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September 18, 1992 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1992-09-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

The Michigan Daily - Friday, September 18, 1992 - Page 3

Dilapidated bridge
re-routes North
Campus bus routes

Ne rote forNothCapubse

by Jennifer Tianen
Students taking U-M buses to
North Campus classes and residence
halls have a little extra time to read
the morning paper these days.
Since Fuller Bridge was deemed
* unsafe by the City of Ann Arbor in
late August, the Bursley-Baits, North
Commuter, Northwood, and North-
wood 5 Circulator Buses have been
re-routed to a new Plymouth Road
course which has resulted in longer
bus rides and different bus stops.
Nancy Gibson, traffic engineer
for the City of Ann Arbor, said,
"The bridge is unsafe for buses and
trucks. Also, we were informed that
we had to reduce the speed limit,
which has been done."
Gibson said the bridge is old and
suffers from structural deterioration,
which poses a danger for heavy ve-
hicles. Anything weighing more than
five tons (10,000 pounds) is not al-
lowed to cross the bridge. However,
the bridge is safe for regular cars,
trucks and vans.

Unfortunately, the buses will be
detoured indefinitely until the bridge
is repaired.
"The city is actively seeking
'Right now it's kind of
confusing and the
buses don't come
when they're supposed
to.'
- Deminique White
funds from the State of Michigan
and the federal government for the
repairs needed," Gibson said.
The inconvenience of the bus de-
tour has frustrated many students
who live on North Campus. Bus
trips tend to take even longer when
they coincide with rush hour traffic
on Plymouth Road.
LSA first-year student and

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C - -Northwood5
Circulator
2;....11.1111111.Northwood
++++/.Commuter
"Bursley-Baits

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Researcher drops
radioactive P-32 in
Med Sci building

:-

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Bonistee'

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............................N
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Due to the Fuller Bridge failure,
Bursley-Baites, North Commuter,
Northwood and Northwood 5
Circulator buses will be following
detour routes until the bridge has
been repaired. The time
schedules found in the existing
bus map will remain in effect for
the duration.

by David Rheingold
Daily News Editor
Just as U-M workers were near-
ing completion of a low-level ra-
dioactive cleanup in the Medical
Science Research Building I, another
spill involving the same material oc-
curred yesterday morning in a
nearby building.
A researcher was finishing an ex-
periment in the Medical Science
Building I at 3 a.m. Thursday when
he inadvertently dropped several cell
plates containing a small amount of
phosphorous-32, the U-M reported.
The researcher stopped work
immediately and cleaned up the ma-

terial, then called the U-M Radiation
Safety Service.
Because a few drops of liquid
had splashed into a foyer outside the
lab, the U-M Department of Public.
Safety posted a guard to prevent
people from walking through the.,
area until it was cleaned.
P-32 is a radioactive substance
classified as a beta-emitter, meaning
it cannot penetrate clothing, shoes or
skin.
In a separate accident in the
Medical Science Research Building I
last weekend, P-32 was spilled in a
lab and then unknowingly tracked
throughout the seventh floor.

I

Bursley resident Deminique White
said, "It's terrible. Right now it's
kind of confusing and the buses
don't come when they're supposed
to."
Engineering sophomore Luke
Ivaldi agreed with White.
"I liked it better before," he said.
"It takes too long, it's too crowded
in the morning and it's not good."

"It sucks and I hate it," said LSA
first-year student and Bursley resi-
dent Denise Kramarczyk.
Bus drivers are just as frustrated
as students. They have to put up
with complaints and rude comments
for a situation beyond their control.
One driver said, "If you have a
complaint, call 764-3427. It's not
my fault."

r

Write for the
0g
Michigan Daily
Call 764-0552 for more info

Mandate report shows
increase in minority
students on campus

I

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M-

T-SHIRT PRINTERY
. A's MULTI-COLOR PRINTING CHAMPS!
" STAFF ARTIST SUPPORT.
o 2-DAY RUSH SERVICE AVAILABLE.
" U-M P.O. #'s ACCEPTED.
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w by Jennifer Silverberg
Daily Administration Reporter
A four-year progress and sum-
mary report of the Michigan
Mandate, distributed at yesterday's
U-M Board of Regents meeting, has
accomplished some of its stated
goals, but faculty members and ad-
ministrators say there is still room
for improvement.
"I think we're making progress
but we still have a long way to go,"
said Charles Moody, vice provost for
minority affairs. "We still have to
make the (campus) environment
conducive for all students, including
students of color, so they can reach
their full potential."
The Michigan -Mandate, first in-
troduced in 1988, is a program de-
signed to promote racial and ethnic
diversity among U-M students, fac-
ulty and staff.
According to the progress report,
many university areas have been af-
fected by the Michigan Mandate.
Fall 1991 statistics show that
currently, 20.1 percent of the total
enrollment of U-M consists of
African American, Hispanic/Latino,
Native American and Asian
American undergraduate and gradu-
ate students. This marks a 53 percent
increase in the number of students of
color attending U-M in the past four
years.
African American enrollments
have increased 45 percent during the
past four years to 2,510 students,
who now represent 7.6 percent of the
student body.
Hispanic/Latino students have
a increased 83 percent to 1,240 or 3.8

