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March 18, 1992 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1992-03-18

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"

Page 2-The Michigan Daily- Wednesday, March 18, 1992

REACTION
Continued from page 1
"I don't trust Bill Clinton. I re-
ally don't. I'm a Democrat, but I
just don't trust him. I wish Brown
could have become President of the
United States, because I think he
could have made a difference."
Mark Yurechko, an LSA first-
year student and a registered
Republican, did not vote yesterday.
'I don't trust Bill
Clinton. I really don't.
I'm a Democrat, but I
just don't trust him.'
- Lisa Miller
LSA junior
If he had voted, he said he would
have voted for the President. But he
was not surprised by Brown's
support.
"I saw Tsongas and Brown
speak, and I wasn't too impressed
by Tsongas," Yurechko said.
"Brown makes a good appeal to his
audience. The way he put the
unions first, I think that probably
won Detroit."
Not all students anticipated
Brown's strong showing, however.
"I didn't think Brown would get
that much support at all," said LSA
senior Bob Fajardo. "Just from
what I've seen, he seems to appeal
to a younger voter - not auto
workers."

PRIMARY
Continued from page 1
taged and underrepresented in a
speech at a Wisconsin union hall.
"There are a lot of good people
in this country who don't have a
voice ... I'm going to represent the
unrepresented, and I'm going to
make real change," he said.
Brown congratulated Clinton for
his victory, but attributed his sur-
prising support to voters dissatis-
fied with Clinton and the Washing-
ton status quo.
Tsongas representatives say his
third-place finish in Michigan,
however, is a point of concern for
his campaign. Though he has
vowed to stay in the race until Ju-

ly's Democratic National Conven-
tion in New York, pundits have
speculated that campaign contribu-
tions on the rise since his New
Hampshire and Maryland victories
will soon dry up.
"I'm going to give people a
chance to do what's right for future
generations," Tsongas said at an
appearance in Connecticut. "We are
experiencing an economic threat,
and George Bush is not the person
who can recognize the threat - and
therefore he cannot get us out."
"The task that lies before us, as
it did a year ago, is to redefine the
Democratic party," he said.
Speaking to reporters before the
rally, Tsongas repeated his pledge.
"My task is to stay in this to the
convention to provide an alterna-

tive," he said.
Buchanan, who before the Super
Tuesday contests said he had hoped
to enjoy a 40 percent tally in
Michigan, was disappointed by a 3-
n to-1 margin of victory for George
Bush in the state.
Buchanan's campaign manager
and sister, Bay Buchanan, com-
mented to the media on the former
commentator's mission in the race.
"He's in the race to recapture
the heart and soul of the Republican
party," she said.
The candidates now will follow
Tsongas to Connecticut, in prepa-
ration for next Tuesday's primaries
there.
- Daily staff reporter Hope
Calati contributed to this story

91

Say ahhh ...
Michael Erickson plays on a jungle gym at Pound House last night.

CENTER
Continued from page 1
money either," Matthews said.
Charles Moody, vice provost for
Minority Affairs and OMA head
said that budget limitations affect all
University groups and departments.
"It's not just the Baker/Mandela
Center. Whether it's a department or
a group requesting funding, we have
limited funding," he said. "I think
the center could be very useful and
could play an important role."
She added that she and the center
:lan to reach out more to invite mi-
nority groups to the center.
Currently, the Baker/Mandela
Center is operating on a $25,000
grant from the Reebok Human
Rights Award for activism, which it
received in 1191, Matthews said.
The student-run center came in
response to 1987 protests by Black
organizations and other student
groups against institutionalized
racism. The coalition's goals were to
educate students about class differ-
ences, racism, sexism, and
homophobia.
"A place like this is necessary
because it serves as a watchdog in a
sense that the needs of the people in
the 1987-88 protests, the Black
Action Movement, are being met,"
she added.
Most members of the board and
volunteers are African American
graduate students, Matthews said.
She added that she encourages other
minorities to become involved with
the center.

MSA
Continued from page 1
force ... the assembly should not
supply them with elections until they
negotiate with us as representatives
of the student body, and as equals,"
Ochoa said.
The resolution expressed discon-
tent with the administration because
'The resolution is not
to kill the elections
indefinitely.'
- Todd Ochoa
LSA representative
they "considered the transition of the
campus police ... as nothing more
than a technical change to its present
policy," Ochoa said, "thus illustrat-
ing that they never had any intention
of rethinking their policy towards
the police."
Several students addressed the
assembly last night expressing their
support for the resolution.
"Student issues are not being ad-
dressed. Before you allow the police
to be deputized, make sure students

are powerful. Hold off elections until
we get a dialogue with the adminis-
tration," said LSA senior Christy
Ochoa.
LSA Rep. Rob Van Houweling
said he felt postponing elections
would make no difference to the
administration.
Van Houweling said the adminis-
tration told him in meetings that the
University does not need an over-
sight board - just a plan for one.
He added many administrators
said the assembly would break the
law if they postponed oversight
board elections.
Other students addressed MSA
citing concerns for African
American students if deputization
occurs.
"My main concerns as an African
American male are that the deputiza-
tion process is going forth with very
little input from students and no in-
put from African Americans at all,"
LSA sophomore Richard Clay said.
In other business, the Central
Student Judiciary voted Hinte could
remain on the assembly despite the
fact he is not enrolled at the
University this term due to extenuat-
ing circumstances.

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I

ARGENTINA
Continued from page 1
of cement from the wreckage.
Menem said the dead include two
police officers and three children,
possibly from a primary school
across the street from the embassy.
Menem, speaking on national TV,
did not give details on the other
deaths.
Earlier, Mayor Carlos Grosso
said the bodies of two people had
been found in a building near the
embassy, and officials at the
Fernandez Hospital said a third
person who was at the embassy had
died of a heart attack.
Israeli radio said Argentine
Foreign Minister Guido di Tella told
his Israeli counterpart that four
people had been killed.
Grosso also said at least 106 were
injured, "but it's believed there are
more."
Menem had speculated the blast
S. AFRICA
Continued from page 1
this morning, with four deaths
reported.
Voting began shortly after dawn,
and long lines formed at many urban
polling stations.
"I voted 'yes.' It's the only thing
to do for the future of this country...
My (Black) workmates don't have
the vote and I must vote for them,"
said construction worker Chris
Bakker.
Another voter, C.P. Katzen, said
reforms should be blocked.

could be the work of "what remains
of Nazism and fundamentalist
groups that have been defeated in
Argentina."
In Washington, Israeli Defense
Minister Moshe Arens called the
bombing a terrorist attack by people
"whose intention is to kill Jews
whether they are in Israel or
abroad."
A plume of thick black smoke
rose several hundred feet as crews
passed stretchers, oxygen tanks and
fire hoses hand-over-hand to
rescuers standing atop the rubble.
The 3 p.m. (1 p.m. EST)
explosion, heard more than three
miles away, also damaged a nearby
Roman Catholic Church.
. An estimated 250,000 Jews live
in this city of 10 million. It also has
a large German population, many of
whom came to this country after
World War II. The city has a small
Arab population.
"We were brought up believing
whites and Blacks should live apart,"
said Katzen. "And that's probably
the way we'll die."
Any attempt to reimpose
apartheid would be resisted by the
Black majority, plunging the country
into political chaos.
"Any suggestion that we should
return to those days (of old-style
apartheid) will be resisted with all
the power at our command," African
National Congress leader Nelson
Mandela said Monday in an appeal
for "yes" votes.

0
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