100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 09, 1993 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1993-04-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

The Michigan Daily - Friday, April 9, 1993- Page'3

Lawyers begin
closing talks in
", "
ciilrights trial
for King beating
LOS ANGELES (AP) -Aprosecutor portrayed four
police officers yesterday as pitiless brutes who inflicted
street justice on Rodney King. A defense lawyer called
them "sacrificial lambs" and suggested King was to
blame for last year's riots.
During closing arguments in the officers' federal trial,
AssistantU.S.Attomey StevenClymersaidthe fourwent
"far beyond" the force necessary to arrest King.
"These defendants taught Rodney King a lesson,"
Clymer said. He added that they concocted elaborate lies
to cover up their misdeeds.
King was clubbed, kicked and shocked with an elec-
tric stun gun afterpolicechased and stoppedhis speeding
car on March 3, 1991.
A neighbor's videotape of the beating was broadcast
worldwide. When the officers were acquitted of most
charges in a state trial last year, three days of deadly
rioting ensued.
Clymerreplayedthe videotape, urging jurorstowatch
it repeatedly during their deliberations and to convict all
four officers of violating King's civil rights.
Defense lawyer Ira Salzman told jurors that the offic-
ers were denieda tool to subdue suspects when the police
department restricted use of the controversial chokehold
but never replaced it with another technique.
"These sacrificial lambs are foisted on the public altar
of justice to pay for negligence" by police management,
Salzman said.
Salzman said King was headed for Hansen Dam, a
place he had visited in childhood, when he was stopped
for speeding.
"Because of that, people died. People lost their homes
because someone'wanted to go to Hansen Dam without
interruption," Salzman said.

'U' honors community service

by Soma Gupta
Daily Staff Reporter
Facultymembers from theOffice of Community Service
Learning gave out awards to students for commendable
work within the community last night.
"It's an award from faculty for distinguished student
involvement in the community," said Jeffrey Howard, an
organizer of the event.
Nursing senior Jennifer Bastress, LSA senior Joel
Martinez, LSAjuniorDeannaNaugles, and Nursing senior
Catharine Quinn were chosen from a pool of 18 nominees
to receive the honors.
"(The event's) intent is to be a celebration and thank
you for those who have been involved in community and
service learning," Howard said.
This is the first year the award is being given. However,
organizers said it will be an annual event.
"I' mjust glad that all my hard work's being recognized
and the fact that the faculty supports us," Naugles said.
The award originated because other schools were
recognizing students' communityservice and the University
did nothing of this kind.
Faculty members decided it was time University

students were awarded for their efforts, such as involvement
in an HIV-AIDS education program, working with pregnant
teenagers, and organizing activities for minorities.
"We wanted to find some way of informing students of
faculty support for their service," Howard said. "We decided
to start small with an award and then maybe move on to
scholarships."
The winners spoke about the honors they received.
"I felt the responsibility to give back to the community. I
think it's very important that we serve as role models. Often
times we're fighting for the same things and if we work off
of each other's strengths we can work together to help the
community," Martinez said.
Many people at the event said they felt community
service is a good alternative to typical classroom learnings
"It is a particularly good way to learn instead of leamio
everything out of a book," Naugles said.
Prof. Mark Chesler, who is involved in the Project
Community Program at the University, believes service is&
wonderful way to educate because it asks the learner to
determine what is important rather than have someone t
them what is most important.
"The capacity to teach is within oneself," Chesler said
'4

AP PHOTO
Closing arguments began yesterday in the civil
rights trial of the four Los Angeles police officers
who beat Black motorist Rodney King.
He said King accused the officers of racial epithets to
inflame jurors. 'This case has never been about race,"
Salzman insisted.
King, who is Black, testified during the federal trial
that the officers, who are white, uttered racial slurs when
they beat him. Under cross-examination, King said he
wasn't sure they used racial epithets.
Clymer's and Salzman's summations lasted about
three hours each, pushing back the other three defense
lawyers' closing arguments and government rebuttal to
today and possibly delaying the judge's instructions to the
jury until tomorrow. U.S. District Judge John Davies has
said he and the jury would work through the weekend if
necessary.

