100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 06, 1992 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1992-04-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page 2-The Michigan Daily- Monday, April 6, 1992

Bosnian snipers assassinate peace
activists over independence debate

BELGRADE, Yugoslavia (AP)
- Snipers fired on peace
demonstrators and Serb militants
assaulted a police academy as
violence surged yesterday in Bosnia-
Hercegovina.
-The attacks came the day before
theeturopean Community was to
cowider recognizing the republic's
in4ependence, the main issue
inspiring the violence.
,The Tanjug news agency also
reported the resignation yesterday of
Bdia's Premier Jure Pelivan, an
etl4nIc Croat.
*41,

At least eight people were killed
and 30 wounded yesterday in the
Bosnian capital, Sarajevo, said
Sabina Cabaravdic, an editor at
Radio Sarajevo.
Leaders of the republic's three
main communities - Croats, Serbs
and Muslims - agreed to call for a
cease-fire. They and the federal
military commander for Bosnia
appeared on television as a
commentator read their appeal.
Shooting was reported in several
parts of Sarajevo, which grew
increasingly isolated. Tanjug said its

airport was closed, and Radio
Sarajevo reported that Muslim forces
blew up the main road to Belgrade
about seven miles from Sarajevo.
Sarajevo TV showed
demonstrators scattering in front of
parliament as snipers opened fire
from the nearby Holiday Inn hotel,
used as a command center by Serb
militants.
But people later regrouped and
continued marching through the city
center. Ten people were wounded,
said Tanjug, based in Belgrade,
Serbia.

A~ O ~)E~N

d1 vin and Hobbes
r4.

by Bill Watterson

TA MAIL? YU KNOW
eA SPEM VIL 'KBING
TEMPTATION, oRPIN
r" ~ADDETRUCTION4 OF MAN?
-""
Y'.

NEEDS tmd HEL.
1 2

I

Y{ou J3T cQp
TIo ANIMAWLS I
T IS5E TIAW'I.

T TM-Y
ANOtT '

HASH BASH
Continued from page 1
fiber, the fuel, the food, everything
is there."
Tom Fluke, a speaker at the
rally, taunted police to arrest him
for selling merchandise. "I'm
talking about truth and oppression
that is going on right now, right on
this campus by the fascist cops.
They're busting people for saying
they can legalize marijuana.
Legalize today, get high tonight!"
Rally speakers focused on free
speech issues in response to the
court case leveled against NORML
by the University. In February,
Associate Vice President for
Academic Affairs Mary Ann Swain
sent a memo to the Student
Organization Development Center
telling it to deny NORML'srequest
for the use of the Diag. However, in
a ruling Wednesday, Judge Donald
Shelton found in favor of
NORML's request to use the
microphone for one hour.
Throughout the rally, DPS offi-
cers were posted around the Diag,
the Graduate Library and Angell
Hall. Officers stationed at Angell
Hall asked people entering the
building for University
identification. DPS Officer David
Dupuis said this precaution was
being taken "to keep this from
being a public meeting place."
University police closed the
booth of Ohio NORML member
Joe Shoo for selling sterilized
marijuana seeds without a permit.
However, Shoo said 'he was only
asking for donations. "What we're
doing is Constitutionally protected.
We are being repressed in violation
of our First Amendment rights,"
Shoo said.
John Holmstrom, also an Ohio
NORML member, said he was in
support of the police surveillance of

01

01

0

.
e =

44 WWI

p - U

.I

*w
e.
a'
«

U

The University of Michigan
CENTER FOR CHINESE STUDIES
presents
The Eleventh Annual

READ THE

DOUG KANT
A University Department of Public Safety officer makes an arrestfor
marijuana possession on the Diag during the Hash Bash Saturday.

::

Y::

ALEXANDER ECKSTEIN MEMORIAL LECTURE

4.
.
a.
4.
4
4.

C L S . ...... .... !.E.......l) ....... .......S

the event. "Police have their rights,
they're people. They can be where
they want to be as long as they
don't try to tread on other people's
rights to free assembly, free speech,
and free expression. If they want to
come here and listen to what we
say, that's great."
Jessica Glasstetter, University of

Toledo senior, came to the Hash
Bash to promote the medical
aspects of hemp. "My sister is sick
(with Multiple Sclerosis) and they
won't let her have nothing and I
think it's wrong."
Ralliers at the Hash Bash voted
to hold next year's event on the first
Saturday in May.

