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October 30, 1992 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1992-10-30

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Page 2-The Michigan Daily- Friday, October 30,1992

CAMPAIGN
Continued from page 1
by taking votes from Clinton, he
added.
Florence Froehlich, a community
member, said, "I think there are a lot
of people who are saying Clinton
who will vote Bush."
Polls have shown Bush is
ntrrowing Clinton's lead in
Michigan, which has 18 electoral
votes and is a crucial state in
Tuesday's election.

Voters in Macomb County, home
of so-called Reagan Democrats,
haven't voted for a Democratic
president since Hubert Humphrey in
1968. That was alsothe last time a
Democratic presidential candidate
carried Michigan.
Bush also predicted victory in the
November election. "You guys are
fired up and that makes me feel like
victory is ours," he told the cheering
audience of about 6,000 people.
- The Associated Press
contributed to this report

Local libertarians call for limited government
Pwryfars legalizing 'uidiinleas aim 'endingfederal aid to chariliesslashingfordgn speung

READ IT WRITE OR IT RECYCLE IT
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Students, age 18 and older, who are eligible for university health service,
with no prior history of Hepatitis B infection or vaccination and who are not
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by David Carrel
Daily Staff Reporter
The Ann Arbor branch of the
third largest political party in
America, the Libertarian Party,
meets at Dominick's each week to
fight for the return of government to
the people.
Seeking a world of liberty in
which all individuals are sovereign
over their own lives, where no citi-
zens are forced to sacrifice their val-
ues for the benefit of others, the
Libertarian Party is active nationally
- supporting Andre Marrou for
president - and locally.
Libertarian Frederick Weihe, a
graduate student in physics and can-
didate for 54th district state repre-
sentative, said, "Not everything that

'Government is a threat to people's own
determination, where one is forced to play
along with someone else's vision of what
society should be.'
- Frederick Weihe
Rackham graduate student

is a good idea is a good idea for the
government.
"Government is a threat to peo-
ple's own determination, where one
is forced to play along with someone
else's vision of what society should
be," Weihe said.
Stressing the need to reduce the
government bureaucracy, he added,
"People shouldn't have to be com-
pelled to pay for a system that

doesn't help them and which is not
accountable to them."
U-M junior and Libertarian
Jonathan Haas said, "The founding
fathers of our country knew of the
dangers of big government so they
filled the Constitution with things
the government is not allowed to
do."
Weihe said he disagrees with

government regulation of individuals
and business, but supports a police
and court system which protects the -
people.
"Associations between people
should be voluntary when possible,"
Weihe said. "The way people help
their community, live their lives and
raise their families should be un-
tainted by force."
Haas said he views legalizing
"victimless crimes" - drugs, gam-
bling and prostitution - as an im-
portant cornerstone to help bring
America back to its feet. He said he
also favors ending government aid to
charities, slashing government aid to
foreign countries, and removing
government regulation from the
economy.

1
'
:f

VISITS
Continued from page 1
number of invitations to speak,"
Zindler said. "Clinton likes to speak
at good places where people will be
receptive to his ideas."
"It really gets people revved up
about the campaign," Zindler added.
Zindler indicated that Clinton has
made three speeches focused specif-
ically on campaign issues at college
campuses - including a September
speech on family values at the Uni-
versity of Notre Dame (ND).
Dennis Moore, ND's director of
public relations and information;
said that the school has a tradition of
inviting presidential candidates to
speak before the election date.
Moore said an invitation was ex-
tended to both candidates, but only
Clinton accepted.
"The whole purpose of this tradi-
tion. is educational," Moore said.
"We would be happy to have either
candidate visit us, but Bush's decline
didn't surprise us. We didn't know if
he would think it would be worth his
while to visit again so soon" he said.
Bush visited the campus the week
before the election in 1988, and
spoke at ND's commencement ex-
ercises last spring.
Moore said that while Clinton's
speech drew a full auditorium, some
students protested his visit.
ND senior Anne Marie Hartman

said that she was glad students had
the opportunity to hear a presidential
candidate speak live, but she ques-
tioned Clinton's inclusion of abor-
tion rights in a family values speech
at a Catholic university.
"I find it hard to hear someone
speak about family values when they
don't value life," Hartman said.
Bush headquarters said Bush's
late September speech at Pennsylva-
nia State University was one of his
most successful.
Karen Rugh, director of univer-
sity relations at Penn State, said the
rally attracted "people for miles."
She estimated more than 30,000
people came to hear Bush speak.
"People were so excited to hear a
real live president speak that the
Democrats were concerned that they
could get equal attention," Rugh
said.
'The analysis I've
seen suggests that
young people
disproportionately
support Clinton.'
- Prof. Donald Kinder
"Some of the students were sur-
prised, however, that he did not ad-
dress the issues of the younger gen-
eration," Rugh added.

