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February 11, 1994 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1994-02-11

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2 -- The Michigan Daily - Friday, February 11, 1994

GM official speaks about Israeli auto marketI

By DAWN TAMIR
FOR THE DAILY
In the midst of peace talks, "Israel
is on the edge of an economic boom,"
the only American auto executive in
Israel said in a speech last night at
Hillel.
Thomas Olmsted is the director of
regional marketing operations at Gen-
eral Motors Corp., which is the first
auto company to make an investment
in Israel. GM created Universal Mo-
tors Israel (UMI) in 1993, as a result
of the unification of two former auto-
mobile companies - one owned by
an Arab and one owned by a Jew.
Israel has the largest automobile
market in the Middle East. Realizing
this opportunity - especially with
the Arab boycott that prevented other
auto companies from investing there
- GM jumped at the opportunity.
GM was able to work with the
Israeli government to reduce the taxes
that prevented many Israelis from
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purchasing automobiles.
Today, GM is driven by competi-
tive prices with the introduction of
other foreign imports into the market.
GM has introduced to Israel the "Sat-
urn philosophy," which emphasizes
the customer.
Olmsted added that this entailed
test drives, surveys and the ablility to
finance cars.
The audience responded with
"oohs" and "aahs" as Olmsted quoted
car prices. The most popular GM car
in Israel is the Pontiac Sunbird, cost-
ing $25,000. "A Cadillac Seville runs
over $100,000," Olmsted added.
"The economic development is
crucial to the success of peace in the
Middle East. American and Euro-
pean investment, and open trade poli-
cies will stabilize the region into the
next century," said LSA sophomore
Bill Plevan, in response to Olmsted's
speech.
Olmsted summed up his presenta-

YMCA
Continued from page 1
1988 projections. In 1992, the last
year for which figures are available,
the "Y" spent $526,000 on a housing
development that was projected to
cost $245,100 that year.
Mounting expenses forced the "Y"
in January to ask the City Council for
$25,000 to meet that month's loan
Spayments.
Council members approved unani-
mously, but with reservations. They
voted to reconsider the loan payments
in February.
The council planned to do that
Monday night. But Schwartz's dis-
turbing memo sidetracked discussion
Monday, and two days later "Y" offi-
cials learned that the city may pull out
of the loan arrangement.
This week's news apparently took
"Y" officials by surprise. When asked
yesterday about the future of the hous-
ing project, YMCA Executive Direc-
tor William Blewitt replied, "Every-
thing is just hypothetical at this point.

I'd rather not speculate on what's
going to happen,"
Hanging in the balance of this
delicate predicament are the YMCA's
100 residents, mostly single people
looking for work and minimum-wage
earners.
If the "Y" development closes,
they will further tax Ann Arbor's
strained low-income residences.
Sheldon and council members say
they don't want to be responsible for
the financial collapse of the YMCA.
"I think it is the intent of the ma-
jority of City Council to ensure --
whether the original agreement was
legal or not - that we don't toss 100
individuals out onto the street be-
cause of an error that was made in
1988," said Councilmember Peter
Nicolas (D-4th Ward).
Sheldon added, "We have a moral
obligation to untangle ourselves from
this mess without neglecting the resi-
dents."
But moral obligations aren't the
only factors council members are wary
of. Any action could spawn lawsuits.

Olmsted
tion: "With peace in th Middle East
on the horizon, we'll see great oppor-
tunity with Israel, Gaza and the West
Bank."

Condoms*
Cnoesgi f t f o r
Valentine 's
By LESLIE PAPPAS
FOR THE DAILY
Looking for the perfect Valentine's
Day gift? Well, look no further, the
Midwest AIDS Prevention Project
(MAPP) has the answer. How about a
unique condom variety pack, in honor
of National Condom Week?
Each pack contains a wide selec-
tion of condoms including a variety of
bright colors, mint flavored, ext
strength, ultra-thin, ribbed, studded a
even the popular gold circle coin
condom used in the movie "Pretty
Woman."
"Our condoms come in all kinds of
colors, shapes and sizes,just like lovers
do," said Craig Covey, president of
MAPP.
In addition to the condoms, the
pack also includes lubricant, a "Think
Safety" novelty lollipop and a "hc
to" condom guide.
Don't worry, all the condoms in-
cluded in the pack are safe and effec-
tive.
"All of the condoms are latex and
have a water-based lubricant," said
Cathy Sullivan the director ofdevelop-
ment at MAPP. "The safest condoms
have a water-based lubricant, because
oil bases wear down the latex."
However, it is all for a good tause
All proceeds from the condom variety
pack will go directly to MAPP, which
provides HIV and AIDS prevention
and safer sex education for community
groups throughout the state.
Condom packs are available by
sending $7in checkormoneyorderto
702 Livernois, Ferndale, MI 48220.