"China and Asia,
Developmental Paths"

I.

I

by

SABURO OKITA

Iranian planes bomb
rebel base; one killed

Ghalrman, Institute for Domestic and International Policy
Fornner Minister of Foreign Affairs, Government of Japan
a
Friday, April 10, 1992
8:00 pm
., p.m.

TILL FALL AT WILLOWTREE

,.
:

Rackham Amphitheater
A reception follows the lecture

Located on Plymouth Road
2 Miles west of U.S. 23
Directly across from
U-M North Campus W]
*Certain conditions apply.
Lease expires 7/31/93.
Presented by
HALL FINANCAL GROUP, INC.

769-1313
Mon. - Fri., 9-5:30
Sat., 12-4 * Sun., Closed
ILLOWTREE
S ...

C
:4

r' ,
4~4
r :

"THE SEVEN DEADLY SINS
IN APPLYING TO LAW SCHOOL
AND HOW TO AVOID THEM"
A Seminar on the Law School Admission Process
and the Successful Student's Approach
Featured Topics Include:
-" How Law Schools Evaluate Applicants
* How to Select Law Schools
" Strategy and Timetable for Admission
+ Free Comparative Guide to Law Schools
Presented by EXCEL Test Preparation

I THE PONDS
AT GEORGETOWN
761-2330

NICOSIA, Cyprus (AP) -
Iranian warplanes bombed an Iranian
rebel base near Baghdad yesterday,
the first air strike by Iran on Iraqi
territory since a 1988 cease-fire
halted their eight-year war.
Iraq claimed its forces shot down
one of eight Iranian fighter-bombers
and captured the two-person crew.
State-run Baghdad radio, monitored
in Cyprus, called the raid an act of
"blatant and unjustified aggression"
and warned Iran of "grave
consequences."
Rebel supporters in Europe re-
sponded by attacking Iranian em-
bassies in at least six countries.
The air raid marked a sharp dete-
rioration in relations between Iran
and Iraq, which have not signed a
peace treaty to formally end their
1980-88 war and have been waging
increasingly strident propaganda
campaigns against each other.
Tehran said the air strike was in
retaliation for a raid by guerrillas of
Mujahedeen Khalq, or People's
Holy Warriors, on two villages in
western Iran on Saturday. It also
blamed the Mujahedeen for recent
attacks on Iranian diplomats in
Baghdad.
But the raid may have been an at-
tempt by Iranian President Hashemi
Rafsanjani to shore up support five
days before parliamentary elections,
in which he is trying to crush oppo-

nents of moves to improve relations
with the West.
The air attack was the most seri-
ous clash since March 1991, when
units of Iran's Revolutionary Guards
crossed the border during Kurdish
and Shiite Muslim rebellions and
clashed with Iraqi troops and their
allies.
Rebel supporters in
Europe responded by
attacking Iranian
embassies in at least
six countries.
Mujahedeen Khalq, the largest
exiled Iranian opposition force, said
one of its fighters was killed and
several others wounded when its
base, 30 miles inside Iraq and 40
miles from Baghdad, was showered
with cluster bombs yesterday morn-
ing. It denied attacking the Iranian
villages.
Ali Reza Jafarazadeh, a
Mujahedeen spokesperson, said,
"The real reason for today's attack
was the tremendous political crisis
facing the Tehran regime inside Iran
over the parliamentary elections."
Iraq said eight U.S.-built F-4
Phantom jets "heavily pounded" the
Iranian base and Iraqi troops shot
down one warplane and captured the
crew.

SPRING MOVE
IN SALE'
Pre-lease now for your spring/summer
move in rate to reserve availablity and
receive a special too!

