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February 18, 1994 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1994-02-18

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2 - The Michigan Daily - Friday, February 18, 1994

REGENTS
Continued from page I.
tially more controversial speech are
going to be effectively subject to bur-
den. It is not content neutral."
"Personally, I'm not thrilled by
Hash Bash, but I support free speech
on the Diag," Kight added.
"This is a groundless attempt to
suppress free speech," Hill said.
E ,,
At the public comments session of
the regent's meeting yesterday, mem-
bers of the men's gymnastics team
again urged the regents to reconsider
the decision by the Athletic Depart-
ment to drop the team's varsity status.
The move was made as a result of the
University's attempt to comply with

the 60-40 percent gender equity rule
mandated by the Big Ten last year.
Incoming Athletic Director Joe
Roberson has said that no reexamina-
tion of the decision will take place
unless the regents request it.
Following several emotional pleas
by parents and student members of
the team, Bob Darden, coach of the
gymnastics team, asked the regents to
reconsider the decision.
"This is notgenderequity," Darden
said. "The ball is in your court. You
have to act."
Regent Philip Power (D-Ann Ar-
bor) said, "I'm sure this subject will
come up again."
-- Daily News Editor David
Shepardson contributed to this
report.

Two parties to boycott S. African elections .

THE WASHINGTON POST
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa
- Inkatha Freedom Party Leader
Mangosuthu Buthelezi said yester-
day that his party will stick to its
boycott of South Africa's April elec-
tion despite a package of constitu-
tional concessions offered Wednes-
day to induce his participation.
The rejections of the concessions
mean that South Africa's first all-
races election set for April 26-28 will
be waged without the participation of
the two parties that most militantly
oppose an African National Congress
government - the likely result of the
vote.
More importantly, it raises the risk
of a strife-filled campaign, challenges

to the legitimacy of the ballot and
secessionist agitation.
Buthelezi, in a harshly worded
statement, derided the constitutional
compromise put forth by the ANC
and the white-minority government
as a public-relations gimmick.
"What utter hypocrisy," declared
Buthelezi, who is also chief minister
of the Zulu tribal homeland.
"Mr. Mandela's statement
amounts to no more than cheap poli-
ticking on life and death issues."
The package unveiled by ANC
President Nelson Mandela includes
amendments to a new interim consti-
tution that would strengthen regional
powers, provide for a separate ballot
for national and regional parliaments,
ensure symbolic status fbr the Zulu

monarchy, change the name of the
province of Natal to KwaZulu-Natal
and adopt a constitutional principle
that would force the next government
to explore ways to accommodate the
desire for self-determination of any
ethnic group in the country.
The ANC and the governmenthave
said that all these proposals would be
adopted by a special Parliament ses-
sion to be convened early next month,
even if the recalcitrant parties do not
chose to take part in the election.
A third boycotting group, the
homeland government of
Bophuthatswana, made no official
response to the compromise package
but offered some encouraging sig-
nals. It is scheduled to meet with the
ANC later in the week to discuss

possible participation in the election.
Afrikaner Volksfront co-leader
Constand Viljoen-who is considered
most the figure most amenable to the
election within his organization-ex-
pressed doubt yesterday that the new
proposal really guaranteed a separate
state for Afrikaners-the country's 6
million descendants of 17th-century
Dutch and French settlers-and said
"we will not be appeased by anything
less."
Buthelezi's position is the most
difficult to fathom because, as one
participant in the country's multi-
party constitutional negotiations
pointed out tonight, the government-
ANC compromise proposals are "ve
close indeed" to apackage that InkatW
itself put on the table last December.

94fAEANICoE S PRJ9QCBRXEAKI(

CUT
YOURSELF A
DEAL ON
A HAIRCUT
SAVE $1 ON YOUR
NEXT HAIRCUT
Simply bring this coupon to
Supercuts. As usual, no
appointments are necessary.
But come in soon, this offer
ends 4/30/94.
715 N. University
668-8488
7 days
Nood at participating shops.
Not valid with any other offer.
One coupon per customer.

