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March 26, 1993 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1993-03-26

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Page 2-The Michigan Daily- Friday, March 26, 1993

Polakow: TAs must see students' baggage

by Peter Matthews
Daily Staff Reporter
Teachers inmulticultural classrooms
often confront racism, ethnocentrism,
sexism, classism, and homophobia.
Valerie Polakow, an associate pro-
fessor of teacher education at Eastern
Michigan University and author of two
books on education, discussed these
obstacles at a lecture at Rackham Audi-
torium yesterday.
The LSA teaching assistant (TA)
training program invited Polakow to
speak on "Teaching as a Critical Dia-
logue: Implications for Multicultural
Education."
Polakow told a group - composed
mostly of University TAs - that many

societalprejudices begin as early as grade
school.
'We are taking on a system that has
succeeded in segregating classes by race
and socioeconomic status - an educa-
tional system that reinforces rather than
destroys stereotypes."
She added that students must try to
tackle racism and sexism when they
reach college.
"We must not underestimate the
degree of negative impact on students
during their pre-college education,"
Polakow said, "and if they don't con-
front these issues in the college class-
room it's unlikely they ever will."
Polakow warned against retaining a
"romantic notion of childhood" while

noting the difficulty inherent in com-
municating with students "due to the
subordinate power relationship (be-
tween students and their instructors.)"
She said, "We must challenge (stu-
dents') belief systems, we must create a
counter-pedagogy, we have to assume
cultural clashes and racism." She added
that instructors must be prepared for the
fact that students in the classroom may
have histories of physical, sexual, and/
or psychological abuse.
Polakow said she hopes the move
will result in students who better under-
stand, accept and communicate with
those who have been traditionally
marginalized within American culture
and schools.

SUSPENSION
Continued from page 1
given that this has happened, would
interfere with the academics of the
program," Antieau added.
But Schwartz said this is not suffi-
cient cause for suspension.
"I don't think it's appropriate to
suspend him because people are going
tobe uncomfortable inclass," Schwartz
said. "He ought to be allowed to con-
tinue his academic pursuits pending a
hearing to determine whether or not he
violated the policy."
The case will be presented to a
student hearing panel Monday after-
noon. Associate English Prof. Peter
Bauland, who could notbe reached for
comment, will facilitate the panel.
Six students have been chosen ran-
domly from a pool of 50 to hear the
case. They include three men and three
women, four of whom are white, one is
Black and one is Hispanic. Four are
graduate students and two are under-
graduates.

'U, receives 3 more
policy violations

by Jennifer Silverberg
Daily Administration Reporter
Nearly threemonthsaftertheState-
ment of Student Rights and Respon-
sibilities went into effect, the Univer-
sity is now ready to begin the policy's
judicial process.
Delores Sloan, director of coun-
seling services, will mediate the first
case today. Mary Lou Antieau, judi-
cial advisor of the policy, is respon-
sible for choosing mediators to hear
complaints of policy violations.
The case involves a male under-
graduate charged with physically as-
saulting another male undergraduate.
The incident allegedly occurred in a
residence hall.
Three other new cases involving
policy violations have also been pre-
sented to Antieau.
Two male LSA students filed

complaints against their third
housemate forphysical assaultand
battery.
The complainants filed separate
reports because each had slightly
different interactions with the ac-
cused, Antieau said.
Antieau has met with the com-
plainants and is in the process of
notifying the accused.
Amale LSA sophomore and a
male LSA junior have been accused
of illegal entry into University fa-
cilities and unauthorized taking or
possession of University property or
services.
The property in question was
University computer equipment.
Amale LSA first-year student
has been accused of fraud against
the University for using the Entrde
Plus card of a female undergraduate.

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LSA sophomore Donna Bryan said
she joined Queer Action because of its
political focus.
"I am already involved in a queer
social group and I've enjoyed its ben-
efits," Bryan said. "Now it's time for
pay backs and getting involved politi-
cally."
The group's mission is to be an anti-
racist, inclusive direct-action group for
"queers." Member Susan Kane said she
realizes many people may think "queer"
is a derogatory term, but the contro-
versy is sometimes unwarranted.
"I think (the term) came about be-
WEEKEND
Continued from page 1
the gains women have been making
around the country in the last year.
"Women are vocal on social issues
on campus. A lot of people wanted the
focus of the weekend to be political,"
said Shreerekha Pillai, an East Quad
resident fellow (RF).
RF Brian Spolarich said the topic of
"Women in Social Change" gave orga-
nizers freedom to choose events that
would highlight the achievements of
women activists.
"Women can enact change in their
lives or the world around them,"
Spolarich said. "It's an important event
at the University because it contains a
lot of food for thought."
The events begin tonight with a
women's coffeehouse, organized by RF
Tiffany Nguyen. Nguyen saidEastQuad
holds a coffeehouse every month, but
today's event will focus specifically on
women.
"Women can share a lot of things in
a supportive environment," Nguyen
said. "We will be sharing music, poetry,
dramatic readings -anything that ties
into a person's individual progress."
Tomorrow, people will be able to
take part in a community service project.
Participants will go to a local women's
shelter to spend the afternoon with its
residents.
Later, East Quad will host a health
and body image awareness workshop,
facilitated by a clinical social worker

cause we're tired of saying 'lesbians,
gay males, and bisexuals' so much,"
Kane said. "'Queer' is just one syl-
lable."
Kane also stressed the importance
of the group's having MSA recogni-
tion. "You really can't get anything
without approval - like funding or
rooms in the Union," she added.
Beyer said he is worried about the
safety of the banner because of
homophobic attitudes at the Univer-
sity.
"Gay men, lesbians and bisexuals
are not definitely under attack politi-
cally in this country. It's not an excep-
tion on this campus," he said. "People
would take it down out of hatred,
anger and resentment."