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 8th 7:30 P.M.
MICHIGAN UNION - ANDERSON ROOMS
ALL STUDENTS WELCOME - NO CHARGE
A

A %LA
AA A AAA = Ad
am.9p " Y; cm Ax
t;,O.o 4 * d -*50
. 1 .4 OW *JV A* - t ;,

a liefi firb nz :aiIg
The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967) is published Monday through Friday during the Fall and Winter terms by
students at the University of Michigan. On-campus subscription rate for fal/winter 91-92 is $30; all other
subscriptions via first class U.S. mail, winter semester only, are $80. Subscriptions must be prepaid.
The Michigan Daily is a member of the Associated Press and the Associated Collegiate Press.
ADDRESS: The Michigan DaIly, 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-1327.
PHONE NUMBERS (All area code 313): News 784-0552; Opinion 747-2814; Arts 763-0379; Sports 747-3336;
Circulation 764-0558; Classified advertising 764-0557; Display advertising 764-0554; Biring 764-0550.
NEWS Henry Goldblatt, Managing Editor
EDITORS: David Rhngok, Bethany Robertson, Stefanie Vines, Kenneth Waner
STAFF: Laura Addedey, Lavi 8aragsr, Hope Caledl, Barry Cohen, Bon Deo, Lauren Dermer, Erin Enhom, Rend. Hudlde. L oretelosse
Andrew Levy, RobinLitwin Nicole Malenfant Sarah MCarhy, Travis MReynolds, Josh M Mder, Sheloy Mordson, Melissa
Peeress, Karen Pier, Mona Qureshi, Karen Sabgir, Chistopher Scherer. Gwen Shaffer, Purvi Shah, Jennifer Slverberg, Alan Sueser,
Karen TalasMd, David Wartowald, Chasitly Wilson.
UIST: David Sh grdson
OPINION Yea Citrn, Geoffrey Earle, Amiava Mazurnd r, Editor.
STAFF: Mal Ader, Jenny All& Renee Bushey, Daren Hubbard, David Lehier, Ad Rotenberg, Dave Rowe, David.Shepardeon, Steve
Sinai, Daniel Stewart.
SPORTS John My, Managing Editor
EDITORS: Jods rhuow Albert Lin, Jeff WNiAsms
STAFF: Meg Belson. Andy DeKorte. Kimberly DeSempelasre, Matthew Dodge, Shawn DuFreene, Joll Durst~ Bret Forrs, Jim Foe.,
Ryan Herrngton, Mie Hil.,Bruns nosencno, Dan Uma. Rod Loewntal, Sharon Lundy. Adam ier. Rich MlvialcyBeradotts
Ramsey,Mike Ranhlo, Tim Rardin, Greg ldiardson, Chad Safran, Todd Sdhoenhaus; Jeff Sheran. Tim Spolar, Andy Sb*, Ken
Sugiura, Benson Taylor.
ARTS Elizabeth Lenhard, Michael John Wilson, Editors
EDITORS: Mar k BineW (Flhn), DianeFdeden (Rone Performing Arts), Alan J. Hogg, Jr. (Books), Akite Komom (Weekend eta)
Annete Poliuso (Music).
STAFF: Cadna Bacon, Greg Bales, Margo Baungart, Skot Bel, Meissa Ros Bemardo. Jon Bilk, Andrew J. Cahn, Jonathan Chat,
Rchard S. Davis, Gabriel Fedberg, Rosanna Freed, Forrest Gren Ill, Jessie Holladay, Aaron Hamburger, Stephen Henderson,
Jonathan Hggins. Nina Hodaei, Roger Hsa, Made Jacobson, Andrea Kachudas, Kristen Knudsen, Rona Kobel, Chdae Leploy. Jenn
McKee, Kisten McMurphy, Amy Mang. John Morgan, Michle Philip, Dan Poux, Austin Rainer, Jeff Rosenberg, Vaerde Shuman,
Chdlne Slovey, Scott Sterling, Muesa Strauses, Cards Walco, Micholo Wager, Sarah Weidman, Josh Worh.
PHOTO Kistoffer Gillette, Kenneth J. Snowler, Editors
STAFF: Anthony M. Croll, Mihele Guy. Doug Kanter. Heather Lowman. Sharon Mushor. Susie Palo, Mlr yStevens Pad Taylor

DISPLAY SALES Shannon Burke, Manaq
ASSISTANT MANAGER: Laural WMIlnmon
STAFF: Gre Antis. Alizah Bahadn, MtichaelBarry, Yasmin Choudhry, Meehan Cleary, Moin Des, Kbn Dufty, Amy Fent, Shedi
Frankel, Jason Gabel Rob Gelidr, Amy Herr, Katy ibbey. KdsnatIn rby, Edc Muir. Mary OConnor, Andrea Rautbork Juft Rogn.

er

z/ r r2' % -' k %k T t ti APP- M

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan