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October 16, 1992 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1992-10-16

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Page 2-The Michigan Daily- Friday, October 16, 1992

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STALKING
Continued from page 1
gitimate purpose, such as investiga-
tion by a licensed private detective.
The proposed law would also al-
low victims to seek compensation
from their stalker.
Under current Michigan law,
stalking is not defined as a crime,
and victims can take no legal action
against their assailants.
"I think (the bills) are an impor-
tant piece of legislation," said Debi
Cain, director of the U-M's Sexual
Assault Prevention and Awareness
Center.
"It's an important tool that allows
women some protection under the
law that they previously didn't
have," she added.
Dave Cahill, legal counsel to the
House Judiciary Committee, said he
expects the bills to reach Gov. John
Engler before December.
"The administration supports this
package, and I'm confident that the
governor will sign it," Cahill said.
If passed before December, the
law would take effect April 1,1993.
Several U-M students said they
would be pleased if the bills pass.
"I think that with a specific def-
inition of stalking that (the law) is a
good idea," said LSA junior Mau-
reen Brown. "It gives some power to
the victim."
LSA junior Zachary Kushner ex-
pressed concerns about the bills.
"It's important to protect the victims,
but it's easy for both sides to get
carried away. It's a very fine line."
"The last thing that we need is a
law that people can interpret differ-
ent ways, or use to their own advan-
tage," Kushner added.
The U.S. Senate Judiciary
Committee has examined the issue
of ;stalking and is considering
proposing a model legislation that
states could follow.
IIE MICIIIGAN DAILY
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OPINION & PHOTO
Religious
services
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Christian Reformed campus ministry)
1236 Washtenaw Ct. 668-7421/662-2402
(one block south of CCRB)
EXPLORE and ENJOY your FAITH
SUNDA
10 a.m.-Morning Worship
6 p.m.- Evening Prayers
WEDNESD~AY
9-10 p.m.-R.O.C.K. Student Gathering.
Join us for fun, food, provocative discussion
Rev. Don Postema
CANTERBURY HOUSE
(The Episcopal Church at the U of M)
At St. Andrew's Church
306 N. Division

SUNDAY: 5:00 p.m. Holy Eucharist
6:00 p.m. Dinner
The Rev'd Virginia Peacock, Chaplain
Offices: 411 E. Washington Street
Telephone: 665-0606
EVANGEL TEMPLE ASSEMBLY OF GOD
2455 Washtenaw (at Stadium)
Van rides from campus, info: 7694157
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH and
AMERICAN BAPTIST CAMPUS CENTER
Huron Street (between State & Division)
SUNDAYS:
Worship- 9:55 a.m.
Adult Church School-11:20a.m.
WEDNESDAYS:
Student Fellowship Supper
and Discussion-5:30 p.m.
For information, call 663-9376
George B. Lambrides & Ann Smiley-Oyen
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
Corner of State and William
SUNDAY: Communion-Douglas Chapel, 10 a.m.
Worship Service-Sanctuary, 10:30 a.m.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
(Between Hill & South University)
Worship-9:30 & 11 a.m.
Campus Faith Exploration Discussion
Bagels & Coffee Served-9:30 am.
Undergraduate Supper-5:30 p.m.
THURSDAYS:
Campus Worship & Dinner-5:30 p.m.
For information, call 6624466
Amy Morrison, Campus Pastor
LUTHERAN CAMPUS MINISTRY
LORD OF LIGHT LUTHERAN CHURCH, ELCA
801 South Forest (at Hill Street), 668-7622
SUNDAY: Worship-10 a.m.
WEDNESDAY: Bible Study-6 p.m.
Evening Prayer-7 p.m.

