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October 22, 1993 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1993-10-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


RTS

'Show' combines
concert and curiosity

Ravikiran
Performance
Prodigy and viruoso, Ravikiran,
will give a performance and lec-
ture-demonstration of the rare south
Indian musical instrument called
"Gottu Vadhyam" or
"Chitraveena." The Chitraveena is
a stringed instrument, played by
gliding a cylindrical piece of wood
over the strings with the left hand,
atthe same timeplucking the strings
with the right hand at the other end.
This educational and unique per-
formance is sponsored by SPIC-
MACAY, a student organization
for the promotion of Indian classi-
cal music. The concert will be held
tonight at the Recital Hall at the
School of Music at 7:30 p.m. Ad-
mission is free; call Ram at 763-
8423 for more information.
Weisman Stories
Local Ann Arbor reading activ-
ist Joan Weisman, will be reading
from her book "The Storyteller"
tomorrow at Borders Book Shop at
11 a.m. Weisman, who founded the
Baby Book Club (a program de-
signed to teach young mothers to
teach their very young children to
read), is famous for her desire to
develop good relations between
people of different cultures and agess
through the enjoyment of reading
and storytelling. The reading and
book signing will take place during
Border's regularly-scheduled
Children's Hour.
The Circus is
Coming
Jim Rose, the master of
"freakiosity," will be bringing his
gang of sick and twisted comrades
to St. Andrew's Hall on Devil's
Night. Rose, famous for his Circus
Sideshow atLollapalooza II, is back
at it again, except this time, he's
headlining. Catch his merry gang
eat glass, pick up weights with their
nipples and skewer their cheeks with
sticks. Bring along the whole fam-
ily. Call 961-MELT for more info.

By NIMA HODAEI ,
It's quite possibly safe to say that
the Cure are now the mainstream, as
opposed tojust breaking into the main-
stream. What else could describe the
band's stunning rise to success over

Show
Directed by Aubrey Powell;
with Robert Smith, Perry
Bamonte, Simon Gallup, Porl
Thompson and Boris Williams.
the past few years? Remember U2
circa 1988? Ireland's favorite sons
were dominating the airwaves and
making quite a killing off it. Maybe in
not so bold or grandiose a manner as
U2, the Cure have culminated a sold-
out tour in stadiums across the United
States with their own little documen-
tary.
While U2 drove their pomposity
machine across America and threw
together "Rattle and Hum" as a
chronicle of the tour, the Cure stay
away from such gimmicks on "Show,"
their second feature-length concert
film. The movie features footage of
the band's two shows at the Palace of
Auburn Hills in July of 1992.
The Cure shy away from the be-
tween song filler material that U2
exploited so heavily on "Rattle and
Hum." There are no "candid" inter-
views with band members, no behind
the scenes recording sessions and cer-
tainly no backstage antics which usu-
ally only show the band "falling-
down" drunk before and after the
show. Rather, the Cure present noth-
ing more than on-stage footage.
Just like the Cure's previous con-
cert film (1987's "The Cure in Or-
ange"), "Show" does a fairly respect-
able job of portraying the atmosphere
behind attending aCure concert. From
the black-and-white scenes of fans
mulling around the Palace parking

lots before the show, to the incredible
lighting display during the concert
itself, "Show" captures the essence
behind the live performance without
coming across as over-dramatic or
excessively flashy.
Most importantly, the band seems
to be having fun on stage. Simon
Gallup (bassist) is often shown jump-
ing about, Porl Thompson (guitarist)
twirls around incessantly during a few
tracks and even mope-meister Robert
Smith (vocalist) finds the time tocrack
a smile or two along the way. Rather
than presenting the show as a dark,
gloomy event (a misnomer often at-
tached to the Cure), "Show" does
justice to the usually highly entertain-
ing and "happy" vibe behind one of
these concerts.
The Cure shy away
from the between song
filler material that U2
exploited so heavily on
"Rattle and Hum."
There are no "candid"
Interviews with band
members, no behind
the scenes recording
sessions and certainly
no backstage antics
which usually only
show the band "failing-
down" drunk before
and after the show.
Musically, the band has never been
better or tighter. Tracks like "Just
Like Heaven," "Trust" and "End" are
incredibly smooth in production and
execution. Most of the songs featured
in this live show are from the band's
last two albums of all original mate-
rial ("Wish" and "Disintegration").
Some older favorites such as "Let's
Go to Bed" and "The Walk" are also
included as could be expected.
All the instruments are prominent
in the mix and very little is fuzzy or

4'
.
ag
i,
tf
.F s
f'f
"Rattles and Hxum."e y a
glimpse of the band's tour.
So, fortunately, this isn't U2. For
those who were beginning to get wor-
ried, "Fat Bob" (AKA Smith), is fa
from being the next Bono.
SHOW will be playing at the
Michigan Theater Saturday througx
Monday.
I*

hIe L1aiiy
- MULTI COLOR SPECIALISTS
" ARTIST ON STAFF
" RUSH ORDERS
" NEAR U OFM CAMPUS
OSPECT, ANN ARBOR 665-1771
FF with this ad.
ing temble,
in beautiu/."
--ft
r, Merle Hubbard, John Schak
ohn Schak
)reographed by Debra Ann Draper
and sometimes
*kfh #inc~r'dvet4

"Show," the Cure's feature-length concert movie, is certainly not a rehash of U2

Struggle for the State
in
Post-Soviet Central Asia
Friday, October 22, 1993, 1-6 pm
Kuenzel Room, Michigan Union
University of Michigan
Speakers:
Roza Otunbayeva, Ambassador to the US from
the Kyrgyz Republic
William Fierman, Indiana University
Martha Olcott, Colgate University
Muriel Atkin, George Washington University
For more information, contact Center for Russian and
Eastern European Studies at 313/764-0351
or the Center for Middle Eastern and North African Studies
at 313/764-0350.
Public welcome without charge.

1

muddied, as often happens in movies
such as this. On screen, the music
never seems sterile, whereas the
movie's soundtrack (also titled
"Show") lacks spontaneity without
the accompaniment of visual images.
Just as in "The Cure in Orange,"
"Show" features some interesting cin-
ematography. The quick cuts between

U

1

F
ALL ~ ETS
QNY
a s

ALOHA ENTERTAINMENTS
STATE THEATREt
on State St. at Liberty - 994-4024
Manhattan Searching
Murder For
Mystery Bobby Fisher
2:00 4:30 2:00 4:30
7:00 9:30 7:00 9:30
The Carrier
Space Odyssey
11:301
(Friday & (Friday &
Saturday) Saturday)

black-and-white and color on "Never
Enough," make an already quick-
paced song even faster and more fran-
tic.
The mix of close-ups and wide-
angle shots also presents the concert
from a variety of different perspec-
tives and successfully utilizes the force
behind having over 16 cameras film-
ing the shows at once.
However, it should be noted that
this is purely a concert film in every
sense of the word. For people who
1217PPR
-4

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"SE Ti Mom AT Au Com.
ItsI "
Chris Mu d1 "RAVES", ROLLING STONE MAGAZINE
"Deliciously accurate in its portrayal of the
generation that fell between LSD and R.E.M:"
Juliann Gorey, US MAGAZINE

"Out of somet

By: Jim Morgan, Michael Stockle
Directed by J(
Musical Direction by Jerry DePuit " Chc
Touching, spirited,
kIM f .m Ic vtriow

I ~' I

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