- I
.,4

:..
.
f
t
ai
:

4
4
4

Activists clash over abortion

by Jen DiMascio
{Daily Gender Issues Reporter
* Activists on both sides of the abortion issue flooded the
Pishbowl yesterday.
Students For Life, acampus anti-abortion group, showed
video depicting aborted fetuses, distributed literature and
actively recruited members.
Meanwhile, abortion-rights faithfuls signed apetition for
the Freedom ofChoiceActat Pro-ChoiceAction's neighbor-
ing table.
The dichotomy combined with the video's startling im-
ages sparked debate among group leaders and University
students who floated by.
Students for Life head Bridget Hamilton said, "We're
showing (the film 'Hard Truth') to show people what these
'so-calledproducts of conception are.' Abortion kills a child
- it's not simply a blob of tissue."
Students for Choice member Sukie Collins said, "They're
,banding out false information. We're trying to be the voice of
reason."
Collins and fellow member Beverly Aist told students a
professional embryologist said the fetus footage shown in the
video was stillborn, not aborted.
Hamilton described her group's platform and said Stu-
dents For Life believes in "Pro-Life Feminism."
"We believe that pro-life is pro-woman because abortion

harms women physically and psychologically," Hamilton
said.
Most students who watched the film found it ennerving.
LSA junior Jeremy Schokora said he was disgusted by
the video. "I've never seen anything like this in public. I'm
against abortion, but it's more thatpeoplehave the right," he
said.
"You guys are naive," shouted LSA senior Ilan
Biederman, pointing at members of Students for Life.
Rony Guldmann, an LSA sophomore, said, "Actually I
can't stand to look at this. Yeah, it looks gruesome - a lot
of things look gruesome - that doesn't mean it should be
illegal."
But Hamilton said, "We don't get high off of grossing
people out, but if they get upset that says something about
abortion itself."
Justina Czarnecki, an LSA first-year student agreed. "I
think it's good that people see this because people don't
realize this is a baby," she added.
Hamilton said Students for Life hands out flyers once or
twice a month, but the video attracted much more attention
to the table.
Collins said Pro-Choice Action is also a frequent Fish-
bowl visitor, but said it was coincidental that both groups
were scheduled for yesterday.

Synch or swim
Residential College juniors, Karn Koto and Molly Shaffer perform at Canham Natatorium last night.
4
U.N. prohibits Yugoslav 'genocide:
THE HAGUE, Netherlands (AP) Boyle,saidtheMuslim-ledgovernment It was the first accusation of gene-
- Bosnian's embattled Muslim gov- would use the ruling to exert pressure cide to come before theU.N. court since
ernment won amoral victory yesterday on the Security Council to tighten sanc- it was founded in 1946.

when the World Court orderedYngosla-
via to stop acts of genocide.
But the 14 judges did not deal with
Bosnia's request foran exemption from
the U.N. weapons embargo against the
former Yugoslav states.
While the emergency measures can
sway world opinion, the court has no
enforcement powers. Its rulings can be
enforced by the U.N. Security Council,
although none ever have.
Bosnia's chief counsel, Francis

tions against Serbia. The court may
issued further rulings in the case.
The Bosnian government accuses
the Serbsof"ethnic cleansing"-push-
ing out Muslims so Bosnian land can
become part of a Greater Serbia.
Serbia denies responsibility for the
Bosnian Serb rebels and their tactic of
clearing. other ethnic groups from cap-
turedterritory. Serbia's lawyerlast week
accused Bosnia of misusing the court to
circumvent the weapons embargo.

"The Federal Republic (ofYugosla-
via) should immediately ... take allmea-
sures within its power to prevent the
commission of the crime of genocide,"
said the court.
The court, the U.N.'s principaljud}-
cial arm, also ordered the remnant of
Yugoslavia - Serbia and Montenegro
-to "ensure that military, paramilitary
or irregular armed units" under its con-
trol cease any genocidal acts.

4

'
,
,. ^
S
t
t
..
F
I
i
1
t
X
i i
f,
k
y
p
I
t
"
r
'

Friday
Q Alicia Gaspar de Alba, reading
from her work, potluck dinner to
follow, West Engineering Build-
ing, Room 232D, 4:30 p.m.
Q BFA Art Opening, Art School,
Slusser Gallery, 7-9 p.m.
Q Consultation for Student Lead-
ers and Student Organizations,
speak with peer and professional
consultants regarding leadership
and organizational development,
SODC, Michigan Union, Room
2202,8 a.m.-5 p.m.
U Drum Circle, Guild House Cam-
pus Ministry, 802 Monroe St.,8-
10 p.m.
Q Earth Week 1993, Illuminations
'93, concert, Palmer Field, 12-6
p.m.
Q Gay and Lesbian Film Series,
"The Salt Mines," "L Is for the
Way You Look," "It Wasn't
Love," and "Storme: The Lady
of the Jewel Box," Angell Hall,
Auditorium B, 7 p.m.
Q GoodFridayLiturgy,Canterbury
House, 518 E. Washington St.,
5:30 p.m.
Q Hillel,ShabbatServices,7:55p.m.
U Korean Campus Crusade for
Christ, Christian Fellowship,
Campus Chapel, 8 p.m.
Q Newman Catholic Student Fel-
lowship, Celebration of the
Lord's Passion, 12:10 p.m.; Sta-
tions of the Cross, 2:10 p.m.;
Good Friday Reflection Service,
7 p.m.; St. Mary Student Parish,
331 Thompson St.
U Northwalk Safety Walking Ser-
-:.. - l- L7.._11 'MC~I [MCC '0

