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October 14, 1992 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1992-10-14

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Page 2-The Michigan Daily- Wednesday, October 14,1992

PEROT
Continued from page 1
may not win, a significant amount of
his vote may fold and go into an-
other camp or stay home," said
Frank Luntz, a GOP pollster who
worked for Perot last spring and
summer.
"No longer can you say that Perot
will just fade away," Luntz contin-
ued. He said Bush, dropping to the
high 30s in some recent major polls,
"has already dropped below the base
Republican vote of 41 percent."
An estimated audience of 16 mil-
lion Americans watched Perot's first
30-minute commercial. And several
major polls suggested that viewers
believed Perot to be the winner of
the first debate.
Perot's humor came across as re-
freshing and novel to many viewers,
but those who have followed the jug-
eared Texan's career recognized

many of his lines, including a quip
about being "all ears," as ones he
uses frequently.
Some of his less endearing quali-
ties could surface in the remaining
two debates.
Nearly all observers agree that
Perot can hurt Bush the easiest in
Texas.
Conventional thinking also sug-
gests that Perot's renaissance could
hurt Clinton more than Bush in
states such as California and Illinois,
Michigan and Ohio that he might be
unaffected.
GOP pollster Neil Newhouse
said, for Perot to help Bush, he
would have to enjoy a large surge
and not just a spurt, peeling off a
sizable number of Clinton support-
ers. "A big surge would provide the
kind of opportunity for Bush to win
those voters back."

REGENTS
Continued from page 1
probably be delayed. If there are
none, it would probably be put into
motion either by a vote by the re-
gents or by presidential action,"
Baker said.
Richard Kennedy, vice president
for government relations, said the
regents may also rescind the Rules
of the University Community.
Adopted in the 1970s, the rules
were designed to govern students'
non-academic behavior at U-M.
"They never went anywhere, they
were never able to put together an
enforcement mechanism and (the
policy) has no meaning," Kennedy
said. "For all practical purposes it
doesn't exist now but formally we
need to go through this probably.
"It's a technical question at this
point," Kennedy said. "It's being
suggested that we need to remove
this so it doesn't necessarily conflict
with any new policy issues that are
implemented."
If a vote to abolish these rules is
not taken at tomorrow's meeting,
Kennedy said it would probably oc-
cur at November's meeting.
In other matters, the regents will
discuss a South Campus Master Plan
which proposes renovations to U-
M's athletic campus.
"This is a new plan and is less
finished in character," Baker said.
"If there is discussion on that it will
be in general terms but I certainly
agree a master plan is necessary."
McFee said U-M's recent acqui-
sition of two pieces of land - one
on State Street and another near
Crisler Arena - necessitates
changes to the plan.
"My concern is that this plan
doesn't deal with the recent property
the university acquired. Those new
acquisitions have to be incorporated
into our master plan," McFee said.
"It's going to have to be updated."
A 1993-94 state budget request
will also be presented at tomorrow's
meeting. Robert Holbrook, assistant
vice president for academic affairs,
said the nature of the request will
not be revealed until the meeting.

0

ERIK ANGERMEIER/Daily

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A group of mushrooms are hidden under the cover of pines in the Arb.

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PROPOSAL
Continued from page 1
said.
Proposal C will keep businesses
in Michigan and attract new busi-
nesses as well as encourage people
to buy homes because investors will
know their assessment increases in
advance, Truscott said.
"People can afford their mort-
gage but can't afford their property
taxes," he added.
However, Ken MacGregor, a
consultant to the Michigan
Education Association, said propos-
als A and C will be detrimental to
education because the state
economy will not grow enough to
pay for the tax cut.
"It's either going to be a shift to
other taxes or severe cuts,"
MacGregor said.
The Michigan Education
Association is a member of
Advance Michigan - a coalition

formed to fight Proposals A and C.
Truscott said top economists
have estimated that Michigan will
have a 6.1 percent growth rule.
Proposal C only requires a 2
percent increase, Truscott said.
"We can't find any reliable
economist who thinks that will hap-
pen," MacGregor said of the growth
estimates.
The state has to make up the dif-
ference by either cutting state
spending, increasing other forms of
taxation or phenomenal growth,
MacGregor said. "It's a pie-in-the-
sky proposal," MacGregor said.
A study by the Institute for
Public Policy and Social Research
at the Michigan State University
found that if an equivalent of
Proposal C passed in 1984 and had
been implemented from 1985-90,
the General Fund contribution to
higher education would have
dropped $250 million.
Ruth Beier, associate director of

the institute, said higher education
will probably lose a greater amount
than predicted because higher
education funds can be raised from
grants and tuition increases.
Truscott pointed out that
Proposal C was placed on the ballot
through a petition drive.
"The people have sent a
mandate to the legislature to pay for
this," Truscott said.
Michigan Republican Party
spokesperson Bryan Flood said,
"Taxpayers have an opportunity to
do something about giving
themselves real property tax relief."
Proposals A and C offer over-
lapping tax cuts of 5 and 3 percent,
respectively. "We assume
whichever proposal has the most
votes wins," Truscott said.
The debate could enter the
judicial system.
- Associated Press contributed
to this report

0

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GRE
Continued from page 1
computers.
The computerized test has a 20-
minute tutorial section at the begin-
ning that teaches students how to se-
lect an answer and use the hand-held
mouse.
U-M students have mixed reac-
tions to the computerized test.
"I think it is a good idea. We can
find out our test scores faster and it
would be a more relaxed and com-
fortable atmosphere," said LSA
junior Kathy Puine.

DEBATE
Continued from page 1
But some students said they
agreed with the vice president.
"He changes his view so he'll
sound favorable to the crowd he's
speaking for," said Mark Davis, an
engineering first-year student.
"Clinton can't make up his mind
on this issues," added Seth Weldon,
an LSA first-year student.
Some students were critical of
Quayle's apparent concern about
Clinton's personal character rather
than other issues.
"Quayle didn't want to debate
about issues important to the people
because Bush has messed them (the
issues) up," said David Reid an
Engineering first-year student.
"Bush doesn't have a domestic pol-
icy and that's why Quayle wanted to
change the debate to a personal
attack."
"Gore dealt with the issues more
than Quayle ... the only things
Quayle raised were personal at-
tacks," Carter said.
Others found Quayle's approach
to be appropriate for the format of

the night.
"Quayle wanted to debate but
Gore wanted to give speeches,"
Davis said.
Stockdale exploded at one point
after Quayle and Gore argued, say-
ing, "I think America is seeing right
now the reason this nation is in
gridlock," adding that Perot is the
man to fix the system.
The political imperative was
clear for each of the three running
mates: to boost the fortunes of the
man at the top of the ticket in a race
that has exactly three weeks left to
run and shows Clinton with a dou-
ble-digit lead in the polls.
Stockdale stressed his non-
politician's status, and he stumbled
over his words periodically in a
demonstration of his inexperience at
political combat and perhaps his
lesser familiarity with some of the
issues.
"He may not know how to talk as
well but he's a hell of a lot smarter
than Quayle and Gore put together,"
Carter argued.
- Daily Staff Reporter Andrew
Taylor contributed to this article.

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