ISRAEL
Continued from page 1
(reach) a full agreement," Rabin told
Israeli radio. "I hope a month will be
enough. It could take a little more.
Remember, in our eyes there are no
sacred dates."
The agreement unveiled yesterday
raised many new questions. For ex-
ample, itdoes not explicitly say whether
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------------

Have you ever been attracted to another guy?
* Are you scared or confused by these feelings?
Have you ever wondered if you might be gay
or bisexual?
Would you like to talk to someone about this?
We are here to help!
Coming-out support groups are now being
formed for guys to explore these issues.
* The groups are facilitated by student-peer
counselors who have experienced the
same feelings.
" We meet in a safe space and confidentiality
is assured.
If you have any questions or would like more
information, please call the LGMPO at 763-4186.

Israel has the rightof "hotpursuit" into
Palestinian areas, or what will happen
if Israelis are arrested by Palestinian
policemen. Although there are broad
outlines of each side's jurisdiction,
Savir said, "It's a type of thing we will
have to work out in practice."
The Israeli and Palestinian negotia-
tors came close to agreement on a map
in which the Palestinians will get a
22.2-square-mile zone for the Jericho
district. They will also supervise nearby
Muslim holy sites and get private tour-
ism projects on the Dead Sea, while
Israel retains control over an ancient
synagogue. Savir said the map will
require final approval from Rabin and
Arafat.
CUT
YOURSELF A
DEAL ON
A HAIRCUT
SAVE $1 ON YOUR
NEXT HAIRCUT
Simply bring this coupon to
Supercuts. As usual, no
appointments are necessary.
But come in soon, this offer
ends 4/30/94.
715 N. University
668-8488
7 days
Good at participating shops.
Not valid with any other offer.
One coupon per customer.
How Do YOU WANT
YOUR HAIR CUT?

BAISDEN
Continued from page 1
DPS and University residents for
safety-awareness discussion. '
Identifying its theme as "work,
earn and learn," he also established
the DPS Student Work Assistance
Program (SWAP). Annually, the pro-
gram gives approximately 60 Univer-
sity undergraduates the opportunity
to work at DPS.
Baisden also served as co-chair of
the Campus Safety Committee (CSC),
composed of staff, administration and
students, which works to eliminate
safety hazards and meets monthly to
discuss safety issues.
He played an instrumental role in
theinstallatior the blue-light emer-
gency, courtesy and carport phones at
numerous locations around campus.
In August 1993, Baisden was
awarded aDirector'sCitation fromDPS
for "outstanding service, which con-
tributed to the reduction of serious in-
cidents and the heightened perception

of safety at campus events during the
fall and winter of 1992-93."
For example, Baisden worked to
provide security for all Friday and Sat-
urday night dances and parties held at
the Union. But, as Sloan stated, "he,
emphasized that students were most
responsible for theirown safety through
their behavior."
Sloan said Baisden was always
friendly with students and other faculty
at the weekendevents held in the Union,
but shejoki ngly regretted that he "never
got moving when the music played."
Baisden said most of all he will
miss the staff and students he inter-
acted with on a daily basis.
Officer Jim Sullivan described his
working relationship with Baisden as
"very, very close and very compat-
ible."
After working with Baisden in the
two-memberCommunity Relations and
Special Programs Unit for four years,
Sullivan said, "(Baisden) broughtdedi-
cation to the jobhelping the thousands
of faculty, staff and students here make
their lives safer.... He will be missed."