AIDS
Continued from page 1
of females and 55 percent of males
used condoms during their first ex-
perience of sexual intercourse.
Female adolescents are in partic-
ular danger. Women are rapidly
closing in on the gender gap i.
AIDS cases and are projected to
constitute the majority of victims by
the year 2000. This trend trickles
down to female adolescents, who
comprised 17 percent of cases in
1987 and 39 percent in 1991.
Students said the role the univer-
sity should play in controlling these
escalating numbers is unclear.
Holladay said the university
provides a good service by giving
students general AIDS information
in their first-year packets.
Yet some students feel the HIV
virus should be discussed in intro-
ductory biology classes.
"Slip it in there somehow so ev-
eryone will find out," Flores said.
"It's biology. Why not? It's some-
thing we all use instead of how bees
reproduce."
The HIV virus is not introduced
in Biology 152, which is taken by
concentrators and pre-medicine stu-

dents. But Associate Chair of
Curriculum Steve Easter said topics
such as the immune system may be
introduced in the revamped Biology
154 curriculum, set to begin next
semester.
"The AIDS disease and the
whole constellation of issues around
AIDS is medicine rather than biol-
ogy," Easter said. Generally, preven-
tative features of medicine tend to be
localized in Public Health."
However, Easter noted that spe-
cialty courses such as the Biology of
Cancer are taught if a faculty mem-
ber takes an interest in formulating
and teaching the course.
"Using that as a sort of precursor,
it would be a plausible thing for this
department to offer the Biology of
AIDS," he said. "Courses that go
beyond that canonical set tend to be
initiated by individual instructors. If
someone were to offer a Biology of
AIDS course, I'd say come up with a
syllabus and that would be that."
Yeung indicated that the HIV
virus and AIDS are discussed in sci-
ence classes such as microbiology
and virology because the disease has
been researched so heavily recently.
"It's a classic case of virus," she
said. "If they're going to bring in

PROPOSAL
Continued from page 1
He criticized the fact that the 20
percent cut would be applied to rates
in effect on Nov. 1, which do not
take effect until April 1993. He said
there is no criteria to prevent insur-
ance companies from raising rates
every six months after the proposal
becomes law.
The rollback is not guaranteed,
but is dependent on the coverage
motorists choose to buy, their own
driving record, and the level of risk
where they live.
Critics argue that the plan would
leave severely injured motorists with
medical bills they can't pay.
Michigan Deserves Better - a
coalition including Mothers Against
Drunk Driving (MADD), the
Michigan Head Injury Alliance, the
Paralyzed Veterans of America, and
Michigan Spinal Cord Injury
Association - launched a crusade
against the proposal early this
month.
They said the elimination of un-
limited medical coverage is risky for
the consumer because most catas-
trophic accidents will easily exceed

$250,000.
"MADD is alarmed by the devas-
tating impact Proposal D could have
on injured victims of drunk driving
crashes and their families," said
Bethany Goodman, executive direc-
tor of MADD Michigan. "Proposal
D is a threat to every motorist in
Michigan."
But State Insurance
Commissioner David Dykhouse said
no state has required unlimited
medical coverage, and New Jersey is
the only other state that has a
$250,000 minimum required
coverage.
Under the proposal, which is five
pages long with 13 sections, auto in-
surers would not have to pay bene-
fits to injured motorists that are also
available under other health policies
- even if the motorist has paid a
premium to the auto insurer for that
coverage.
Opponents said this would mean
higher health-benefit costs for em-
ployers, or a shift of the financial
burden onto the driver with no
health insurance
Proposal D also includes a device
to cut down on nuisance suits by set-
ting new standards for an injured
person to sue in auto accident law-

suits. Plaintiffs would have to show
an "objective manifestation" of a se-
rious injury.
In addition, the proposal would
allow consumers to waive residual-
liability insurance, which insures
personal assets in the event of acci-
dent-related lawsuits.
It would also place cost limits on
fees hospitals could charge auto in-
surance companies for treating
patients.
AAA Michigan praised the
MCCA rate structure and said it will
build support for the proposal.
"It verifies what we've been say-
ing all along," said AAA Michigan-
Government Relations Director Bill.
Cillufo.
But Stoddard said Lansing politi-
cians are cynical of the numbers,
saying the association is controlled
by the auto insurance industry.
He questioned the timing of the
MCCA announcement, less than"
four weeks before the election. He0
said the legislature requested the
numbers a few months ago, but
MCCA said they were unavailable. +
According to a poll of Michigan.
voters early this month, 43 percent
said they favored the proposal and
42 percent opposed it.

other viruses, they should bring in
AIDS. It's something people can re-
late to."
Conscious of the possible con-
troversy that could arise from class
discussions on AIDS, she adds,
"AIDS is not a political issue in it-
self. It's what people make it. AIDS
is a virus. It's not politically
affiliated."
There is a stigma attached to
AIDS, Yeung asserts. "It's like
there's judgment brought down on
you," she said.
This fear of judgment extends to
taking a test for the HIV virus. As
the numbers of students seeking
testing and counseling have sky-
rocketed since Magic Johnson's an-
nouncement last year that he was
HIV-positive, so has an-accompany-
ing nervous anxiety.
LSA first-year student Elizabeth
Goldstein said she is not nervous to
take an AIDS test since she feels it is
extremely important.
"I think it's important to have
one. I plan to," she said. "There's
pretty much no chance I have it. It's
something that's important to me -
just making sure."