percent of the student body and
Native American enrollment has in-
creased 47 percent to 189 or .6 per-
cent of the student body.
"I think the numbers speak for
themselves, but the increase in num-
bers is just a part of it," said John
Matlock, director of the Office of
Minority Affairs. "We also have to
be doing things to make sure we
have a climate where people of color
are happy."
Of the total number of minority
students, statistics from the fall of
1991 indicate that 25 percent of the
1991 first-year class were students
of color. Of these, 31.1 percent are
African American, 18.9 percent are
Hispanic/Latino, 3.2 percent are
Native American and 46.9 percent
are Asian American students.
At the graduate and professional
level, the fall of 1991 marked a 66
percent increase in graduate students
of color since 1987 and a 43 percent
increase in professional students of
color. In addition, 159 new faculty
of color, including 79 African
Americans, have joined the ranks of
U-M since 1988.
Matlock said the next phase of
the mandate should concentrate on
creating a comfortable, campus at-
mosphere for students and faculty.
"I honestly believe we still have a
ways to go because everybody does-
n't see it (U-M) as a totally friendly
environment," Matlock said.
Professor of Science Education
Carl Berger agreed. "I think we've
done a pretty good job but I think
like everything else, as you reach
certain goals you find many more."

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Sky high
Albert Wu, a member of Pi Kappa Phi Fraternity, does his time on the
"Scaffold Sit for PUSH." PUSH, People Understanding the Severely
Handicapped, is a national organization.

We are seeking highly motivated college students to work with
high school students in the Martin Luther King, Jr./Csar
Chavez/Rosa Parks-College Club Program. Student Leaders area
needed to facilitate bi-weekly presentations at high schools in:
the Detroit Metropolitan area. These presentations focus on
issues pertaining to college including, SAT/ACT preparation,
financial aid, choosing a college, and much more. Complete
training and materials are provided.
Applicants must have the following qualifications:
* Ability and desire to work with a diverse group of students
.Valid driver's license
*Available to work at least 8 weekday hours
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(No December Grad uates)
Applications and complete job descriptions are available at:
The Office of Minority Affairs
1042 Fleming Admin. Bldg.
936-1055
Application Deadline is Monday, September 21,1992
A non-discriminatory, affirmative action employer.

Balkan war intensifies as peace talks open

SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herzegovina (AP) - Fierce
fighting erupted in the western part of the capital
yesterday in what the U.N. commander said was an
apparent attempt to stake claims before the opening of
peace talks in Geneva today.
Bosnia's increasingly isolated government rejected a
Serb proposal to use the talks to start dividing the
republic into ethnic regions.
Forces of the Muslim-led government poured into
Stup and Azici after Serb rebels launched a fierce attack
on the western neighborhoods. The government forces
had been pushed back into that area in recent fighting.
Gen. Hussein Aly Abdel Razek, the Egyptian

commander of U.N. forces in Bosnia, said the battles
appeared to be an attempt to lay territorial claims.
"They are going to the Geneva talks, and they are
going with some cards in their pockets," he said.
Although the fighting was escalating, he said it was
a "war of attrition" and that neither side had much
chance of winning.
The Bosnian government said yesterday that
casualties in the previous 24 hours had been 31 dead
and 198 wounded in the republic.
The peace talks, brokered by the United Nations and
the European Community, are scheduled to resume
today.

Are you ENTHUSIASTIC
ABOUT THE U OF M?
Apply to be a paid
Campus Day Student Leader
Help prospective students learn
about the University.
Applications due Oct. 2. Avail.
now at Office of Admissions -
1220 S.A.B. Aff. Action Employer

i

A Career
in the

Foreign Service

Friday
a Alpha Delta Phi, "Run for the
Roses Pep Rally," 6:30 p.m. 556
S. State St.
U Newman Catholic Student As-
sociation, rosary, 7:30 p.m. 331
Thompson St.
Q Safewalk Nighttime Safety
Walking Service, Undergraduate
Library lobby.8-11:30 p.m.

Wife"auditions, Michigan Union,
Anderson Room, 7 p.m.-12 a.m.
Saturday
Q Safewalk Nighttime Safety
Walking Service, Undergraduate
Library lobby, 8-11:30 p.m.
Q UAC/Musket, "The Baker's
Wife" auditions, Michigan Union,

Sunday
U Alpha Phi Omega Service Fra-
ternity, chapter meeting, Michi-
gan Union, Kuenzel Room, 7p.m.
Q Safewalk Nighttime Safety
Walking Service, Undergraduate
Library lobby, 8-11:30 p.m.
U Student Alumni Council, mass
meeting, Alumni Center, 4 p.m.
Q UA C/Musket, "The Baker's

Learn about the Foreign Service Examination and the challenge of representing
the U.S. abroad. Also, information on Civil Service careers.

Date:

Thursday, September 24

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