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October 22, 1993 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 1993-10-22

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The Michigan Daily - Friday, October 22, 1993 - 7

Conference to showcase Taiwanese life

By SARAH KIINO
DAILY STAFF REPORTER
University students and other
members of the Ann Arbor commu-
nity will be able to glimpse traditional
Taiwanese culture on campus tomor-
row night at the 1993 Taiwan Night
Extravaganza.
The extravaganza is part of the
secondannual Intercollegiate Taiwan-
ese American Students for Aware-
ness (ITASA) Cultural Conference.
This year, the conference is being
hosted by the University's chapter of
the organization, Taiwanese Ameri-
can Students for Awareness (TASA).
ITASA is the umbrella organization
for Taiwanese American student or-

ganizations at campuses across the
country.
Mimi Huang, an LSA junior and
TASA member, said 141 students are
signed up for the conference from
schools across the Midwest, as well
as ones in Florida, Georgia, Wash-
ington, D.C., and New Jersey.
The conference begins tonight and
continues until students return home
after a Sunday brunch. The big day of
the conference is tomorrow when stu-
dents will eat a traditional Taiwanese
breakfast and then attend workshops
for most of the day.
The Taiwan Night Extravaganza,
to be held at 8 p.m. tomorrow at the
Power Center, will showcase Taiwan-

ese and Taiwanese American culture
for the general public.
Taiwan night represents some of
the cultural aspects of Taiwanese and
Taiwanese Americans, said Huang.
There will be two types of acts that
draw from both of these cultures.
A Taiwanese mountain dance,
Taiwanese singing and a martial arts
performance comprises the traditional
Taiwanese segment. In the second
part, there will be skits dealing with
issues of concern to the Asian Ameri-
can and Taiwanese American popu-
lation, especially with the
conference's theme, "Shaping The
Future: A Challenge For Taiwanese
Americans."

Huang said the theme deals with
issues such as how to "take identity
one step further," including how to
maintain a career and keep in touch
with a cultural identity. She said the
future is an issue of particular con-
cern for Taiwanese American stu-
dents because most of them are the
first generation born in the United
States, and therefore the first genera-
tion to deal with these issues.
Some of the issues addressed
through the workshops and Taiwan
Night skits will be stereotypes in the
media, political empowerment, the
"glass ceiling" in the workplace and
cultural assimilation versus plural-
ism, Huang said.

Riegle asks Congress to look
into Gulf War Syndrome

-

~

D0Ir Ait Vr
MnA ij

Haitians protest the return of exiled President Jean-Bertrand Aristide.
Clnon keeps tpower
over U s i
USe . . o S mn aiti

GAINESVILE, Fla.(AP) - Sen.
Donald Riegle (D-Mich.) has called for
congressional hearings into the "Gulf
War syndrome" to try to determine
what is causing it and to get help for
veterans suffering from it.
Thousands of Gulf War veterans
have complained of symptoms that in-
clude fatigue, swollen glands, sores,
gum boils, chest pain, rectal bleeding,
rashes and body aches.
Some have speculated that their ill-
nesses are the result of massive oil fires

in Kuwait, bullets made from depleted
uranium and the possibility that Iraq
used chemical weapons against the coa-
lition of nations involved in the war.
Riegle's office, which secured $5.7
million to study the syndrome, has is-
sued a 35-page report.
"The results of this investigation .
do indicatethatthereisalargebodyof
evidence linking Gulf War Syndrome
symptoms to possible exposure ofGulf
War participants to chemical welfare
agents and biological toxins."

WASHINGTON(AP)-President
Clinton won a hard-fought victory yes-
terday as the Senate rejected curbs on
his right as commander in chief to send
oops to Haiti.
Instead, senators endorsed a non-
binding compromise theirleadersmade
with the White House.
Both Democrats and Republicans
have pushed for sharp restrictions on
presidential authority duing the past
two weeks.
TheSenate, byan 81-19vote, turned
aside an amendment by Sen. Jesse
ielms (R-N.C.) to deny funds for any
tary operation in Haiti unlessClinton

had Congress' approval in advance.
The vote came afterHelms renewed
his scathing attack on deposed Haitian
PresidentJean-Bertrand Aristide, brand-
ing him a "demonstrable killer." Only
Republicans, including Senate Minor-
ity Leader Bob Dole (R-Kan.) sup-
ported the proposal.
The Senate then voted, 98-2, for a
watered-downmeasurethatsaysClinton
should seek approval from lawmakers
before committing troops to Haiti but is
not required to do so.
Sens. Robert Byrd (D-W.Va.) and
Mark Hatfield (R-Ore.) cast the dis-
senting votes.

