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March 12, 1992 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1992-03-12

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Page 2-The Michigan Daily- Thursday, March 12,1992

HARASSMENT
Continued from Page 1
Mike Tyson trials as indicators of
why women fear speaking out,.
especially in a public forum like a
court.
"Even with the more positive
note of the Tyson thing, look at
what people said about her. Look at
what she had to go through," she
said. "I think that women are still
very much afraid to report sexual
harassment-or date rape, as in the
case of Tyson."
Kata Issari, interim director of
the Sexual Assault Prevention and
Awareness Center (SAPAC),
emphasized that these cases have
vocalized murmurs of victim-
bashing.
"I think one of the effects of all
of the recent attention of sexual
harassment in the public eye is that
it has brought up so much victim-
blaming," she said.
SAPAC Peer Educator Marc
Israel argued that women will not
increase litigation unless the
atmosphere surrounding sexual
harassment is ameliorated.
He said, "I think generally
they're suing to make it stop - to
make people aware, and if the court
isn't any friendlier to them it won't
have any effect. Even if women can
now sue for money it doesn't mean

that the court will treat them any
better.
"Often what happens when a
woman goes to court for sexual
harassment or sexual assault is that
they get put on trial," Israel added.
"The woman is making the accusa-
tion, but she's the one that gets
prosecuted essentially."
While there is disagreement
whether litigation concerning
sexual harassment will increase,
'It's often one person's
word against the other
and that's hard to
prove.'
- Elsa Cole
'U' general counsel
people agree that the ruling offers
another avenue for victims.
The surprising ruling is seen as a
positive message from the right-
leaning Supreme Court with impli-
cations extending to other fields of
discrimination.
"I read that as an endorsement of
the definition of sexual harassment
and the court's interest and support
in efforts to eradicate it," Dawson
said. "What the court says is when
the legislature is silent, then all the
remedies are available, so this has
implications for other areas of
discrimination as well."

Additionally, University
officials speculate that individuals
other than lawyers will modify
behavior.
"It will encourage schools and
universities to treat complaints of
sexual harassment more seriously
and promptly," Dawson said. "In
the long run, that's going to help
the student environment, not if one
student gets money in her pocket."
Orlowski said people who use
sexual harassment to control people
might be swayed by the new ruling
to halt their behavior.
"That kind of sexual harassment
isn't going to stop on its own.
That's the kind of sexual
harassment that is really difficult
to get at," she said. "Perhaps for
those kind of people, that's what
you have to have punitive damages
for. It's a sanction that means
something and for a lot of times the
only sanction that means something
is the bottom-line - the money."
Yet whether complaints of
sexual harassment or discrimination
will ever be litigated or if social
attitudes will be transformed is un-
certain.
"I think the whole controversy
with Anita Hill has made everyone
more aware of what they say and
do," Israel said. "At least they're
acting somewhat better even if their
attitudes haven't changed."

ORDINANCE
Continued from Page 1
benefits because they are a
registered couple.
"We have asked the court to im-
mediately consider reviewing the
motion and grant us a restraining or-
der on the ordinance as well as on
the registered partnership between
the two city employees," Jentzen
said.
Jentzen said it is hard to tell how
long it will take before the Grahams
receive an answer regarding their
appeal.
"If the restraining order is 'not
granted, then we will just go on with
the appeal. It could take a long
time," Jentzen said.
Law School Professor David
Chambers, who represents Miller
and McCown, helped draft the do-
mestic partnership ordinance for the
city. Chambers said he expects that
the Court of Appeals will view the
suit in the same manner Judge
Morris did.
"It seems to me, it is quite proba-
ble the Court of Appeals will uphold
Judge Morris' well thought out rul-
ing," Chambers said.
DEARBORN
Continued from page 1
your income, no matter what your
job is, or you can do two years of
service to your country here at home
with sort of a domestic GI bill."
At the Tsongas rally, more than
500 people showed up to hear his
message of economic and social
reconstruction.
"Think of all who lived and died
before us to give us this great
country," Tsongas said. "And what
did Reagan and Bush do with it?
They squandered it.
Tsongas also stressed the right of
all Americans to participate in
society, including women, minori-
ties, and gays and lesbians.
Former California Gov. Jerry
Brown - who made campaign
stops in the Upper Peninsula and
northern Lower Peninsula yesterday
- told about 200 supporters at the
Marquette County Airport that
Michigan is the area to start deciding
whether American jobs stay in
America.
"I'm the only candidate that said,
'No, we need a policy of economic
strategy to assure a living wage for
every American,"' Brown said.
- Associated Press contributed
to this report

