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October 09, 1992 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1992-10-09

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01

Page 2-The Michigan Daily- Friday, October 9,1992

COLUMBUS
Continued from page 1
has proclaimed 1993 the Year of
Aboriginal Peoples.
Assistant History and American
Culture Prof. David Scobey said the
way in which Americans think about
Columbus' voyage has changed
dramatically during the past 100
years. The Chicago World's Fair
celebrating the 400th anniversary of
Columbus' voyage featured an
enormous statue of his three ships,
Scobey said.
Columbus' voyage was seen as
"a symbolic event in celebration of
the progress of American society,"

Scobey said. People credited
Columbus with starting the chain of
events through which the United
States became a "new corporate and
imperial power" like those in
Western Europe, Scobey added.
Martin Pernick, associate history
professor, said that Columbus' ar-
rival in the New World was an
"unmitigated medical disaster."
Native Americans suffered large
population losses due to European
diseases from which they had no
immunity.
Pernick said because he is pri-
marily a historian of health issues,
he has taught the European influx in
this light for two decades.

SEMESTER
Continued from page 1
"Usually, it's Columbus that gets
all the attention. People forget there
was a vibrant, living civilization in
America. He didn't so much dis-
cover it as encounter it," said James
McIntosh, coordinator of the theme
semester.
The theme semester is the brain-
child of "Lying in Wait for
Columbus," a U-M and Ann Arbor
Public School faculty discussion that
occurred on the 1991 Diversity Day.
"I have always had an interest in
connecting the study of the United
States and Latin America," said

Judith Elkin, co-coordinator of the
theme semester. Last spring, Elkin
assembled a committee to set the
idea in motion.
"We've never had something like
this before. We've made a concerted
effort to provide a perspective that
you might not have learned about in
school 10 years ago," McIntosh said.
Elkin said the old perspective is
told from the conquerors point of
view and implies that Europe's col-
onization of America was a positive
force.
"People were talking about
progress, when the Native
Americans suffered terrible mas-

sacres, the environment was heavily
destroyed, and a large number of
Black slaves were brought over,"
Elkin said.
Elkin is also the project director
of "Jews and the Encounter with the
New World," a series of theme
semester conferences.
She explained that the Jewish ex-
perience in 1492 has not been seen
as important until now. She pointed
out a definite relationship between
the Spanish Inquisition and
Columbus' encounter.
"The Jews were expelled from
Spain on Aug. 3, 1492, the same day
Columbus left. Jews were banned

from settling in the new world, and
suspicion of their descendants con-
tinued into the 19th century," Elkin
said.
The quincentenary program, as a
whole, is making an effort to reeval-
uate the 1492 encounter.
"Big names from American cul-
ture from all over the United States
are coming in to talk. People from
all fields come to provide their per-
spective," said Juliene Mohr, a se-
nior concentrating in American
Culture, who is enrolled in the theme
semester mini-course.

0
0

TheB, ETI4PAI

PA7
by Harold Pinter

"The more acute the
experience, the less
articulate its expression."
Trueblood Theatre
(located in the Frieze BIdg)
Oct 15-17, 22-24 at 8 PM
Oct 18, 25 at 2 PM
Tickets are $10
Charge by phone: 764-0450
Student seating is $6 with ID.
Tickets on sale at
the League Ticket Office in
the Michigan League.

VOTE
Continued from page 1
valuable input," McFee said. "There
will be a code and I think there has
been a significant chance for stu-
dents to give input into this process."
Executive Director for University
Relations Walter Harrison agreed. "I
don't think anything would be ac-
complished by a referendum. We al-
ready have strong indicators that a
majority of students support the
policy and that's all we need to
know."
Harrison said a mail survey
showed 60 percent of student re-
spondents approved of the policy
and a phone survey yielded more
than an 80 percent approval rating.
"I have reservations about MSA
running a referendum," Harrison
said. "Such a small number of peo-
ple vote in MSA elections that it
wouldn't be representative of the
student body."
Kight acknowledged that only 9
percent of the student body voted in
the last MSA election, but said he

thought voter turnout would increase
with the inclusion of the ballot
question.
"I think most people don't vote
because they don't see their vote as
counting for much. If students know
their vote counts for something im-
portant that affects them, like this
code would, I think they would turn
out in greater numbers," Kight said.
Regardless of voter turnout,
Regent Paul Brown (D-Petoskey)
said he would be interested in the re-
sults of a student vote.
"It's something I would take into
consideration," Brown said. "I
would be interested in seeing what
students thought. You can never
have enough student input."
Some regents said a student vote
would be a consideration when vot-
ing on the policy.
"The regents are always consider-
ing the students' ideas but whether
they act on them is another ques-
tion," said Regent Deane Baker (R-
Ann Arbor). "They will vote for
what they think is best for the
university."

U-M SCHOOL OF MUSIC

ACTIVITIES
Continued from page 1
the contributions of indigenous
peoples.
Among the NASA-sponsored
events is a speech by Adam
Fortunate Eagle, a Red Lake Ojibwe
who led the 1969 Alcatraz Island
Re-occupation, which will be fol-
lowed by a music and dance presen-
tation. On Sunday, the group will
host a Diag rally and march at 10
p.m. On Monday, there will be sev-
eral panel discussions.
Pattrice Maurer, a board member
of the BMC, said the group's inten-
tion is to "use 1992 to focus on is-
sues relevant to the legacy of colo-
nialization.
TESTS
Continued from page 1
at the Kaplan center on Liberty
Street, said his center offers students
books and materials to prepare for
lectures and also unlimited lab use
with access to 200 hours of tests on
tape.
"A student can understand the
material - he just needs to put in
the time," Wilson said.
At Kaplan, that time amounts to
36 class hours, plus additional lab
use, home preparation, and taking
old tests. The Princeton Review has
a similar schedule.
LSA senior Jason Barrett said he
is trying to achieve a high score on
the GRE so he can get into graduate
school at Yale University or at the
U-M.
Barrett was also skeptical about
the tests. "The GRE is ridiculous,"
said Barrett, who has had no college
math, yet consistently places in the
top 10 percentile on the math
section.

Department of Theatre and Drama
* ZZ0
Join us for live jazz
performances every
Sunday night in the
Michigan League
Buffet-.
Deli sandwiches,
salads, & homemade
soups served 4-6pm.
Music & desserts
start at 6!
Bring your
Entree Plus
card!
PRESENTED BY THE
UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF
MUSIC JAZZ STUDIES
THE MICHIGAN LEAGUE
UM STUDENT LEADER BOARD
764-0446 FOR MORE INFO.

"All events are worthwhile ...
each event has a focus which should
attract an oppressed group," she
said.
For Sunday, the BMC helped or-
ganize with the Lesbian-Gay Male
Programs Office an event called
"National Coming Out Day and
'Columbus Day': What's the
Connection."
On Thursday, there will be a con-
ference on "Environmental Racism
- the Legacy of Columbus." This
conference will seek to emphasize
the connection between the dumping
of toxic wastes in and near poor
communities in the United States
and in the developing world by in-
dustrial nations.
While study preparation centers
such as Kaplan and The Princeton
Review make great claims, test ad-
ministrators say otherwise.
Dick Green, media consultant for
the Association of American
Medical Colleges, said that people
are currently researching the MCAT
test preparation benefits.
"People who work there told me
that empirical data suggest that study
courses don't improve scores on the
MCAT significantly."
Green said that students who
have registered for the MCAT re-
ceive a copy of the April 1991 exam,
a manual, a video, and practice
items.
Whether a student studies with a
prep center or not, test preparation is
bound to bring stress.
"It was the worst experience I've
ever gone through," said LSA senior
Peter Brown. Brown said that he
took the test twice, and canceled his
first scores. "It made me get stressed
out. I thought, 'This test determines
the rest of my life."'

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MURDER
Continued from page 1
"This is a very small commu-
nity," Strouss said. Most pecple who
could be selected for a jury, he
added, have friends associated with
the U-M Medical Center and may be
biased by information they have re-
ceived about the case from the
media.
The prosecutors' office has re-
leased a list of 27 witnesses - hos-
pital security personnel, U-M
Department of Public Safety offi-
cers, hospital doctors who witnessed
the events immediately following the
shooting, and other hospital person-
nel - who may testify before
Circuit Court Judge Kurtis Wilder
Nov. 2.
More witnesses may be added to

that list, Cooper said, once the
forensic department's examination is
released.
Cooper said these witnesses will
testify to the events that occurred at
the hospital this summer when
Posby walked into Dr. John
Kemink's examining room, and al-
legedly fired three shots.
"(Posby) very much wants to
admit that he did the shooting, and
he wants to explain why," Cooper
said. "We have to independently es-
tablish that he was the shooter, de-
spite his wishes."
Strouss said the defense plans to
call several psychiatric experts to the
stand to testify about Posby's mental
and emotional conditions. Posby
also plans to take the stand.
The trial is expected to last at
least a week.

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
OFFICE OF THE VICE PRESIDENT FOR
STUDENT AFFAIRS
PUBLIC MEETING
THE OFFICE OF STUDENT AFFAIRS WANTS TO KNOW
WHAT YOU THINK ABOUT THE REVISIONS TO THE
STATEMENT OF STUDENT RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES,
DRAFT 12.2
VICE PRESIDENT HARTFORD WILL HOLD
A PUBLIC MEETING
MONDAY
OCTOBER 12, 1992
MLB, LECTURE HALL 2
7:00 PM - 9:00 PM
S- 1 w T 1 A W-& " A 1 T. T 3% 1T9 AT A A T T %

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