{
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4

and two students who have experi-
encedeating disorders.
RFShelley Emerson said the work-
shop will discuss the phenomenon by
which women spend'so much time
and energy trying to conform to
society's idealized images that they
have little time to create social change.
"The workshop points out the
prominence of the images in society
that are difficult to conform to,"
Emerson said. "It's an awareness pro-
gram about how we're influenced."
Tomorrow nightwill featureafilm
festival, including Jean Kilbourne's
"Killing Us Softly" and "Still Killing
Us Softly." The movie "Thelma and-
Louise" may also be shown. Eachp0
film discusses women'srolesandhow
society defines them, organizers said.
Two paneldiscussions willbeheld
on the last day of the event. The first
will be facilitated by female graduate
students who are local activists.
The second features speakers who
will talk about the role of women in
activism and social change. Invited
guests include Sen. Lana Pollack (D-
Ann Arbor) and Acting Director of
the Women's Studies Program Anne

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Hermann.
Throughout the weekend, local
artists will display work based on the
theme of social change. Additionally,
people attending any of the events can
take part in an interactive art project
that Pillai said should be "very em-
powering."
All activities are free and open to
the community.

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Religious
Services
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(A campus ministry of the
Christian Reformed Church)
1236 Washtenaw Ct. " 668-74211662-2402
Rev. Don Postema, Pastor
SUNDAY MORNING WORSHIP:
10 a.m.-Morning Worship
CANTERBURY HOUSE
(The Episcopal Church at U of M)
518 E. Washington Street
SUNDAY
5:00 p.m. Holy Eucharist
6:00 p.m. Dinner
The Rev'd Virginia Peacock, Chaplain
Telephone: 665-0606
CHURCH OF CHRIST
Non-Denominational Christianity
530 W. Stadium Blvd.
SUNDAY: Bible Study-9:30 a.m.
Worship-10:30 a.m.
Worship-6 p.m.
W EDNESDAY: Bible Study-7 p.m.
College Classes Available
All are welcome. Call for a ride!
662-2756
LUTHERAN CAMPUS MINISTRY
LORD OF LIGHT LUTHERAN CHURCH, ELCA
801 South Forest (at Hill Street), 66&7622
S-ND2AY:Worship-10 a.m.

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I EDtTORIAL STAFI

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h Dubow, E

NEWS Melissa Peerless, Managing Editor
EDITORS: Hope CalaIV, Lauren Dermer, Karen Sabir, Puri Shah
STAFF: Adam Anger Jonathan Boerndt, Janes Cho, Kerry Coligan, Kenneth Dancyger. Jon DiMaeclk Michelle Fdick. Mike Goecko,
Scoma Gupta, ichels Hatty. Grog Hoey. Nate Hurley, Sakii Janvaja, Sarah Ktno, Megan Lardner, Peter Matthew,Winl Mee"~.
Bryn Midde, Shelley MorrisonMonaQ ureshi, David Rheingold, Julie Robinson, David Shepardson, Jennifer S iverberg, Karen
Talasld, JennIfer Timnen, Scot Woods. Christine Young.
GRAPHICS STAFF: David Acton, Jonathan Berndt
OPINION Ern Einom, Editor
STAFF: Jule Becker, Oliver Gianooia, Sam Goodstein, Patrick Javid, Judith Kaflka (Editodal Assilant), Jason Uchtebin (Edtodal
Assistant), Bethany Robertson (Associate Editor), Lindsay Sobel, Jordan Stancil, Greg Stump, FlintWetness:
SPORTS Ryan Herrington, Managing Editor
EDITORS: Ken David*#f, Andrew Lavy, Adomiller, Ken Sugiura
STAFF: Bob Abrarmson, Rachel Bachman, Paul Barger, Tom Sausano, Chaies Breltros.. Tony. Broad. Jese Brouhard, Scott Burton,
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McIntosh, Rich Mitvalaky, John Niyo, Antoine Pitts, Mike Rancilo, Tim Rardin, J.L Rostam-Abad, Michael Rosenberg, Jasson
Rosenfeld, Chad Saran. Tim Spolar, Jeremy Strachan.
ARTS Jessie Halladay, Aaron Hamburger, Editors
EDITORS: Megan Abbott (Ffn)h Carina A. Bacon (Theaterk Melissa Rose Benardo (Weakend et.),Nna Hodad(Weekende.4
Darcy Locrn n (Books), Sco tt Staling (Musk), Midrae4 John Wilson (Fins Arts).
STAFF: Laura Mantas, Jon Allahuil Greg Bles, Alexandra Bolter, Andrew Caln, Jason Carro, Rich Cho. Andy Dclan, Geoff Eads,
Tom Erlewino, Camilo Fontedila, Jody Frank, Charlotte Garry, Steve Knowlton, Kristen Knudsen, Karen Loo, Alisen Levy, John R
Ryboc, Koren Schweilzer, Elizabeth Shaw, Michael Thompson, Jason Vigna, Midelle Weger, Sarah Weidman, *0lk Wetler, Josh
Worth, Kim Yaged.
PHOTO Kristoffer Gillette, Michelle Guy, Editors
STAFF: Erik Angermeie, Anastasia Banickd, Josh Deth, Susan lsaak, Douglas Kanter, Elizabeth Lppman, Healher Lowman.
Rebecca Margolis, Peter Matthews, Sharon Musher, Evan Petri, Moly Stevens.

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