Present at both opening
and closing roll calls
Business
Tony Vernon
Engineering
Brian Kig ht
Andrew M utch
Christopher Teely
Information and Library Studies
Christopher Thiry
Law
Michael Warren
LSA
KenBartlett
Tom Cunningham
Corey Hill,
HeatherJohnston
Amy Kurlansky
Bil Lowry
John McClosky
Sejal Mistry
Todd Ochoa
Steve Stark
Jeff Traurig
Felicia Tripp
Rob Van Houweling
Medicine
Michael Lee
Natural Resources
Nena Shaw
Pharmacy
Susan Wernig
Rackham
Karen Degannes
Roger De Roo
Jeff Hinte
Leilani Nishime
Amy Polk
Maria Yen;

Absent at either opening
or closing roll calls
Architecture
Jason Richardson
Business
Michael Oduro (excused)
Andrew Kanfer
Education
Rob Resio
Engineering
Brent House (excused)
John Vandenberg
Kinesiology
Charles Smith
SSA
David Englander
Scott Gast
Jeff Muir(excused)
Melissa Saari (excused)
Rackham
Alan Wu
Social Work
Jennifer Collins (excused)
Italics denote representatives
who missed both roll calls.

e0

Jennifer Silverberg/DAILY GRAPHIC

Calvin and Hobbes

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IASA
Continued from Page 1
"I hope students on this campus
don't feel this way now because
we've made it a point to work on
those issues," he added.
Guhasakar and Mamdani's sto-
ries are similar.
"It is a problem. A lot of people
have attitudes," Mamdani said. But
the last board and this board have
been working on projects to break
some of the cliques, he said.
He explained that in the fall,
IASA's first dance will be a mixer,
where people will have to meet new
people. "It's going to be tough," he
admits, "but they will have to in-
teract," he said. He stressed in-
volvement in the Divali Show as a
step toward feeling comfortable
with the organization.
"Right now, we're going
through an IASA 'hype,"' Mamdani
said about the current trend of ris-

ing membership in his organization.
"People want to meet people.
That is what makes us," he said.
LSA first-year student Ami
Patel agreed. "It's nice to meet
Indian people because it's nice to
have a few things in common," she
said.
Shalini Chandra, also a first-year
student, said, "It's nice to reflect on
a common background so we don't
forget our culture."
Mamdani said that while IASA
is primarily a social group for
Indian interests, it also is a group
which is interested in other con-
cerns.
"I don't want us to be too iso-
lated from other people. I want us
to interact with the University it-
self," Mamdani said.
He said IASA plans to become
more involved in service projects,
and work more closely with other
ethnic campus groups.

TIHE MICHIGAN DAILY
GET THE FACTS
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Richarsonz
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sA

WHAT'S
HAPPENING

(Located in the lower level
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DOWNSTAIRS
HOURS: M, Tu, Th, F 9AM-6PM
Wed & Sat 9AM-1 PM

MARIJUANA
Continued from page 1
In February, Associate Vice
President for Academic Affairs
Mary Ann Swain sent a computer
mail memo to the Student
Organization Development Center in
which she stated the center was not
permitted to allocate the use of the
Diag to NORML for the April date.
"We took a similar case to court
in 1990, and the University was
forced to give us the Diag. Our at-
torney feels that this is on the same
grounds," Brook said.
Although Swain refused to com-
ment on the case, University General
Counsel Elsa Cole said the adminis-
tration is confident the University is
not acting in violation of the law by
refusing the permit.
"The University has authority to
regulate speech if it is in a time,
place or manner that we deem inap-
propriate," she said.
Michael Warren, chair of the
Michigan Student Assembly's
Student Rights Commission (SRC),
said the SRC will speak on the Diag
during the time slot that NORML
was refused to protest the
University's policy in support free-
dom of speech.
"The problem with the time,
place or manner restriction is that the

administration is using it as a shield
to prevent NORML from spreading
its message," he said.
Warren said an appropriate use of
the restriction clause would be to
ban loudspeakers from use on the
Diag in the middle of the night.
Cole said the University is not re-
stricting NORML's freedom of
speech because administrators have
organized a forum on April 1 to dis-
cuss the legalization of drugs.
Brook said, "The forum will fea-
ture four speakers, two against legal-
ization and two for it. It is supposed
to be as an alternative to our rally on
April 4, but they are charging admis-
sion to get into it."
Warren said the forum is com-
pletely different from a Diag rally,
and the admission fee will deter in-
terested students from attending.
"It is not theadministration's
place to tell NORML what is the
most effective place to get their mes-
sage across, and it is not appropriate
for them to require that the anti-drug
side of the issue be represented," he
said.
"The administration has done this
before and NORML sued them be-
fore and they lost before. They
would rather have the students sue
them and lose in court than follow
the law," he added.

