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April 09, 1992 - Image 12

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The Michigan Daily, 1992-04-09

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Page 2-The Michigan Daily-Weekend etc. - April 9,1992

Jonathan
Chait
A little knowledge is a
dangerous thing
Note from the author: This is my second to last column ofthe year, which means
that I have only two columns left to accomplish my original goal of offending
every major group on campus. I hope to get this taken care during this column,
and then maybe I can take next week off However, if you belong to a campus
organization which has not been offended over the course of the year, please
contact the Michigan Daily and we'll try to work you into next week's column.
B efore I begin writing about Hash Bash, I want to make it clear that I am
j definitely pro-legalization. I have long accepted, without question, the
more common pro-marijuana arguments, such as:
UMarijuana can provide the cure to all major diseases.
0 Hemp can be used to make cheaper clothing, fuel, schools, and homes.
George Washington, Abraham Lincoln, and Jesus all smoked pot.
So from an ideological perspective, I am in complete agreement with the
National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws, or NORML. My
only problem with them is their acronym. It's a misnomer. Running around in
masks and triangle hats carrying 12 foot-long paper mache joints is generally
not considered to be "normal." Not that this is bad. Ij ust think they should have
a different name.
And while we're at it, we should also urge a name change for SALSA, the
Latin-American student group. I think they would have a lot more members if
they didn't have such an insulting acronym. I, for one, would be reluctant to
join a group called "BAGEL."
Although I didn't attend the Hash Bash festivities this year, a member of
NORML (I'll call him "Fred") took the initiative by marching into a Daily
editorial board meeting and demanding, under the Freedom of Information
Act, to see the files that we had compiled on him.
We tried to explain that we ire a newspaper, not the CIA, and we don't keep
files on people, and that the Freedom of Information Act does not apply to a
private organization, and in any case, we would have to consult with our
superiors in Washington anyway. (You can have a lot of fun with the paranoid.)
Nevertheless, Fred insisted on seeing his files, apparently interpreting the
Freedom of Information Act to mean that anybody can get any information
they want from anyone, at any time. (Hey you! What's the capital of Burma?
Who was Millard Fillmore's vice-president? I demand to know! It's my right!)
My first reaction to this person was that perhaps he was living up to his
group's ideals just a little too much. But on second thought, maybe he's on to
something. Think about it. If you're having trouble with an exam, you could
just present a FOIA request to your professor demanding that he provide you
with the correct answers.
Or, for instance, you could submit a FOIA request to the president of the
College Republicans, demanding that he relinquish a report detailing all the
times and places that he has publicly picked his nose.
The only problem that I could foresee would be if the Native American Law
Student Association started using this technique. Knowing them, they would
probably begin sending FOIA requests to random students requesting the
details of our sexual histories.
So maybe we should stick with the conventional interpretation of the
Freedom of Information Act, although we would miss the opportunity to get
some answers from some of the more suspicious characters on this campus,
particularly those Nazi child molesters in the U-M Bridge Club.

I. -

\YUi WAN~T ANMf

headhoulerslneeandoe

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Madras or blue serge suit?
If you haven't had one yet, you're going to have one soon, and you
need to be decked out in the proper threads in order to make the right
impression. We're talking, of course, about interviews for summer jobs
and beyond. Whether you're opting for an outdoorsy position or an of-
fice job, it all boils down to image. How you dress for that crucial con-
versation can instantly tell your future employer whether to hand you a
contract or whether to hand you your hat (figuratively, of course; avoid
potential hat-head situations when being interviewed).
That you want to work outdoors shouldn't be reflected in your inter-
view clothes. Try to look as pressed as possible, without conveying a
sense of Buttoned-down person. Wearing a skirt or a nice pair of pants,
with a casual dress look about you (maybe throw on a blazer, navy, for
instant panache) will show that you can be ready-for-anything without
fear of breaking a Press-on.
Don't bypass the old standard blue suit for a more staid job; however,
blue does not necessarily mean boring. Make sure that your skirt is
hemmed at, or a bit above, the knee. And add some color to your per-
sonality - a white shirt beneath the suit is classic, but add pattern by in-
serting a paisley pocket square or tie. Keep jewelry simple.
Above all, a smile is the best thing you can wear. Don't leave it at
home.

