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April 20, 1992 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1992-04-20

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Page 2--The Michigan Daily- Monday, April 20, 1992

VOLUNTEERS

Continued from page 1
Issari said she has never received
any complaints of alienation from
male volunteers, who she said are an
integral part of the organization.
"We have never had a problem,"
Issari said. "Part of our philosophy
is that men need to work with
women."
However, Issari said there are no
male crisis phone line volunteers in
case female volunteers request to
work only with other women.
Rackham graduate student Tim

Darr said, as a male, he is definitely
in the minority when he attends
"Students for Life" events.
"Life is one of the most
fundamental rights we have, so that
was my basis for getting involved,"
Darr said.
Darr said he does not consider
the abortion issue to be a "gender
thing." He said the term "women's
issues" implies that men's opinions
are not respected and that men have
no business getting involved. "I deal
with that by putting the cause before
my own aspirations," he said. "If
women really have a problem with

it, I take a low profile."
Through his work in Students for
Life, Darr said he has been exposed
to many new ideas. "It has allowed
me to work with more women on
projects," Darr said. "And being in a
mostly female organization has,
helped me realize what it can feel
like to be a minority."
In addition, Darr said his view of
women in the pro-life movement has
changed. "I've noticed that a lot of
women on this campus don't fit that
conservative-Republican stereotype,
which was really surprising."

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TEACHERS
Continued from page 1
"I need to keep current on legal de-
velopment for my administration
job, and the material I teach is all
material I need to do this."
She added her position allows her
to bring real life issues into the
classroom which makes the material
more interesting.
With so many responsibilities,
one might wonder how these
professors have any time for
students outside of the classroom.
Tait Sye, a student of Harrison
said he thinks Harrison does a good
job of balancing both careers. He
added that class is interesting
because Harrison brings up issues
that relate to students and
administration.
"He was interested in getting our
input on matters such as the recent
tear gas incident and deputization
hearings," he said.
"He's sometimes hard to get
direct access to, but he always sticks
around after class and is always
available on MTS," Sye said.
Cook said she works extra hours
to be more accessible. "My
philosophy is that people in
administration should be accessible
to the community they serve," she
said.

Gulf war vets. blame
illnesses on chemical
and radiation exposure

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) - Staff
Sgt. Steve Robertson returned from
the Persian Gulf War complaining of
aching joints and a stubborn cough.
He ended up in the office of a psy-
chiatrist, who prescribed an anti-de-
pressant.
"They informed me my problem
was anger and I needed to vent it,"
said Robertson,a member of the
National Guard from Fredricksburg,
Va., who served with the Military
Police in the Gulf.
Twice last year, Robertson took
his anger and those of other veterans
to hearings of the Senate Veterans
Affairs Committee and told about
illnesses they blame on wartime ex-
posure to petrochemicals and mi-
crowave radiation.
Their afflictions include chronic
fatigue, thickened saliva, rashes,
aching gums and hair loss.
Army Surgeon General
spokesperson Virginia Stephanakis
said few veterans have reported such
ailments. And Robertson, now an
American Legion lobbyist in
Washington, would not venture an
estimate on how many have been af-
flicted,
The military recently tested and
examined 100 Army reservists based
at Indianapolis' Fort Benjamin
Harrison after they complained of
illness.
The American Legion in Chicago
said it has received about 60 in-
quiries. Reports of the mysterious
ailments prompted about 10 calls to
The Associated Press from members
of the armed forces from Maine to
California seeking more information.

Robertson expects the numbers to
multiply after American Legion
Magazine publishes its May issue,
which discusses the topic.
"We're afraid this is Agent
Orange revisited," Robertson said,
referring to the problems Vietnam
War veterans suffered years after
exposure to the defoliant.
However, Col. Norman Teer,
head surgeon for the Indianapolis-
based 123rd Army Reserve
Command, said "it's only natural for
some to conclude that these ailments
are connected to service in the
Persian Gulf area, but there is no
proven connection at this time."
Teer and a team of doctors from
Walter Reed Army Institute of
Research in Washington conducted
tests on the Indiana reservists.
Results won't be known for weeks.
But Stephanakis said that, so far,
"there doesn't seem to be evidence
of one particular cause" linking the
complaints to the war.
Also under review is the re-
servists' contact with hydrocarbons
from oil-well fire fumes, refueling
activities, diesel heaters and other
petroleum sources.
Army Reserve Capt. Richard
Haines of New Albany, a former
fuel division officer investigating the
illnesses, said he did find "evidence
of heavy hydrocarbon contamina-
tion."
Microwaves from radar or mi-
crowave ovens also are suspect, ill
veterans say. Teer said studies show
exposure to microwave radiation
does no harm to humans.

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ARTICLE
Continued from page 1
portrayed in the article. The article
reported she received a $3,000 mi-
nority scholarship.
Meredith said she received a
scholarship, but it was not for
$3,000, nor was it a minority one. "It
was a Michigan Achievement
Award for academic standing,"
Meredith said. She was the only per-
son who said there were factual er-
rors in the material about her.
Meredith also charged that
Marilyn Yaquinto, an intern and
freelance writer at The Los Angeles
Times' Washington, D.C., bureau,
did not identify herself as a reporter
when she conducted the interview.
Yaquinto is an alum of the
University's graduate journalism
program.
Yaquinto later sold her notes and
an unfinished portion of the story to
The Detroit News.
Paige St. John, a Detroit News
reporter who worked on the article
using Yaquinto's notes, said that
Meredith's statement that her schol-
arship was a $3,000 minority schol-
arship was contained in Yaquinto's
notes. She added that the notes were

written or tape recorded.
Yaquinto also denies she failed to
identify herself.
Yaquinto said that although she
began working on the story while
still a student at the University, since
she sold the story to The Detroit
News she has no more control over
it. "I don't want to comment on it,"
she said. "I don't want to get into it."
University President James
Duderstadt said, "The Detroit News
has not been one of the constructive
voices for affirmative action on
campus."
Duderstadt said the problem of
identifying Native American appli-
cants is faced by colleges and uni-
versities across the nation. "I think
nationwide there is a discussion of
how you identify ethnic origin."
"If it were in the Free Press I
would have been less cynical,"
Duderstadt said.
Assistant Professor of
Communication Joseph Campbell
said it is not unusual for people to
get upset over the way they are
quoted in a newspaper story.
"Newspaper reporting is story-
telling," Campbell said. "It's not
neutral. This isn't science."

0
0

ENGLISH
Continued from Page 1
top professional schools - includ-
ing law, medicine, and engineering
- for three years, and also ranks
undergraduate programs in a fall
issue.
Although Harrison said he shared

in Weisbuch's disappointment with
the University English department's
ranking, he said he was happy with
the University's showing overall.
"In our professional schools we
do pretty well ... I'm a little miffed
that we're only 14th for English, but
we're one of few schools that is
ranked in everything."

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