RECREATIONAL SPORTS
Intramural Sports Program

J

RELAYS MEET
(Wednesday, March 18, 1992)

Entries close:

Monday, March 16, 1992

11:00 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. IMSB

CALL 763-3562 FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Schoolkid's
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WAMX Mix 107
and
Present

20TH ANNIVERSARY SHOWING

~~Iie ±ftid4itr ai
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A JOKO FILM DIRECTED BY STEVE GESHARDT
JOHN LENNON
AND YOKO ONO
BOB SEGER o STEVIE WONDER
COMMANDER CODY & HIS LOST PLANET AIRMEN
ALLEN GINSBERG 9 BOBBY SEALE
JERRY RUBIN " ED SANDERS " PHIL OCHS
ARCHIE SHEPP & ROSWELL RUDD W/ CJQ

NEWS Henry Goldblatt, Managing Editor
EDITORS: David Rherngold, Bethaeny Robertson, Stefanie Vines, Kenneth Walker
STAFF: Laura Addody, La Barager, Hope Calat, Barry Cohen, Ben De, Lauren Dormer, Erin Einhom, Rendk Hucide, Loreta Leo,
Andrew Levy, Robsn Utwin, Nicole Malenant, Travie McReynolds, Josh Mockler, Melissa Pood.e, Karen Pier, Mona QureeN, Karen
Sabgir, Christopher Scherer, Gwen Shaffer, Purvi Shah, Jennifer Silverberg, Karen Talasori, David Wartowi, Chastity Wilson.
LIST: David Shepardson
OPINION Yael Citro, Geoff Earle, Amitava Mazumdar, Editors
STAFF: Matt Ader, Jenny Ali, Renee Bushey, Daren Hubbard, David Leitner, Ad Rotenberg, Dave Rowe, David Shepardeon, Swov
Smal, Daniel Stewart.
SPORTS John Niyo, Managing Editor
EDITORS: Josh Dubow, Albert Lin, .JeffWiliwna
STAFF: Meg Beson, Andy DeKorte, Kimberly DeSempolaere, Matthew Dodge, Shawn DuFreono, Jeni Durst, Brett Forrest, Jim Foss,
Ryan Herrngton, Mike Hil, Bruce Inosenco, Dan Lnna, Rod Loowenhal, Sharon Lundy, Adam Miller. Rich Mtvany, Bernadette
Ramsey, Mike Rancilio, Tim Rardin, Grog Richardson, Chad Safran, Todd Schoenhaus, Jeff Shoran, Tin Spolar, Andy Stabile. Keni
Sugiura, Benson Taylor.
ARTS Elizabeth Lenhard, Michael John Wilson, Editors
EDITORS: Mak Binell (Fik), Diane Frieden (Rne & Performing Arts), Alan J. Hogg, Jr. (Books), Jule Komom (Weekend eta),
Anne-tt-CPetn--o (Music).
STAFF: Nick Arvin, Grog Base, Margo Baumgart, Skcot Beal, Jon Bilk. Andrew J. Cohn, Jonathan Chait. Jermie Dahlmarn, Richard S.
Davis, Gabriel Feldberg, Rosanno Freed, Forrest Green III, Jessie Halladay. Aaron Hamburger, Stepshen Henderson, Jonathan
Higgins, Nima Hodaei, Roger Hoe, Marie Jacobson, Andrea Kachudas, Kristen Knudson, Chris Leplay, Emily Marriott, Jenny McKee,
Kristen McMurphy, Amy Meng, Joeh Mitnick, John Morgan. Michelle Philip, Dan Pout, Austin Ratner, Jett Rosenberg, Christine
Slovey, Scott Stering, Alissa Strauss, Sarah Weidman, Josh Worth.
PHOTO Kristoffer Gillette, Kenneth J. Smoller, Editors
STAFF: Brian Cantoni, Anthony M. Crolt, Michelle Guy, Doug Kanter, Heather Lowman, Sharon Musher, Suzie Paley, Molly Stevens,
Paul Taylor.

DISPLAY SALES Shannon Burke, Manag

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