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PbOR JEFFRE~y JUST STARTED) His
30 AT A B3OOK STORE. CAN you,
HEL~iP H VA SORT THE CH 1LDERF'N
BOO0KS FROM TH4E. "A1'ULT' kS?

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If you're graduating this term, you're probably familiar with the
phrase, "Mayday, Mayday. Bail Out!" If you're not about to be
thrust into the climate-controlled, fluorescent-lit region known as
"the real world," then spring can be a very carefree time for you.
Let's consider some traditional Mayday rituals: Dancing
around a be-ribboned Maypole with flowers in your hair; Dining
on rose petal candy, fruit sorbets, fried chicken and potato salad;
Rolling a hoop through the sunny, safe city streets.
OK, some of you don't live in Tess of the D'urbervilles time,
so feel free to: Rollerblade!; Dunk your toes in a fountain; Stage
a water pistol war; Wash your car ... naked; Play Tracy Chapman
tunes on your guitar in the diag; Go to a baseball game; Stage a
reggae festival; sip spiked mango juice; canoe down the Huron.
(ad
Weekend etc. editor Arts editors Weekend news editor
Julie Komorn Elizabeth Lenhard Lar Barager
MichaelJohn Wilson
Graphics Art Production
Michael John Wilson Jonathan Higgins Kristen McMurphy
Contributors Alissa Strauss
Mark Binelli, Alexandra Beller, Andy Cahn, Jon Chait Diane Frieden, Forrest Green
Ill, Alan Hogg, Roger Hsia, Heaather Lowman, Dan Px, Annette Petruso, Valerie
Shuman, Scott Sterling, Molly Stevens, Ken Sugiura, David Wartowski, Josh Worth

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Drinking

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" Dining
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Hours: M-Th,11:30-10; F, 11:30-11
Sat., Noon-11 pm; Sun., Noon-10 pm
Happy Hour: 4-7, M-Th
2161 W. Stadium (East of Liberty)
Ann Arbor " 769-5722
THANO'S
LAMPLIGHTER
.421 East Liberty
(1 block west of State)
665-7003
Sicilian Pizza our Specialty
Beer, Wine, and Liquor
Open 7 Days til 2:00 A.M.

1100 E. Catherine at Glen - 761-8996
Open 6 a.m. - 4 p.m. weekdays
6 a.m. - 3 p.m. Sat., 7 a.m. - 2 p.m. Sun.
Serving breakfast and linch all day.
Featuring homemade raisin bread
Favorites for over 30 years.
Chinese Restaurant
Mandarin, Szechuan, and Hunan
Specialties. Exotic Drinks, Full
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Special, Sunday Brunch.
Open 7 days a week.
3535 Plymouth Rd.-665-3591
4905 Washtenaw Ave.-434-7978
Students Welcome

GARDEN
Szechuan, Hunan,
and Peking cuisine
Delivery, take-out, dine-in,
cocktails, and Sunday buffet
Hrs: Mon.-Thur.,11:30am - 10 pm
Fri., 11:30 am -11 pm
Sat.,' noon -11 pm
Sun., noon -10pm
3035 Washtenaw Ave., *"971-0970
Italian Restaurant
Homemade Pastas & Pizza
665-0444* Take Out
300 Detroit St. at Catherine
(across from Farmer's Market)

Custom Sandwiches, Subs
& Pitas, Mediterranean Cuisine,
Falafel, Chicken Sandwiches,
Fresh Salads, Plus Much More!
Dine-In, Carry-Out, or Catering
715 N. UNIVERSITY - 663-0069

" ~ ~~WINNING t USN
CHEF JAN Buffetlunches
is the TOP GOLD MEDAL WINNER M-F :3
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CHEF JANDrS:
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1201 S. University - 668-2445 4I1 S.i995-1845

PARTHENON
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MOUSAKA - PASTITSO.DOLMADES- SPINACH PIE
GREEK SALADS & PASTRIES. COM INAT)0NPLATES
FULL COCKTAIL MENU
226 S. MAIN at ",s-Ia-o
Liberty - Ann Arbor CALL 994-1012

Great Chinese food DELIVERED
fast & fresh!
.625 S. Main N. Campus Plaza
Next to S. Main Market 1753 Plymouth
741-9500 741-1600
FREE DELIVERY
TM owned by The Provender Corporation

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