MA

LL

House passes special counsel law,

I

THE WASHINGTON POST
WASHINGTON - The House
voted overwhelmingly yesterday to
reinstate a post-Watergate law that au-
thorized independent counsels to in-
vestigate alleged wrongdoing by top
federal officials.
The 356-to-56 vote cleared the way
Religious
Services
AVAVAVAVA
AMERICAN BAPTIST CAMPUS CENTER
502 E. Huron (near State)
Wednesday: 5:30 p.m. - 7 p.m.
Dinner, discussion, study
663-9376 for more info
ANN ARBOR CHRISTIAN REFORMED CHURCH
1717 Broadway (near N. Campus)
665-0105
TraditionallService-9 a.m.
Contemporary Service-11:15 a.m.
Evening Service-6 p.m.
Complete Education Program
Nursery care available at all services
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Christian Reformed campus ministry)
1236 Washtenaw Ct. 668-7421/662-2402
lone block south of CCRBJ
EXPLORE and ENJOY your FAITH
SUNDAY WORKSHOP:
10 a.m. - Guest speaker
Rev. Leonard Hofman, General Secretary
of the Christian Reformed Church
6 p.m. - No service
WEDNESDAY:
9-10 p.m. - R.O.C.K. student gathering
Fun, food, provocative discussion.
Rev. Don Postema, pastor
Ms. Barb O'Day, ministry of students
CHRISTIAN LIFE CHURCH
Schorling Auditorium
School of Education
SUNDAY: Service 11 a.m.
HURON VALLEY COMMUNITY CHURCH
Gay-Lesbian Ministry 741-1174
LUTHERAN CAMPUS MINISTRY
Lord of Light Lutheran Church, ELCA
801 S. Forest (at Hill), 668-7622
SUNDAY: Worship - 10 a.m.
WEDNESDY Soup & Supper dinner - 5:30
Study and discussion on human
sexuality 6 p.m.
Evening Vespers - 7 p.m.
John Rollefson and Joyce Miller
Campus Ministers
ST. MARY'S STUDENT PARISH
(A Roman Catholic Parish at U-M)
331 Thompson Street
Weekend Liturgies
Saturday: 5 p.m.
SUNDAnV830n lm10 a m 19 n nn.

for House and Senate negotiators to
resolve relatively minor differences
on reinstating the independent-coun-
sel law, which expired in December
1992, for five years. The Senate passed
its version, 76 to 21, last November.
Political pressures for House action
on the law eased after Attorney Gen-
eral Janet Reno decided last month not
to wait for re-enactmentof the law and
named Robert B. Fiske Jr. as special
counsel to investigate the Arkansas
land investments of President Clinton
and Hillary Rodham Clinton.
The House debate centered instead
on a partisan battle over how to apply
the independent-counsel law, first
adopted in 1978, to members of Con-
gress.
Republicans argued that accused
lawmakers ought to be covered auto-
matically, in thesamemanner as 60top
officials in the executive branch, in-
cluding Cabinet officers, vice presi-
dent and president. The attorney gen-
eral must conduct a preliminary inves-
tigation of credible allegations against
those officials and must, if "reasonable
grounds" exist, ask the federal appeals
court to appoint an independent coun-
sel.

CONDOMS 6
Continued from page 1
UHS Health Education Coordinator.
"Not only is it a cute idea, it also
includes important information on
HIV testing and how to use a condom."
National Condom Week has been
very well received by students in the
past, Paulson said.
"There was a great response in the
residential halls lastyear. The condoms
were gone in record time!" she said.
Not only is UHS getting involved,
many University students said they are
getting excited to celebrate.
Students in Sociology 389-Gays
and Straights in the Community -will
be volunteering at many of the popular
bars and cafes on campus.
"We're very excited, becausetheW
has been a great response from many of
the places we've called," said Jenny
Beck the co-facilatator of this project.
"We already know forsure that we will
be at Rick's (American Cafe) some-
time next week."
VThey will be passing out basically
the same information as UHS, how-
ever they will be targeting a different
group.
"We're going to be right where the
action is, where people are actually
picking each other up," Beck said.
With Valentine's Day just around
the corner and romance in the air, make
this year one to remember. As long as
it's done safely, you have no excuse!

I f you have experience with Unix, Object-Oriented Program-
ming, C, C++ and relational databases, we want to hear from
you!
We seek individuals with diverse academic and extracurricular
backgrounds, the communication and analytical skills to trans-
late user needs into software solutions, and an aptitude and
interest in programming and mathematics. Candidates must be
motivated self-starters who function well under pressure, learn
quickly, and work well in teams.
Using cutting-edge computer hardware and software, our tech-
nologists give traders and risk managers access to enormous
amounts of information and analytical capability. We are look-
ing for individuals who will enable us to continue our techno-
logical leadership in the securities industry.
We will be holding on-campus interviews through the Engineer-
ing Placement Office on Monday, March 28 and Tuesday, March
29, 1994.
Pleae immediately fax or mail a cover letter and resume to-:

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