Clinton explains 'Astro-gate' to DJ

LOS ANGELES TIMES
WASHINGTON -President
Clinton tried yesterday to clear up a
widespread misconception about why
he carpeted the bed of his old El
Camino pickup truck with AstroTurf:
It was just to protect his suitcase from
scratches.
In an interview with New York
disc jockey Don Imus, a regular
Clinton banter buddy, the president
explained that the truckbed was metal,
and "I carried my luggage back there
- it wasn't for what everybody
thought it was for when I made the
comment, I'll tell you that.
"I'm guilty of a lot of things," he
joked to the raucous deejay, "but I
didn't do that."
Inus, referring to Clinton's cam-
paign-year claim that he once tried

marijuana but did not breathe it in,
suggested the president's explanation
was a bit like "saying you didn't in-
hale." Countered Clinton: "It's just that
Ididn'tinhalein thebackofthepickup."
Clinton's memories of his El
Camino got worldwide publicity after
he told an audience of General Motors
autoworkers Feb. 7 about the "real
Southern deal" he drove in the 1970s.
"I had AstroTurf in the back -
you don't want to know why," he told
them. Few of his listeners, who roared
their approval at his story, seemed to
need elaboration. Clinton seemed to
wonder yesterday whether he should
offer any explanation at all. "I don't
think I should =disclaim it, really -
just leave it out there," he said.
Saying he did not want to be disre-
spectful, Imus wondered aloud why

Clinton became interested in the no-
frills Whitewater project. "That model
home looked like some place that
Tonya Harding's bodyguard holed
in," Imus said.
But Clinton defended the develop-
ment. "It was a little place where a lot
of working people without much
money were looking for a place to
retire and own some property in a
beautiful place," Clinton replied.
Imus wanted to know how Clinton,
who says he has lost 15 pounds, could
have eaten a "Clinton burger, a pas-
trami sandwich and an apple fritter t
size of a baby's head" on a trip to Ohio.
Clinton confessed to eating the Clinton
burger. He said the pastrami was in fact
corned beef on pumpernickel, and in-
sisted, "Hey, hey, the fritter-I had one
bite of the apple fritter."

IHow Do You WANT
YOUR HAIR CUT?
Th ETPICSi on Th B PRS SnTw!h ESPICE nTw!

-u
CS
m
0-
=r

whelafuse
110 OScumU~rvidlt
(AbOve Good-Time Chahey's)
AimAdiufMIl8104
Hous MOIL-Thus.9a.m.-10 p.m.
Fd.-Sat.9a.m.-11 .m.
SUL 1 LM WIL%
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TICKET CENTIER ptf
MUSIC FROM THI MOTION PICTURE SOUNDTRACK
Featuring songs by Bruce Springsteen,
Neil Young, Peter Gabriel. Sade,-
Spin Doctors, and Indigo Girls. .

i

THE
WAY
LOWS

cchapterhouse
blood mu sic
Includes:
WE ARE THE
BEAUTIFUL

CODE
Continued from page 1
no action taken at some stage in the
code process;
10 percent were alcohol com-
plaints in which only a warning letter
was sent;
16 percent were referred to other
University units, such as the Housing
Division;
26 percent resulted in some
punishment.
Of the 54 cases that resulted in
punishment, only two have gone to a
Religious
Services
AVAVAVAVA
AMERICAN BAPTIST CAMPUS CENTER
502 E. Huron (near State)
Wednesda: 5:30 p.m. - 7 p.m.
Dinner, discussion, study
663-9376 for more info
ANN ARBOR CHRISTIAN REFORMED CHURCH
1717 Broadway (near N. Campus)
665-0105
SUNAs
Traditional Service-9 a.m.
Contemporary Service-11:15 a.m.
Evening Service-6 p.m.
Complete Education Program
Nursery care available at all services
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Christian Reformed campus ministry)
1236 Washtenaw Ct. 668-7421/662-2402
[one block south of CCRBI
EXPLORE and ENJOY your FAITH
SUNDAY WORKSHOP:
10 a.m. - Lenten Worshop:
"Entering the Desert"
6 p.m. - Meditative worship
using Taize music
Rev. Don Postema, pastor
Ms. Barb O'Day, ministry of students
CHRISTIAN LIFE CHURCH
Schorling Auditorium
School of Education
SUNDAY: Service 11 a.m.
HURON VALLEY COMMUNITY CHURCH
Gay-Lesbian Ministry 741-1174
LUTHERAN CAMPUS MINISTRY
Lord of Light Lutheran Church, ELCA
801 S. Forest (at Hill), 668-7622
SUNDAY: Worship - 10 a.m.
WEDNESDAY: Soup & Supper dinner - 5:30
Study and discussion on human
sexuality 6p.m.
Evening Vespers -7 p.m.
John Rollef son and Joyce Miller
Campus Ministers
MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
730 Tappan 662-4245
[Across from School of Bus. Admin.
LENTEN MEDITATION SERIES
"Instrument of thy Peace"
Every Wednesday, 12:15-12:45 p.m.
SUNDA Y: Worship at 10:45 a.m.
An Open and Welcoming Congregation
Pastor Russell Fuler
ST. MARY'S STUDENT PARISH
(ARoman Catholic Parish at U-M)