" Lunch Server
" Bussers
" Dishwashers

" Grill Cooks
" Pantry Cooks
" Broiler/ Saute Cooks

Apply in person at the restaurant:
Monday-Friday 9 a.m. - 6 p.m.
Saturday 9 a.m. -Noon
Max and Erma's - The Concord Center
445 E. Eisenhower Blvd.
Below the Olive Garden

...

Tue. Oct. 2

r

"Wed. Oct.
*Thu. Oct. 2
4
Thu.-Sun.
Oct. 22-25

The University of Michigan
School of Music
0 University Symphony and
Philharmonla Orchestras
Gustav Meier, Donald Schleicher, conductors
Brahms: Symphony No. 4
Rouse: Infernal Machine
Copland: Suite, Appalachian Spring'
Hill Auditorium, 8 p.m.
21 Northcoast Jazz Orchestra
Charles Young, director
Jazz classics and original works
North Campus Commons, 8 p.m.
2 Dance Guest Artist Series
Sharon Lowen
Odissi: Classical Indian Dance
Tickets: $8, $5 (students)
Studio A, Dance Building, 8 p.m.
Musical Theatre
A Day in Hollywood/
A Night in the Ukraine
Tim Millet, director
Tickets: $14, $10, $6 (students)
Mendelssohn Theatre
Thu.-Sat. 8 p.m.; Sun 2 p.m.
Theatre and Drama
The Birthday Party
by Harold Pinter
Vladimir Mirzoev, director
Tickets: $10, $6 (students)
Trueblood Theatre
Thu.-Sat. 8Tp.m.;Sun. 2 p.m.
4 Contemporary Directions
Ensemble
H. Robert Reynolds, director
Hartke: Oh Them Rats is Mean in My
Kitchen
Ruders: Break Dance
Rihm: Chiffre No. 1
Bolcom: 12 Etudes for Piano

DEBATE
Continued from page 1
a swipe at Clinton's proposed tax
hike, and to ask the voters to decide
who has the "perseverance, the char-
acter, the integrity, the maturity" to
handle a crisis in the Oval Office.
Perot stuck to his outsider's ap-
peal, saying that if the American
people want to solve their problems
"and not talk about it, I'm the one
person they ought to consider."
Clinton closed by speaking to the
voters in the audience rather than
looking into the camera. He criti-
cized the Republicans' "trickle down
economics" one final time, then said,
"We've got to grow the economy by
putting people first, real people like
you. "
ANN AROR I 2

The three men then shook hands
and moved into the audience to greet
those who had been their
questioners.
Early on, the candidates were
asked to give their remedies for the
huge federal deficit, and Perot said
scathingly that neither Republicans
nor Democrats were willing to take
blame for the nation's huge debt.
The majority of students inter-
viewed said they thought Clinton
came out ahead after last night's
debate.
"I think Clinton is the clear and
big winner. He knows everything
about what's being asked about
him," said LSA sophomore Paul
Ross.
"Bush was looking to hit a home
run tonight to boost his standings in

the polls. It looks like he is not doing
it. I don't think it's going to affect
his standing," said Brad Books, an
LSA sophomore.
Some students said Perot was
gaining ground on the two main-
stream-party candidates.
"I think Perot is doing well. He is
cutting right to the point with his
comments," said LSA first-year stu-
dent Oliver Wreford.
"Bush continues to avoid the
questions and has been on the attack
since the beginning of the debate.
Clinton appears relaxed. Perot could
be a great economic adviser but on
other issues he seems almost igno-
rant," said LSA first-year student
Patrick Javid.
- Daily Staff Reporter Johnny
Su contributed to this report.

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