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October 07, 1992 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1992-10-07

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Page 2-The Michigan Daily- Wednesday, October 7, 1992

JACOBSON'S
Continued from page 1
that Jacobson's move is due to a
public parking shortage in the
downtown area. Store owners agreed
this problem is a factor when people
consider shopping in the area.
"A lot of women don't like to
park in lots. They used to park out-
side the store but now they drive
around looking for a space,"
Edwards said.
Bergman said the Maynard Street
Parking Garage was "absolutely ig-
nored by the city for the past fifteen
years."
"The city has taken Jacobson's
for granted. They thought it would
always be here. It takes the down-
town for granted."
Bergman acknowledges that the
city has made major improvements
on the Maynard Parking Garage, but
only began to address Jacobson's
needs within the last three or four
months.
He said he also believes that pri-
vate management of the parking
garage will make it "more user
friendly."

Other store owners have com-
plained about the dirtiness of the
downtown area as a factor deterring
people from shopping there.
"I think it definitely needs to be
cleaned up. Especially along the
street and walkways," said Beverly
Haring, general manager of
University Flower Shop.
Store owners agree it is very im-
portant to find a store or several
stores to fill the Jacobson's space.
"The city can't afford to take a
passive role. What happens to the
Jacobson's spot will determine the
future of downtown," Bergman said.
. "The mayor must take a leader-
ship role. What she does about this
defines if she is a good mayor. If she
successfully handles this, she will
deserve a lot of credit," he said.
Most of the store owners agreed
the downtown area has enough
restaurants and would benefit from
more substantial retailing stores.
"We have enough restaurants.
We should add more unusual stores
to add to the ambiance," Rice said.
"We could use a market like Pikes
Place in Seattle. Ann Arbor is ready
for a marketplace to attract many
people."

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CODE
Continued from page 1
tor of university relations, said he
posed a number of questions to
Hartford about unclear wording in
the draft in addition to questioning
the difference between on- and off-
campus activities.
"If we had a major drug ring on
campus - I'm just making some-
thing up," Harrison said. "But we're
running into something that's not
university affiliated. Could we take
action to get them out of the
community?"
Harrison said Hartford's response
was the U-M could take action in a
case of imminent danger to persons
or property.
Hartford also said she hopes to
publicize the new draft as much as
possible and plans to hold another
open hearing Monday to hear student
concerns.
"This process has been particu-
larly thorough and carefully thought-
ful," said Connie Cook, special as-
sistant to President James
Duderstadt. "She has consulted with
so many individuals and so many
groups and most members of the
university community feel as if
they've been included in the process.
"It's a very important policy and
it would be unfair not to have a
complete and careful consultation,"
Cook said.
Those attending the meeting did
not vote to approve the policy, but
Harrison said there was unanimous
support of the new draft.
"We rarely vote, it was just a
consensus but there were no objec-
tions and we gave (Hartford) the
green light to proceed," Harrison
said.
President James Duderstadt,
Cook, Hartford, Vice President for
Research William Kelly, Dean of the
School of Social Work Harold
Johnson, and Provost and Vice
President for Academic Affairs
Gilbert Whitaker attended the
meeting.
Many in attendance said they
thought the current document could
serve as the final policy draft.
"I think it could be the final draft.
I don't think there were any signifi-
cant objections," Harrison said. "But
I'd like to see what the response is
when other students, faculty and
staff read it."
THE.
DAILYD
CLASSIFIEDS

A Georgian soldier holding a machine gun points at a protest rally against Abkhazian separatists yesterday in
Tblisi. Russian President Boris Yeltsin said yesterday that Russian troops were taking control of the railway and
the coast in Georgia's separatist region of Abkhazia.
Russian troops take control Of
Georgian coast and railroads

"

MOSCOW (AP) - President
Boris Yeltsin said yesterday that
Russian troops were taking control
of the railway and the coast in
Georgia's separatist region of
Abkhazia, deepening Moscow's in-
volvement in the troubled area.
Yeltsin told lawmakers that
Russia was not involved in
offensive military actions in
Abkhazia, disputing accusations by
Georgia's Defense Ministry that
Kremlin forces were aiding the
separatists.
Both former Soviet republics

have engaged in an increasirgly
sharp war of words over the o-
week-old conflict, in which Georgia
sent troops to Abkhazia to root out
supporters of ousted Georgian
President Zviad Gamsakhurdia.
Abkhazia claims they were sent to
crush its independence drive.
The move by Yeltsin appeared
aimed at protecting the railway and
Black Sea coast, rather than an at-
tempt to seize territory.
However, Georgia was likely to
regard the move as an infringement

on its territory. All the principal
cities of Abkhazia are along the
coast. Along with their ports, they
represent the richest part of the
western region of Georgia.
"The president (Yeltsin)
believes that he is obliged to protect
and defend the rights of Russian
nationalists wherever they may be,
including Georgia," said Georgian
leader Eduard Shevardnadze said.
"If we are guided by this principle,
then any kind of annexation of
territory may be justified."

0

DRAFT
Continued from page 1
was disappointed with the lack of
student involvement on the issue.
"We are going to continue trying
to work on the administration and
consider other ways to approach it,"
Van Houweling said. "But I'm sort
of deflated that students aren't mad
about this."
"I'm kind of surprised about the
lack of outrage on these student is-
sues," said Rackham Rep. Colin
Leach. "The failure of democracy on
this campus always seems to lead
back to Maureen Hartford and the
office down the hall. We need to do
something about it."
Academic Affairs Chair Leah

McRae said she was concerned with
the small number of students in-
volved in the code's drafting.
"I was wondering if anyone ever
talked to students outside this little
triad of people because I know other
student groups that are interested,
and it seems no one consults them,"
McRae said.
In other business, the assembly
passed a resolution recognizing
Columbus Day as Indigenous
Peoples Day.
Chair of the Peace and Justice
Commission Janelle White said she
was strongly in favor of the change.
"We often function under the as-
sumption we are multicultural. If we
are truly multicultural this resolution
should be accepted," White said.

ASSAULT
Continued from page 1
states: "As justice is the foundation
of the Delta Upsilon fraternity, it re-
spects the rights of each of the indi-
viduals involved in the allegations.
The fraternity assumes no role in
this matter and defers any judgement
to the proper authorities."
Luke Hollis, president of the U-
M chapter of DU, said he heard
about the incidents at the MSU
chapter yesterday for the first time.
"We don't deal with the State
chapter very often," Hollis said.
He added that this incident could
happen at any fraternity, and that
DU should not be singled out.
- State News Reporter Cami
Castellanos contributed to this report.

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HOUSE
Continued from page 1
dent," Harrison said. "I don't think
that it's a terrible bother." Any
problems usually arise from unruly
or intoxicated students, Harrison
added.
The President's House was built
in 1840, and is listed in the National
Register of Historic Places.
The house is the only one of the
five original campus buildings -
four professor's homes and one
dormitory - still standing.
Henry Tappan, U-M's first presi-
dent, moved into the house in 1852.

It has been known as the President's
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It is not mandatory for a presi-
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Several renovations have been
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