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January 29, 1993 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1993-01-29

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Page 2-The Michigan Daily- Friday, January 29, 1993

HOUSE
Continued from page 1
"We have to form different coali-
tions across party lines to deal with
the critical social problems ahead of
us. "
The conference - to be held at
Michigan State University - was
originally open only to female legis-
lators. However, the conference
planners decided to invite the entire
state legislature.
At the opening session, Rep.
Rivers criticized a Republican par-
liamentary move to take credit for
opposing the pay increase.
After first term Democratic
member Rep. Karen Willard had in-
troduced a resolution to rescind the
legislative pay increase, Republican
Co-Speaker Paul Hillegonds recog-
nized a Republican member to in-

0

troduce a similar resolution rescind-
ing the pay increase.
"If that's the way things are go-
ing to go, I don't think we're going
to get much cooperation," Rivers
said.
The Ann Arbor News mistak-
enly reported yesterday that Rep.
Schroer had voted in favor of the
pay increase. Schroer spent much of
yesterday answering misinformed
criticism and was unable to contact
the News.
Rivers reiterated her support yes-
terday for overturning the state pro-
hibition against the distribution of
birth control devices in public
schools. In support of Ann Arbor ac-
tivists - who began distributing
condoms again in area high schools
last week - Rivers said the issue
was "a matter of saving lives." She
did not predict an easy solution.

CLINTON
Continued from page 1
the telephone with senators
throughout the day trying to re-
solve differences over the gay ban.
The problem, said one con-
gressional source who asked not
to be identified, is how to deal
with avowed homosexuals if the
ban is overturned after six months.
The administration was work-
ing with Democratic leaders to
block Republican plans for an
early vote preserving the ban. An
intense effort was under way to
win the support of Nunn.
Dole and two other key
Republicanssaid at a news con-
ference that they would not attach
an amendment codifying the ban
to legislation if Clinton abandons
his plans for an interim change in
policy.
If the president makes any
change, the Republicans would
carry through with their legislative
attack, they said.
"We will not wait if the presi-
dent does not wait," said Sen.
Strom Thurmond of South
Carolina, the ranking Republican
on the Armed Services
Committee.
Aspin said the six-month pe-
riod was designed to give
Congress time to hold hearings on
issues involving gays in the mili-
tary.

Lift of ban provokes heated debate
among military, gene ral public

I

Associated Press
From the military ranks to
mainstream America, a firefight of
divided feelings buzzed yesterday
over President Clinton's plan to
lift the ban on homosexuals serv-
ing in the military.
"Quite honestly, the only way
to describe the opponents' reaction
is hate," said Sam Gallegos, now a
reporter for a gay magazine after
he was given a general discharge
from the Colorado National Guard
in 1991.
At the Marine Corps base at
Camp Pendleton, Calif., Lance
Cpl. Richard McDowell said a
new policy would affect perfor-
mance.
"I wouldn't feel comfortable
with some guy who's gay, in a
fighting hole, in the middle of bat-
tle," McDowell said. "You would-
n't know if he'd be thinking about
fighting or be thinking about, you
know, you."
Army Pfc. Paul Rader, sta-
tioned at Fort Campbell, Ky., said
allowing gays in the military
"disgusts me." He said homosex-
uals on active duty would be
treated roughly by other soldiers.
At Malstrom Air Force Base in
Montana, Sgt. Marty Tucker said
the change is "not the image the
military should project."
And Capt. Tim Myers, com-

Quite honestly, the
only way to describe
the opponents'
reaction is hate.'
- Sam Gallegos
magazine reporter
manding officer of the Chicago
Navy Reserve Officers Training
Corps, said the close quarters of
sea duty would pose problems.
"I think it is very difficult for
the heterosexual and gay male to
live beside one another for six
months on a ship," Myers said.
"There is no place to go if some-
one is uncomfortable."
Frederick Seltzer, a gay jour-
nalist officer apprentice at the
submarine base in Bangor, Wash.,
says fears are misplaced.
"We are not sexual predators,"
said Seltzer, whose discharge is
pending. " We are basically nor-
mal human beings but the one
thing in our lives that is different
is our sexual orientation."
Capt. Pam Mindt of the Min-
nesota Anny National Guard came
forward in July, out of "duty Jx
honor," to tell her superiors she is
a lesbian. her discharge is also
pending.
"I was sick and tired of seeing
quality people being kicked out

because of her orientation," Mindt
said. "I've served 16 honorable
years, not marred with any type of
allegation of inappropriate sexual
conduct. Let our records speak for
us."
"Social change is never easy,"
said Joe Steffan, a top student at
the Naval Academy in Annapolis
who was discharged weeks before
his graduation in 1987 because he
is gay. Steffan, now a law student
in Connecticut, is author of
"Honor Bound: A Gay American
Fights for the Right to Serve His
Country."
At the 140-member Alexander
Hamilton American Legion Post
in San Francisco, World War II
veteran Paul Hardman blamed
"sanctified ignorance" for opposi-
tion to Clinton's order.
"Most gay men in the military,
you wouldn't know one from the
other," said Hardman, the post's
founder.
Most public opinion polls
showed the American public split.
"It creates additional headaches
on the chain of command, whose
main business is war," said retired
Maj. Gen. Joseph Griffin, the for-
mer adjutant general of Georgia.
"This is just another one of those
things that detracts from cohesion,
from training and certainly affects
discipline."

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Religious
Services
AV AVAVAVA
CANTERBURY HOUSE
(The Episcopal Church at U of M)
518 E. Washington Street
SUNDAY
5:00 p.m. Holy Eucharist
6:00 p.m. Dinner
The Rev'd Virginia Peacock, Chaplain
Telephone: 665-0606
LUTHERAN CAMPUS MINISTRY
LORD OF LIGHT LUTHERAN CHURCH, ELCA
801 South Forest (at Hill Street), 668-7622
SUNDAY: Worship-10 a.m.
WEDNESDAY: Bible Study-6 p.m.
Evening Prayer-7 p.m.
ST. MARY'S STUDENT PARISH
(A Roman Catholic Community at U-M)
Corner William and Thompson St.
Across from Cottage Inn
Weekend Liturgies- SATURDAY: 5 p.m.
SUNDAY: 8:30 a.m.,10 a.m., 12 noon
5 p.m., and 7 p.m.
FRIDAY: Confessions 4-5 p.m
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL, LCMS
1511 Washtenaw, near Hill Street
SATURDAY: Worship-6:30 p.m.
SUNDAY: Worship-10:30 a.m.
WEDNESDAY: Devotions-9 p.m.
Pastor, Ed Krauss-663-5560

i

RAD
DAILY~
CLASSIFEDS
EIGHTH
ISRAEL
CONFERENCE DAY
A fay-Long Academic Program Exploring Social,
C'uIUrl and Political Aspects of Isra el
SUNDAY, JANUARY 31, 1993
9:30 A.M. - 5:30 P.M.
Admission is free
Call for information 769-0500

Soldier's death shows
difficulties in Somalia

MOGADISHU, Somalia (AP) -
The screams were distinct - the
chilling call of the fallen. A sniper's
bullet in his chest, Lance Cpl.
Anthony Botello was carried from
harm's way clinging to the sleeve of
his comrade's camouflaged blouse,
his last link to life.
The manner of his untimely death
illustrated the dilemma of the nearly
9,000 Marines in Somalia: To show
restraint while going down the dark
and lawless corridors of a country
where the gun rules.
Botello, 21, from Wilburton,
Okla., had volunteered that fateful
Monday night as the point man on a
patrol looking for snipers who had
been firing on the Marines.
Rounding the corner, the 20-man
patrol made a left turn onto a path-
way shown on their map as a road

that turned out to be a trail dotted.
with huts.
On previous patrols, Somalis had
come out of their homes when they
heard the Marines passing through.
But when they realized they were
U.S. Marines, they went right back
inside.
Not this night.
Lamb knew when he saw one
Somali put a rifle on his shoulder as
he knelt and pointed it at Botello, 15,
feet away.
"I was five feet behind Bo," said.
Lamb. "I grabbed my rifle. All that
kept going through my mind was, 'I"
have to shoot this guy.' "It seemed
like forever, but it was all a matter of
a second."
Lamb fired four rounds at the
Somali.
"All hell broke loose," he said.
"Everybody started shooting."

NO BYOB, Free beer and punch
Student ID required
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houses south of Michigan Union

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POLICY
Continued from Page 1
problems, the alcohol policy has had
a positive impact on the Greek
community.
"I know that there are problems
with the policy but that we came to-
gether as a system and put together
something intelligent that could po-
tentially be a model for other poli-
cies seems a very big feat to me,"
she said.
Some members of the SRC added
that the committee has made amaz-
ing strides from not having any sys-

8

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students at the University of Michigan. Subscriptions for winter term, starting in January, via U.S. mail are $120. ,
The balance of fall term only is $40. Winter term (January through April) is $90. On-campus subscriptions for
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ADDRESS: The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-1327.
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tem of control to one that has limit-
ing restrictions.
"From my experience, it's work-
ing just fine," said Ryan Boeskool,
SRC representative from Alpha'
Delta Phi fraternity.
But houses are sometimes failing
to register parties, kegs are often
present, and other details of the pol-
icy - such as providing taxis and
checking identification - are not
always fulfilled.
"This thing has been around for a
year. It's time to enforce it. I want
people to be responsible for their ac-
tions,"Sweeny said.

EDITORIAL STAF

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NEWS Henry Goldblatt, Managing Editor
EDITORS: Andrew Levy, Melissa Peerless, David Rheingold, Bethany Robertson
STAFF: Adam Anger, Kelly Bates. Jonathan Berndt, Hope Calati. Kerry Colligan. Kenneth Dancyger, Lauren Dormer, Jon DiMaecio,
Tim Greimel, Nate Hurley, Saloni Janvea, Megan Lardner, Robin Ltwin, Wi McCahill, Shelley Morrison, Marc Otender David
Powers, Mona Oureshi. Karen Sabgir, Gwen Shatter. Purvi Shah, David Shepardson, Jennifer Silverberg, Johnny Su, Karen Talasm,
Andrew Taylor, Jenniter Tianen, Chastty Wison, Christine Young.
GRAPHICS STAFF: David Acton, Jonathan Bemdt, Johnny Su
OPINION Yael Citro, Geoffrey Earle, Amitava Mazumdar, Editors
STAFF: Jonathan Chat (Associate Editor), Mike Chau. Rich Choi, Erin Einhom (Editorial Assistant), Oliver Giancola, Sam Goodstein,
Judith Kalra, David Leiner, Jason Lichstein, Katherine Meres, Dave Rowe, Undsay Sobel, Jordan Stancil, Brian Vikstrom, Flint
Wainess.
SPORTS John Niyo, Managing Editor
EDITORS: Josh Dubow, Jeni Durst, Ryan Herrington, Albert Lin
STAFF: Bob Abramson, Rachel Bachman, Paul Barger, Tom Bausano Charlie Brettrose, Jesse Brouhard, Scott Burton, Ken Davidolf,
Andy DeKorte, Brett Forrest, Jm Foss, Mike Hill. Erin Him stedt. Thom Holden, Brett Johnson. Wendy Law. Adam Mier, Rich
Milvaisky, Antoine Pitts, Mike Rancitio, Tim Rardin. Michael Rosenberg, Jaeson Rosenteld, Chad Safran, Tim Spolar, Ken Sugiura.
ARTS Jessie Halladay, Aaron Hamburger, Editors
EDITO=RS: Megan Abbott (Fin), Carn A. Bacon (Theater), Nima Hodael (Weekend etc.), Darcy Locknan (Books), Scott Stading
(Music), Michaeel John Wilson (Fine Arts).
STAFF: Laura Alantas, Jon Altshul, Greg Baise, Jill Banks, Melissa Rose Bemardo, Mark Binelli, Jason Carroll, Camilo Fontecilla,
Patrick Kim, Kristen Knudsen. Alison Levy. John R. Rybock, Dave Skelly, Michael Thompson, Jayne Wawryzniak, Michelle Weger.
Sarah Weidman, Kirk Wetters, Josh Worth, Kim Yaged.
PHOTO Kristoffer Gillette, Michelle Guy, Editors
STAFF: Erik Angermeier, Douglas Kanter, Heather Lowman, Sharon Musher, Evan Petrie, Moly Stevens.

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