L

:a
:o

0

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BEST
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* Selection
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619 E. Liberty
Mon.-Fri. 9-6
Sat. 9-5:30, Sun. 12-5

MAST'S

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Tender sliced beef with Chinese vegetables in spicy hot sauce
B. Hunan Vegetable Delight
Assortment of vegetables stir-fried in Hunan spicy sauce
C. Sweet & Sour Shrimp
Crispy, breaded shrimp with sweet & sour sauce
D. Spicy Chicken
Tender chunks of chicken in Szechuan Hoisan sauce
E. Hot & Spicy Pork
Shredded pork with shredded vegetables in chili pepper sauce
F. Chicken with Black Bean Sauce
Tender chicken breast stir-fried with vegetables in black bean sauce

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Sn 11anintiil 1O n

MAr w Card

For reservations or carry-out call 668-2445

I

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The Department of Philosophy
The University of Michigan
announces
THE TANNER LECTURE ON HUMAN VALUES
1993-94
William Julius Wilson
The Lucy Flower University Professor of:
Sociology and Public Policy and
Director of the Center for the
Study of Urban Inequality
University of Chicago
THE NEW URBAN POVERTY AND
THE PROBLEM OF RACEv
Friday, October 22
Rackham Auditorium
4:00 pm
SYMPOSIUM ON THE TANNER LECTURE
WILLIAM JULIUS WILSON
THE DA SKOCPOL
I.a/n ea Aa e, n1'.1

r 7 1 ,1.'
The University of Michigan
School of Music
Sun. October 24
Musical Theatre Program
QUILT, A Musical Celebration
by Stockler, Morgan, Hubbard and Schak
John Schak, director; Jerry DePuit, musical director
Tickets: $14, $10, and $6 (students)
Mendelssohn Theatre, 2 p.m (764-0450)
Department of Theatre and Drama
The Rogue's Trial by Ariano Suassuna
Jerald Schwiebert, director
Truebloodi Theatre, 2 p.m.
Tickets: $10, $6 for students (764-0450)
Dance Guest Artist Series
The Works of Pearl Primus
Studio A, Dance Building, 4 p.m.
Tickets: $10 and $6 (students & seniors)
(763-5460)
Faculty Recital
"Romantic Chamber Concertos for Violin and Piano"
POSTPONED
Mon. October 2S
Guest Recital
"New Directions in West African Music"
by Kwabena Nketia, University of Ghana
School of Music Recital Hall, 7 p.m.
Wed. October 27
University Choir
Jerry Blackstone, director
Schubert: Magnificat
Dvorak: Songs of Nature
Shvedof: Ne imami iniya pomoshchi
Faurd: Cantique de Jean Racine
Mechem: The Shepherd and His Love
Copland: At the River, Long Time Ago, Ching-A-Ring Chaw
Nyberg/Barnicle: South African Trilogy
Hill Auditorium, 8 p.m.
Fri. October 29
Faculty Recital
Edward Parmentier, harpsichord
Music of Bach and the Italian Masters
Blanche Anderson Moore Hall, 8 p.m.
Sat. October 30

(shlum * bire zha)
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noted for recruiting the brightest engineering and scientific minds
from all over the world. 2. 51,000 self-motivated, enterprising
achievers in 75 countries, totally committed to excellence. 3. A
place for self-starters in virtually every scientific and engineering
discipline to launch exceptional careers.
ENGINEERING
COMPUTER SCIENCES
GEOSCIENCES
APPLIED SCIENCES
PLEASE NOTE: Open to all interested students. Your attendance at
the Information Meeting is a prerequisite to our interviewing process.
Please attend. Refreshments provided! Casual attire.

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