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November 09, 1992 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1992-11-09

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The Michigan Daily - Monday, November 9, 1992 - Page 3

I

Raliers ask students to
assist Bosnian citizens

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by Ken Dancyger
Daily Staff Reporter.
In the midst of a civil war that
has torn apart her country and de-
stroyed her home, Naza Miller and
her family left what once was
Sarajevo, Yugoslavia, to ask for the
world's help in reuniting her
homeland.
"The strongest army in Europe
is attacking its own people, and the
world is just standing by and watch-
ing it happen," Miller told students
during a rally on the Diag Friday.
Miller, together with her family
and students from the U-M Islamic
Circle, asked U-M students to do-
nate money and sign petitions urg-
ing the U.S. government to take a
strong stand in Bosnia.
"We're not here to point fingers
- we just want to stop the vio-
lence," said Kamran Bajwa, an
LSA junior and member of the

Islamic Circle. "The arms embargo
must be lifted in Bosnia."
He added that the fighting in
Bosnia has escalated to epic pro-
portions, noting that more than
77,000 people have died in the war
and thousands of prisoners are
being killed in concentration
camps.
"Students must know that they
are humans and the government
isn't doing anything to help," said
Ahmed Ali, an Engineering junior
and group member.
Protesters were also asked to
sign petitions to President Bush and
President-elect Clinton asking for
the urgent relief and support of the
Somalians in Africa.
"It's a sorry state of affairs when
you have to combine two causes
into one protest," Bajwa said. "The
United Nations is strong enough to
protect Somalia ... It's clear cut -
people are dying."

Because rebel forces continue to
steal humanitarian aid in Somalia,
the petitions are asking armed U.N.
peacekeeping forces to help trans-
port the aid to the thousands of
Somalians in need of food, Bajwa
added.
"Clinton said he would do some-
thing to highlight Bush's inactions
- the loss of human life has been
so large. It has to be stopped," said
James Piazza, a Rackham graduate
student and a member of the
Islamic Circle.
"We just want to send a message
to Clinton and Bush that they must
hold to their promises," added
Henry Miller, Naza's husband and a
visiting math professor from
Sarajevo who fled his country with
his family.
"To thousands of people, the
word 'tomorrow' holds no
meaning," he added.

After participating in a rally in support of Bosnian citizens, Amer
Shoeb signs a petition requesting more U.S. aid to the war-torn
republic.

1 - - -

Media mogul Turner speaks
to environmental journalists

r

by Gwen Shaffer
Daily Environment Reporter
Ted Turner - best known as the
owner of Cable News Network
(CNN) and the WTBS Superstation
in Atlanta - entertained an audience
of students and journalists with his
views on the environment and the
present political climate Friday
night.
The Society of Environmental
Journalists invited Turner to speak at
its conference in Ann Arbor this
weekend.
CNN is considered to be in the
forefront of environmentalism in the
media because of its weekly program
"Network Earth," segments run four
times daily of "Earth Matters," and a
children's show addressing
environmental issues, "Captain
Planet."
Turner's zest for the outdoors led
to his involvement in preserving the
natural environment, he said.
"I was always a person who liked
to hunt and fish," he said. "I hunted
ducks and noticed a serious decline
in their numbers."
Turner said he decided to become
a journalist despite a limited back-
ground in the media business. He

said, "About the only experience I
had was that I sold newspapers for a
quarter a day on a street corner when
I was eight."
By 1981, Turner said, it was ob-
vious CNN was going to be a force
in the media. As a result, he devel-
oped three principles he wanted to
emphasize on his station - stopping
the Cold War and working toward
peace, stabilizing the population, and
helping the environment.
"We did end the Cold War.
Normally humanity doesn't antici-
pate disaster until it happens -
that's how we deal with calamity,"
he said. "But we broke precedent on
that one."
Turner said the population prob-
lem is more difficult to solve be-
cause of religious and cultural
differences.
"Priests and bishops don't even
get married, and they're telling you
to have as many children as
possible," he said.
Turner said he sees the chance
for positive change in the country as
a result of a new Democratic
government in the White House.
"I am encouraged about the elec-
tion," he said. "America is in a

leadership position."
Jobs versus the environment is an
area Turner said has been misrepre-
sented in the media. "It is a handful
of jobs that are going to be lost soon
anyway, against saving the old-
growth forest," he said.
Turner provoked laughter with
his commentary on energy
conservation.
"We have too many lights on in
here - we only need one spotlight
on me," he said.
Despite rumors circulating
around Turner's home state of
Georgia that he might run for politi-
cal office, he said he prefers his
present position.
"Now I don't have to compro-
mise my values. I can do whatever I
want, within reason," he said.
"Besides, my wife was married to a
politician once and she said never
again."
Turner's wife, actress Jane
Fonda, was formerly married to
California politician Tom Hayden.
"This was really an enjoyable 40
minutes," said Laura Thomson, a
graduate student in Natural
Resources and communication.

Clinton's
transition
may affect
peace talks
WASHINGTON (AP) - Until
now, the Midwest has been more on
Bill Clinton's mind than the
Mideast.
But the president-elect will have
to tune in to that troubled region if
for no other reason than the Arab-
Israeli peace talks taking place at the
State Department in Washington.
Conscious of the fragility of the
peace process launched by the Bush
administration one year ago, Clinton
made a point after his election of
promising continuity in U.S. Middle
East policy.
Beyond that broad brush stroke,
campaign advisers say, little has
been filled in. Clinton, in the early
stages of forming his transition team,
has not decided who will handle
Middle Eastern issues.
Arabs and Israelis, resuming their
talks today after a week's break for
the elections, are eagerly waiting for
a signal - any signal - from the
Clinton transition team.
If they agree on nothing else,
Arabs, Israelis, Democrats and
Republicans are in accord on one
thing - that without an active U.S.
role, the negotiations will languish
and die.
"If they collapse, you're looking
at tremendous instability in that
area," said James Zogby, President
of the Arab American Institute and a
prominent Democratic activist.
Clinton comes to the talks with a
handicap. Real or perceived, the
president-elect is viewed as a sup-
porter of Israel who does not enjoy
the same trust or personal relation-
ships that George Bush has in the
Arab world.
Clinton "needs to enhance his
credibility in the Arab world," said
William Quandt, a Middle East ex-
pert and former aide to President
Carter.
Bush gained trust of the Arab
world, in part, by daring to openly
criticize the powerful pro-Israel
lobby in Washington and by taking
on Israel's former government over
its support for Jewish settlements on
Palestinian lands.
His decision to help Kuwait and
defy the powerful leader of Iraq also
won Bush some enduring friendships
among moderate Arab leaders.
Clinton has had little if any con-
tact with Arab leaders. He has spo-
ken of the "ties of conscience" that
bind Israel and the United States, has
stated his opposition to a Palestinian
state, and criticized Syria's President
Hafez Assad for his "egregious"
human rights abuses.
Zogby said he met in recent
months with Egyptian and Saudi of-
ficials. "My message to them was
you have nothing to fear," he said.
"There's no indication that Clinton
is any less committed to making this
(peace talks) work than Bush," he
said.

Take two
The grand opening of the State Theatre was postponed due to
problems with remodeling and construction. The theatre is
scheduled to begin operations soon.

.4

Republican party focuses on its future, possible 1996 candidates

WASHINGTON (AP) -
Sobered by their abrupt fall from
power, Republicans are arguing ve-
hemently among themselves over
what went wrong and how to get
back in sync with American voters.
While the election of a new party
chairman in January could offer
some hint of a new GOP direction,
e the ultimate resolution is four years
A down the road when primary voters
will pick a new standard-bearer,
,analysts say.

Angela Bay Buchanan, who
managed her brother Patrick's presi-
dential campaign, said Republicans
won't win again until they reinforce
their conservative base. She has
called for a new chairperson who
opposes abortion and supports
"traditional values."
"We can't be out there pandering
to different groups," Buchanan said
Friday on a TV talk show. "What we
need as a party is to stand for
something."

Jack Hawke, chairman of the
North Carolina GOP, blamed the
Bush defeat on "consultants who sit
in Washington and make money off
the party. Every decision has been
made behind closed doors with an
elite in Washington."
Hawke said Bush's economic
team was "out of step with the
things that should be done" and
Bush's advisers were out of touch
with the widespread perception of a
poor economy.

In 1996, the party may look for
someone who might bridge the gaps
between the center and right. One
possible suggestion is Jack Kemp.
Kemp is the Bush administration
housing secretary who in the past
has called himself a bleeding-heart
conservative.
In addition to Kemp, possible
1996 aspirants include Pat

Buchanan, Vice President Dan
Quayle, White House Chief of Staff
James Baker, Texas Sen. Phil
Gramm, South Carolina Gov. Carroll
Campbell, former education
secretary William Bennett and
former Delaware Gov. Pete du Pont.
Political analyst Kevin Phillips
said most of them would be factional
candidates without broad appeal.

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Student groups
Q Environmental Action Coali-
tion, meeting, School of Natural
Resources, room 1040, 7 p.m.
! Indian American Students As-
sociation, board meeting, Michi-
gan League, room A, 7 p.m.
Q Michigan Women's Rugby
Club, practice, East Mitchell
Field, 8-10 p.m.
Q Newman Catholic Student As-
sociation, Administration/Fi-
nance Commission, 6p.m.; Bible
Study, 7:30 p.m.; RCIA, 7 p.m.;
Saint Mary Student Chapel, 331
Thompson St.
Q Shorin-Ryu Karate-Do Club,
practice, CCRB, Martial Arts
Room, 7:45-8:45 p.m.
Q U-M Ninjitsu Club, practice,
I.M. Building, Wrestling Room
G21, 7:30-9 p.m.
Events
Q Annual Food Drive, Bryant

Q Campus Orchestra, concert, Hill
Auditorium, 8 p.m.
Q "Careers in Psychology: Re-
sume Preparation," lecture,
West Quad, Ostefin Room, 7-9
p.m.
Q "Focus on Michigan," photog-
raphy contest, City of Ann Arbor
Parks and Recreation Depart-
ment, accepting entries until De-
cember 1, contact Irene Bushaw
994-2780.
Q Guild House Writers' Series,
writers reading from their own
works, Guild House Campus
Ministry, 802 Monroe St., 8:30-
10 p.m.
Q Hillel Foundation, "U.S. vs.
Jonathan Pollard: A Political and
Legal Perspective," 7:30 p.m.;
Jewish Learning Center: "Israel
Through the Eyes of its Poets," 8
p.m.; Hillel, 1429 Hill St.
Q "The Marketing ofMisery: The
Selling of Addictions to
Women," lecture, Washtenaw

Union, Kuenzel Room, 7-9 p.m.
U "Pre- and Postdoctoral Teach-
ing Opportunities in East Cen-
tral Europe and the Former
Soviet Union," lecture, Lane
Hall, Commons Room, 3 p.m.
U "Synthesis and Processing of
Pre-Ceramic Polyallomers,"
seminar, Department of Chemis-
try, Chemistry Building, room
1640,4 p.m.
U U-M vs. OSU Blood Drive
Battle, Bursley Hall, East
Lounge, 3-8:30 p.m.
Student services
U Northwalk Nighttime Safety
Walking Service, Bursley Hall,
lobby, 763-WALK, 8 p.m. - 1:30
a.m.
U Psychology Undergraduate
Peer Advising, sponsored by
Dept. of Psychology, West Quad,
room K2., 10 a.m. - 4 p.m.
U Safewalk .Nighttime Safety

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