POLLS
Continued from page 1
then," said Paul Abramson, institute
research fellow and political science
professor at Michigan State.
One national poll taken earlier
this week suggested only a 2-point
spread between Clinton and Bush,
although others showed wider
margins.
A spokesperson for the Bush
campaign in Michigan said the uni-
versity poll differed so markedly
from that national sampling that it
had to be flawed.
"It's not consistent with what
we've been seeing with other states,"
said David Bertram.
"Most polls are showing this well
within their margins of error even at
the national level. We've seen it
tighten up here very much in
Michigan. We feel like among likely
voters, it's a dead heat here in
Michigan."
Clinton's Michigan spokesper-
son, Jay Byrne, said the campaign
isn't counting on a double-digit lead
in the final days of the race.
"I think things have tightened up.
It's very difficult to tell at this late
stage of the game. We always ex-
pected this race to tighten. It's really
and truly a matter of turning people
out to vote at this point," he said.
But Abramson said the campaign
appearances in Michigan by Clinton
and Bush yesterday spoke volumes.
"The fact they were both here
tells you more than anything else. I
don't think Bush would be here if he
didn't think he had a shot at win-
ning," he said.
HALLOWEEN
Continued from page 1
lot of people and bars are having
parties, a lot of people are out and
about ... Be we don't have anything
like the major cities do."
One Halloween incident occurred
last year in a Northeast Ann Arbor
residential neighborhood involving
older children hassling youngsters,
Branson said. The disturbance was
not severe, he said, adding that he
could not remember many other
disturbances.
Fire Marshall Dennis Hasley said
he does not recall much vandalism
on Halloween either.
"This isn't Detroit," he said.

MSA
Continued from page 1
independent on the assembly, said
that he sees the large number of in-
dependents as a positive change.
"I think it's a good sign that the
parties are having trouble recruiting
because more people are running as
independents. If there are more
people who really want to do work
and don't have to worry about being
loyal to their constituencies, I think
it will help MSA," Van Houweling
said.
However, MSA Vice President
Hunter Van Valkenburgh, a member
of the Progressive Party, said he did
not think the party system had any-
thing to do with the shortage of can-
didates, but rather student apathy.
"It seems there is-a general apa-
thy or lack of knowledge in regard to
MSA. There's a low turn out in,
elections and we have trouble filling,
spots, including those appointed by
the Campus Governance
Committee," Van Valkenburgh said.
"I don't think it's the parties. We
haven't engineered a system so it
can only .be two parties like the
Democrats and Republicans. It's not,
like that. There's plenty of room for
independents to win," he added.
LSA Rep. Tobias Zimmerman,.
also a member of the Progressive
party, said he thinks part of the prob-,
lem is that students don't feel they.
have a voice.
"MSA is virtually powerless right
now thanks to the regents. I think",
MSA could have power if students,
and MSA chose to take that power,",
Zimmerman said.
"We're always ready for it, but there
has been no reason to expect there'
will be a problem."
About three Halloweens ago, he
said, someone set fire to a pile of
leaves as a joke. The fire spread to a
nearby garage and destroyed the,
eight cars inside.
Hasley said he doubts anything
similar will occur tonight.
"Hopefully students and residents
here in Ann Arbor are intelligent
enough not to start fires carelessly
for fun," he said.
Fire officials will also be pa-
trolling campus streets tonight and,
Hasley said they will be prepared to
prosecute anyone violating fire
codes or setting fires.

*1

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CA RY
IEAL-S
546 Packard/Hill
769-5555

Religious
Services
&VAVAVAVA
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Christian Reformed campus ministry)
1236 Washtenaw Ct. 668-7421/662-2402
[one block south of CCRBI
EXPLORE and ENJOY your FAITH
SUNDAY
10 a.m.- All Saint's Day Celebration
6 p.m.- Service of praise and music
WEDNESDAY
9-10 p.m.-R.O.C.K. Student Gathering.
join us for fun, food, provocative discussion.
Rev. Don Postema, pastor.
CANTERBURY HOUSE
(The Episcopal Church at the U of M)
SUNDAY: 5:00 pm Holy Eucharist
Guest Preacher: Pastor John Rollefson
Dinner Guest: Professor Barry Rabe
At Lord of Light Lutheran Church
(corner of Hill and Forest)
Offices: 411 E. Washington St.
Telephone: 665-0606
IVANGEL TEMPLE ASSEMBLY OF GOD
2455 Washtenaw (at Stadium)
Van rides from campus, info: 769-4157
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH and
AMERICAN BAPTIST CAMPUS CENTER
Huron Street (between State & Division)
SUINDAYS:
Worship- 9:55 a.m.
Adult Church School-11:20 a.m.
WEDNESDAYS:
Student Fellowship Supper
and Discussion-5:30 p.m.
For information, call 663-9376
George B. Lambrides & Ann Smiley-Oyen
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
Corner of State and William
SUNDAY: Communion-Douglas Chapel,
10 a.m.
Worship Service-Sanctuary.10:30 a.m.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Wash tenaw Ave.
(Between Hill & South University)
SU1NDAYS:
Worship-9:30 & 11 a.m.
Campus Faith Exploration Discussion
Bagels & Coffee Served -9:30 a.m.
Undergraduate Supper-5:30 p.m.
THURSDAYS:
Campus Worship & Dinner-5:30 p.m.
For information, call 662-4466
Amy Morrison, Campus Pastor.
LUTHERAN CAMPUS MINISTRY
LORD OF LIGHT LUTHERAN CHURCH, ELCA
801 South Forest (at Hill Street), 668-7622
SUNDAY: Worship-10 a.m.
WEDNESDAY: Bible Study-6 p.m.
Evening Prayer-7 p.m.
ST. MARY'S STUDENT PARISH

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STF BSNESAmyMlnr BsnesMaa

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DISPLAY SALES Amy Fant, Manager
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