PURIM
Continued from page 1
ing carnivals and masquerade parties.
First-year LSA students Debra
Chopp and Danny Schwartz said they
will be spending Purim with friends
at Columbia University. "We'll go to
a costume party and probably drink a
lot," Schwartz said. The Purim cus-
tom Schwartz referred to calls for
drinking until one is unable to tell the
difference between Haman and
Mordechai.
Because Purim occurs this year
during Spring Break, the Hillel Foun-

student hearing panel.
Kight criticized this part of the
process.
"With so few cases going to the
student hearing panels and so little
information about the process, the
code is simply not working," Kight
said.
This compares with 43 cases that
went to mediation or an administra-
tive hearing.
The regents will not formally hear
any amendments to the statement.
That's because two attempts to con-
vene the student hearing panel failed,

when a quorum could not be reached.
But the regents are still free to
amend the policy in any way befo*
approving the policy.
Power said the regents will at the
least consider the wording of the pro-
cess.
"If you can't get any amendments
through because it isn't working and
there is no way for students to amend
the amending procedure, the regents
will definitely need to consider that,"
Power said.
-Daily Staff Reporter James R. C4
contributed to this report

Correction
A story in the Feb. 8, 1994 Daily quoted Sojourner Truth Co-op resident
Bill Woelkers as stating that University alum Phil Pavlik sold the drug CAT
from an attic in that co-op. The Daily has determined that Woelkers and other
residents contacted by the Daily in fact had no knowledge that Pavlik, now
serving an eight-year sentence on federal drug charges, was selling or using
drugs at the co-op. Woelkers and co-op member Avneesh Gupta, also quoted
in the Daily story, believed that all Pavlik's drug-related activity occurred
prior to his residency at Sojourner Truth Co-op.

dation will not be sponsoring any
festivities. In past years, there have
been a variety of activities surround-
ing -the holiday, and many students
said they would miss Hillel's annual
Purim party.
RC sophomore Brian Stein at-
tended the party last year and said V
had a fabulous time. "We dressed up
and partied with a few bottles of
Manishewitz," he said.
Stein said Thursday he will be
celebrating Purim with his grand-
mother in Florida but he and some
friends are planning a Purim party
after Spring Break.

GIFT
CERTIFICATES
ALWAYS
AVAILABLE
In any amount.

students at the University of Michigan. Subscriptions for fall term, starting in September, via U.S. mail are $90.
Winter term (January through April) is $95, yearlong (September through April) is $160. On-campus subscrip-
tions for fall term are $35. Subscriptions must be prepaid.
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EDITORIAL STAFF Jessie Halladay, Editor in Chief
NEWS David Shepardson, Mmaglng Editor
EDITORS: Nate Hurley, Mons Qureshi, Karen Sabgir, Karen Talaski.
STAFF: Adam Anger. Robin Barry. CarrieBisseyaet Burkitt, Hope Calati. Jessica Chaffin, James R. Cho, Lashawnda Crowe, Lisa
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Alexandra Twin. Ted Watts.
PHOTO Michelle Guy, Evn Petrie, Editors
STAFF: Anastasia Banicki, Mark Friedman, Mary Koukhab, Elizabeth Lippman, Jonathan Lurie, Rebecca Margolis, Judith Perkins, Joe

r4

01

5.,.
HEAVY BAG.
Co*
Includes:
NO GROOVY
C' '~

I

LOVE JONES
HERE'S TO THE LOSERS
featuring "FRAGILE," 1L BLACK B00K.
and "PAID FOR LOVING"

I M.m

01

SIX
COOL
TITLES
EACH
MONTH

m

I;

II

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