decides compa-
nies manipulate nicotine in cigarettes,

it could label the chemical a drug.
The government blames smoking
for some 400,000 deaths a year. Each
of the cigarette makers denied that there
is proof cigarettes cause lung cancer,
heart disease or many other ailments.
They denied ever manipulating the
amount of nicotine in cigarettes and
they denied that the chemical is addic-
tive. If it were, they said, 40 million
Americans couldn't have kicked the
habit since 1974.

"I have a common-sense definition
of addiction," said Philip Morris Presi-
dent William Campbell. "I'm a smoker
and I'm not a drug addict."
"We do not do anything to hook
smokers or keep them hooked," added
James Johnston, chair and chief execu-
tive of R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. "We
no more manipulate nicotine in ciga-
rettes than coffee makers manipulate
caffeine."
Rep. Mike Synar (D-Okla.) said a

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WASHINGTON (AP) - The
House responded to demands for tough
anti-crime legislation by authorizing
the death penalty yesterday for nearly
70 additional crimes.
Working on a$15 billion crime bill,
the House rejected by a 314-111 vote
an amendment that would have substi-
tuted life without parole for the death
penalty. Among new crimes that could
result in execution: drive-by shootings,
a killing committed while stealing a car
and activities of big-time drug dealers,
even if they don't result in death.
At the White House, President
Clinton focused on other parts of the
bill as he addressed a ceremony honor-
ing police officers.
The bill, he told the officers, would
give them "the tools you need to do
your jobs."
"This is not a partisan issue or a

sectional issue or a racial issue or an
income issue," Clinton said. "If any-
thing should truly make us a United
States of America, it should be the
passionate desire to restore real free-
dom to our streets."
Judiciary Committee Chair Jack
Brooks, (D-Texas), led the battle against
the amendment to replace the bill's
death penalty provisions with life in
prison without parole.
"Plain common sense tells us that
the death penalty is the only way to
send an unequivocal message that some
conduct simply will not be borne solely
by innocent victims..." Brooks said.
Rep. Michael Kopetski, (D-Ore),
who proposed the amendment with the
support of the congressional Black and
Hispanic caucuses, said, "In my view,
life without any hope of release consti-
tutes death by incarceration, a stiff pen-
alty by any standard."

A University bus driver displays a skull and crossbones in his windshield t'
poke fun at a colleague who shows a smiley face on his bus.

Guest Speaker at
CAMPUS CHAPEL
Sunday, 10:00 a.m
State Representative
Lynn Jon dahl
candidate for governor
Uniied Christia anst Member "
Sermon: "The Christian and Politics"

CODE
Continued from page 1
ments to give their views on what should
we look for."
Despite recent advertisements and
electronic mail postings, Wolf said he
feels disappointed by the lack of re-
sponse.
"Students as well as other groups
should be concerned with the search
for a new housing director. We are
trying to solicit input from everyone,
but thus far no one has responded."
Wolf added that this will not be a
forum to discuss the former director
who was reassigned to a new position
after 16 years in the Housing division.
"We want to know what people
think to help us in our selection pro-
cess," he said.
Hartford formed the advisory com-
mittee in late March to conduct a na-
tionwide search to fill the spot before
classes resume in September.
"She wants us to submit a list of
three to five unranked names along
with a list of strengths and weaknesses
of the candidates. The goal is to have
the names in sufficient time to appoint
someone to take over by Sept. 1," Wolf
said.
The Housing director will oversee a

$60 million budget with a permanent
staff of 800 full-time employees and
more than 2,000 student staff mem-
bers.
"The director should be able to
manage a healthy size budget, good
academic credentials and a vision of
how we implement programs to im-
prove conditions where students live
and spend their time at the University.
There is a need for developmental ac-
tivity for current students," Hartford
said.
"We want someone who can build
bridges and connect with academic and
other parts of the University," Hartford
said.
The committee includes Associate
Engineering Dean Michael Parson,
Associate LSA Dean Michael Martin
and three students: MSA President Julie
Neenan, Residence Hall Association
President Richard Pitts, and Dental
School student Walter Kozin. Gary
Brewer, dean of School of Natural
Resources, is chair of the committee.
Hughes is currently executive di-
rector of development and external re-
lations for student affairs.
_ The Public Comments is sched-
uled for Monday from4 to6 p.m. at the
Union in the Wolverine Room. Stu-
dents who call the Dean of Students
Office will be given priority.

E-MAIL
Continued from page 1
The drive for the conferences was
kicked off in August by Zarko when he
filed a Freedom of Information Act
(FOIA) request for access to
REGCOMP. The University denied
him access to the conference on the
grounds that all electronic communi-
cation is private.
Zarko sued the University in
Washtenaw Circuit Court in Decem-
ber for access to the conference.
Lawyers for both papers threatened
to join Zarko's suit, but agreed not to
after the conferences were released.
Zarko is continuing his suit against
the University for $3,500 in punitive
damages-$500 for each regent on the
conference and $500 for violating the
FOIA.
He accused the University of being
"arbitrary and capricious" by backing
down on its stance that the conference
RECORDS
Continued from page 1
students, such as the members of the
MSAStudentRightsCommission, who
are interested in determining whether
or not the statement is being imple-
mented in a manner which does not
violate student rights," Kight said.
The change stemmed from a series
of articles in the Daily which identified
students sanctioned under the code
through connecting incidents with re-
ports of criminal charges.
"No information is listed other than
the general type of alleged action, the
outcome of the case, and the sanction
imposed. The so-called records are no

is private because newspapers and their
attorneys jumped into the fray.
"Either the issue is worth fighting
with the Ann Arbor News and The
Detroit Free Press or it wasn't worth
fighting," Zarko said.
Harrison said there will never be*
another computer conference for the
regents.
"I can't ever imagine us doing it
because the regents don't want any-
thing that would appear to be a viola-
tion of the Open Meetings Act,"
Harrison said.
The FOIA does not include specific
mention of any computer communica-
tions including conferences or elec-
tronic mail.
A federal proposal regarding e-mail
would require government agencies to
preserve all computer correspondence
in the same way paper records are
recorded. Then e-mail would be sub-
ject through the federal FOIA, like
other records.
more informative than the statistics
that are periodically released by Stu-
dent Affairs," Kight said.
The ultimate arbiter of this issue and
of decisions on all University policies is
the University Board of Regents.
Regent Deane Baker (R-Ann Ar-
bor) shared the views of many on the
board as far as the release of records. "I
have not looked into the issue, so I'm
not really ready to address the issue but
I will in due course," Baker said.
"I have never supported the code
and I believe it is not viable in aUniver-
sity setting," he said. "The fewer rule
we codify on rules of conduct, the
better off we are."
- Daily Staff Reporter Hope Calati
contributed to this report.

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Religious
Services
AVAVAVAVA
ANN ARBOR CHRISTIAN REFORMED CHURCH
1717 Broadway (near N. Campus)
665-0105
Traditional Service-9 a.m.
Contemporary Service-11:15 a.m.
Evening Service-6 p.m.
Complete Education Program
Nursery care available at all services
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Christian Reformed campus ministry)
1236 Washtenaw Ct. 668-7421/662-2402
lone block south of CCRB]
EXPLORE and ENJOY your FAITH
SUNDAY: 10 a.m. - Guest Speaker
State Rep. Lynn Jondahl
Candidate for Governor
6 p.m. - Meditative Worship
Rev. Don Postema, pastor
Ms. Barb O'Day, ministry to students
CHRISTIAN LIFE CHURCH
Schorling Auditorium
School of Education
SUNDAY: Service 11 a.m.
HURON VALLEY COMMUNITY CHURCH
Gay-Lesbian Ministry 741-1174
LUTHERAN CAMPUS MINISTRY
Lord of Light Lutheran Church, ELCA
801 S. Forest (at Hill St.), 668-7622
SUNDAY: 10 a.m.- Contemporary Liturgy
for the Easter Season
WEDNESDAY: 6 p.m. -
"Message of Mark" Study
7 p.m. - Holden Vespers
ST. MARY'S STUDENT PARISH

Kathryn P. O'Brien1

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63-2973
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Presented by the New American Wing
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ne Micnigan Daily(ISS U45967) is publisnea Monday tnrougn rioay during tne rail ano winter terms by
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EDITORIAL STS

Hall;

14

NEWS David Shepardson, Managing Editor
EDITORS: Nate Hurley, Mona Qureshi, Karen Sabgir, Karen Talaski.
STAFF: Robin Barry, Hope Calati, James R. Cho, Rebecca Detken, Lisa Dines, Sam T. Dudek, Ronnie Glassberg. Michele Hatty, Katie
Hutchins, Michelle Joyce. Judith Kae.,Maria Kovac, Andrea MacAdam, Patricia Montgomery, James M. Nash, Zachary M. Raimi,
Rachel Scharfman. Megan Scimpf, Shari Sitron, Mpatanishi Tayari, Michelle Lee Thompson, Maggie Weyhing. April Wood, Scot Woods.
CALENDAR EDITOR: Andrew Taylor.
GRAPHICS: Jonathan Bemdt (Editor). Jennifer Angeles. Andrew Taylor.

EDITORIAL Sam Goodstein, Flint Wainess, Editors
ASSOCIATE EDITORS: Julie Becker. Jason Lichtstein.
STAFF- Cathy Boguslaski, Eugene Bowen, Jed Friedman, Patrick Javid, Jeff Keating, Jim Lasser, Christopher Mordy. Elisa Smith, Allison
Stevens. Beth Wierzbinski.
LETTERS EDITOR: Randy Hardin.
SPORTS Chad A. Safran, Managing Editor
EDITORS: Rachel Bachman, Brett Forrest, Tim Rardin, Michael Rosenberg. Jaeson Rosenfeld.
STAFF: Bob Abramson, Paul Barger, Tom Bausano. Charlie Breitrose, Scott Burton, Ryan Cuskaden, Marc Diller. Jennifer Duberstein,
Darren Everson, Ravi Gopal, Ryan Herrington, Brett Johnson. Josh Kaplan, Josh Karp, Will McCahill, Brent McIntosh. Dan McKenzie.
Rebecca Moatz, Antoine Pitts, J.L. RostamAbadi, Melanie Schuman, Dave Schwartz, Tom Seeley, Brian Sklar, Tim Smith, Elisa Sneed,
Barry Sollenberger, Doug Stevens, Ken Sugiura, Ryan White, Heather Windt.
ARTS Melissa Rose Bernwrdo, Nna Hodael, Editors
EDITORS: Jason Carroll (Theater), Tom Erlewine (Music), Rona Kobell (Books). Darcy Lockman (Weekend etc.), John R. Rybock
(Weekend etc. Michael Thompson (Film).
STAFF: Jordan Atlas. Nicole Baker. Matt Carlson, Jin Ho Chung. Thomas Crowley, Andy Dolan, Ben Ewy, Johanna Flies, Josh Herrington,
Kristen Knudsen, Karen Lee, Gianluca Montatti, Heather Phares, Scott Plagenhoef, Marni Raitt, Austin Ratner, Dirk Schulze, Liz Shaw,
Sarah Stewart. Alexandra Twin, Ted Watts.
PHOTO Michelle Guy, Evan Petis, Editors
STAFF. Anastasia Banicki, Mark Friedman, Mary Koukhab. Elizabeth Lippman, Jonathan Lurie. Rebecca Margolis, Judith Perkins. Joe
Westrate, Sarah Whiting. Chris Wolf.

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