ginners welcome, CCRB, Mar-
tial Arts Room, 6-7 p.m.
U Small Towns and the Culture of
Repression in the Eastern
Mediterranean, lecture, LS&A
Building, Room 4051, 12 p.m.
Q Symbolic Aspects of Political
Transition in Hungary: Some
New Anthropological Investi-
gations, anthropology
colloquium, LS&A Building,
Room 4560,4 p.m.
Q TaeKwonDo Club, regular work-
out, CCRB, Room 2275,7-8:30
p.m.
Q U-M Bridge Club, duplicate
bridge game, Michigan Union,
Tap Room, 7:30 p.m.
Q U-M Ninjitsu Club,practice,I.M.
Building, Wrestling Room,G21,
6:30-8 p.m.
Saturday
U The Domestication of Death, A
Conference Presented by the
Buddhist Studies Program,
Michigan League, Henderson
Room, 10a.m.-12p.m., and 1:30
p.m.-4 p.m.
Q Easter Services,EasterVigil,Can-
terbury House, 518 E. Washing-
ton St., 11 p.m.
Q Hillel,Passover Services, 9:30a.m.
and 7:45 p.m.
U Matthaei Botanical Gardens,
Trail Tour, 1800 Dixboro Rd., 2
p.m.
Q Newman Catholic Student Par-
ish, Into Light, 8 a.m.; Easter
Choir Rehearsal, 9:30a.m.; Eas-

11:30 p.m.
Q U-M Shotokan Karate, practice,
CCRB, small gym, 10 a.m.-12
p.m.
Sunday
Q Alpha Phi Omega, chapter meet-
ing, Michigan Union, Kuenzel
Room, 8 p.m.
Q Art Museum, Sunday Tour,"Ide-
als of Beauty," Information Desk,
2 p.m.
Q Ballroom Dance Club, CCRB,
Dance Room, 7-9 p.m.
Q Christian Life Church, Sunday
church service, School of Educa-
tion, Schorling Auditorium, 11
a.m.
Q Easter Festival, music and lec-
ture, Rudolf Steiner Institute,
1923 Geddes Ave., 8 p.m.
Q Easter Services, Sunday Holy Eu-
charist, 5 p.m.; Easter Dinner, 6
p.m.; Canterbury House, 518 E.
Washington St.
Q Hillel, Passover Services, 7:55
p.m.; Israeli Dancing, 8-10 p.m.
Q Jazz Combos, Michigan League,
Buffet Room, 5:30 p.m.
U Matthaei Botanical Gardens,
Conservatory Tour, 1800
Dixboro Rd., 10:30 and 11:30
a.m., and 2 and 3 p.m.
U Northwalk Safety Walking Ser-
vice, Bursley Hall, 763-9255, 8
p.m.-1:30 a.m.
Q Peer Counseling, U-M Counsel-
ing Services, 764-8433
Q Safewalk Safety Walking Ser-
vice, UGLi, lobby, 936-1000, 8
p.m.-1:30 a.m.

Howe's
FANTASY
BASEBALL
REPORT .
For the National League
CALL FOR FREE SAMPLE COPY OR
SEND $5 FOR OUR DRAFT PREVIEW
Strategies over 30 Payer ones
"The analysis is right on target.-
- Jayson Stark, Baseball America
1-800-793-5517
HFBR, Box 611, Narberth, PA 19072

A

pril 10th

11

C2JIIJFESTU

PRESENTS

Holiday
2900 Jac
Ann Ar
10:OOA
Admissi

ANN ARBOR COMICBOOK SHOW
Special Guests:
Inn Mark Moretti Artis
ckson Rd. I-94 Exit 172 E-T.-.E -.R- N - A-'L
bor, MI
M-4:OOPM W A

a
f
4
d
8
4
6
#
#
9
it of +
#
k
t
#
6

on: $2.00

I wl

t

4

BEST Pu~gRICESq IN TOWN!BE S RIE I TW!! BE*S RS I O

WA 7Cc use
RECORDS
W! ARE A
11140 South University
(Above Good-Time Charley's)
Ann Arbor, MI 48104
Ph: 663-5800
Hsoom Moo:-Thom . 1.-1o0.m1.
Sao.1Sa.m."L8 p.m

ONE
GREAT
VOICE!
SHE WILL BE PERFORMING AT HILL
AUDITORIUM SATURDAY NIGHT AT &:0 P.M!

.

r

18th C
Cec
CD ONLY!
THIS ALONG WITH ALL HER CDs

DLOVE ME
entury Italian Songs
.-ila Bartoli

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan