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March 11, 1992 - Image 13

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The Michigan Daily, 1992-03-11

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FOR A E ISIG *«FsMTxO, 'CALL t10) 1-1810TDAY
STUDIES ABROAD

ews reatureS/MAK H hU2U. IT NAIONALCLLGULi NLWSPAPE-.H B

Students lash back at tuition hike

-ur

Intemrnational study at one of ou
ENGLAND: Lonc
West Wickham
GERMANY: Heit
and Berlin
FRANCE: Paris a
SPAIN: Madrid
U SWITZERLAND
For more info
()

r8campuses in:
don and
delberg
nd Strasbourg
: Engelberg

0 Earn credit t
0 All classes at
UnGraduate prc
Internationa
International
Li Undergradui
Matnagement
European St
Languages,
Commercial
CiSpanish and
LI Summer, Set

SCHILLER
INTERNATIONAL
UNIVERSITY
oward your degree at any oflour campuses.
re taught in English.
tgrams in International Business,
J Hotel and Tounsm Management,
J Relations and Diplomacy, and more.
late programs in Bustness, Hotel
i, International Relations and Diplomacy,
tudies, Liberal Arts, Psychology,
Computer Systems Management,
Art, and more.
German Language Institutes.
mester, Year and Degree programs.
rnational University
gewater Drive
CIRCLE N0.01

- -N ..... .. ... . . - - - - - *-- . . . - .. ... ..0I
For more information regarding any of U.'s Career andtEducational Directory advertisers, circle the
apor goodtopn rsote n od immediately to U. The National College Newspaper. 1800 Century Park East, Suite
8 20, Los Aogeles, CA 900007,
01 02 03 04
Name
j Addressj
City State Zip
I Alma mater or College (yr) 03/92

International Studies Abroad
EARN ACADEMIC CREDITS
:: Fall, Spring & Summer Programs
Spain * France * Mexico * Italy
Spring Deadline Nov 15
For a complete packet and quick response call:
1-800-580-8826
CIRCLE NO 02
UMEr e E

rmation: Schiller Inte
Dept. NC, 453 Ed
Dunedin, Florida
(813) 736-5082

Choose from over 1,000 courses. CRCLE NO. 03
Study with distinguished faculty.
Live in campus housing for\
as little as $100 per six-
week session.
NTU'9 V
Call 1-800-228-4NYU, ext. 611
New ork versity is an afimativ action/eqa opprtunity insttution.
OVERSEAS STUDY
Scotland " Australia " New Zealand
Semester ryea cC roes. Transfer
Ittexpetnstve., Ptestigtiotts Vniversitie,
Lirited Space, Scholarships.
American Universities International Program
International Office-Aylesvorth, Colorado State University,
Ft. Collins, CO 80523
1303) 491-5917.

S TDY IN CIRCLE N0.04
A u t'r Aia
Sem ster / Year Sumnm ,
Transferable credit * s1 arranged accomm on * Subjects
in all disciplines * eld studies availabl Orientation
Semester Program F sstartat$4800(includingaccommodations)
The Uni rsity of Queensland, Brisbaaq QLD
University f Central QueenslandTR .* eanoQLD
The iversity of New England, Armidale, W4.-'
LaTrobe University ,Me ourne, V l
Contact: and moretf ,
Austratea - Australian /
Universiti for U.S. Center
315 Ayleso t Hall
Colorado Stat niversity
Fort Collins, CO
(303)491-0228 Fa(303)491-5501 .n. ,

Summer in
NICARAGUA
Meet the people ofNicaragua.
Visit farms,fuactories,
nchols,heoth cinics, day cre
centers. Talk tomarke omen,
store ounern, union tleaoers,
goemmentoficits andmany
more.
2 month program with study tour in
NcrgaSts Jn 8 ai
knuowdgufnu is ire qainad
Insttutefrmint Conperatonanet
Developentn (IICO)
Box 103-Y, Wiliamtown, MA
01267 (413) 458-9828.
RICE UNIVERSITY SUMMER PROGRAM
N SPAtNSJune 4-July14, 1RR2. COSBE
$2190. CnurnsinntenmediatenAdvnnced
Ponvrsaio Literaure andLingustcs
ton n NotenSpannot tafte nFencesborder.
Nsfaiisaecolee dcae eplewho ea
snceeinterest in avrcg ericarn studenlictheir
tomen.CCstrncldesna tday tay inMadrtardavstn
tneBugs,tarSebtnan tander tartlasu del Mac
nd Hedooe HrFcorteroni s plsunritto
DetfSpanh, Ric UniversnnPOBox
1892,Hous',Te 72510r call13 285.5451
Money for College, results guaranteed!
D & N Publishers P.O. Box 6852
Wheatton MD 20906

THERAPEUTIC WILDERNESS
CAMP. Year 'round Therapeutic
Wilderness camp in east Texas
needs cunselors to work with
troubled youth. Degree required.
$16,000. Excellent Benefits.
SALESMANSHIP CLUB YOUTH
CAMPS, RB. 1, Bo 305
Hawkins, Texas 75765 (903)
769-2500
RICE UNIVERSITY FALL SEMESTER IN
SANTIAGO, CHILE Aug. 4A-DRc. 17, 19R2
Total Cnst: $6 300. (ncudes round-trlp
transportation from Miami or NY)
ten t tens t tyo Ch an et ias te ri
ane ctleanta enercamsCosti ncltes
flttio,oonebord.-d ayvit etotaenos
Airecsy5snd r tiktoanmes.leits
gratetRiniersty.t orppcaton urt er
e enf tt at n es tto: eartmentFoe Hisi
SUMMER SCHOOL IN HAWAtt. Current
handbook details 6 major colleges.
Requirements, costs, housing,
transportation, more. $7.95. Catamaran,
Box 90720HB, Honolulu, HI96835-0720
NATIONAL CAREER NETWORK
INC. Salaried training programs,
nationwide. 1992 Graduates. P.O.
BOX 106, NY, NY 10044

Camp Greylock for Boys
and camp Romaca f ogrls ti the
Berkshire Montatns of
Massachusetts, seek kird, j1yftl,
to work with children ages 6-16.
Undergrads, grads, coaches
(families welcome). Openings in
hesehall, basketball, fnotball,
volleyball, gof, lacrosse, sailtg,
swimming, tennis,uwaterskiing,
windsuarftrg, pianists. Nnsmokers
Orly. Cell us at 1212 5821042 or
wrtteCamp Greylock, 20 moest
5th St., Sutte 3n7, Sen Ynrk, NY
10019
CAMP SEQUOIA in New
York Catskill Mountains. Staff
operirgs totr5W, waterskttrt,
liteguards, woodworking,
ceramicsIjewelryoketry,
English riding, tennis, volleyball,
soccer, gymnastics and more!
Cortact: SEQUOIA Dept. U,
Ban 1045, Woodstock, NY
12498 914 679-5291
TENNIS, LACROSSE,
WATERSPORTS,
BASEBALL &
GYMNASTICS
POSITIONS-
Excellent Cu-nd,
Residential Northeastern
Children's Camps seek
men / women interested in
coaching / instructing.
Outstanding facilities.
Room, board, travel
expenses provided. Call
914-472-5858. Staff
Search, 221 E. Hartsdale
Ave. Hartsdale, NY 10530
Make A DifferenCe ...
As a Peer Counselor or
Classrnnm Ast. this summer a
SuperCmp, on excitingpersonal
growth and academic programtfor
teens in CA TX IL MA. Interviews
in April in those states. Salaey,
room and board. Provide own
transportation. CallR800-527-5321
CAMP TAKAJO For
Boys, on Long Lake, Naples,
Maine. Picturesquelocatton,
exceptional facilities. Over
100 counselor positions. Write
or call: CAMP TAKAJO, 525
East 72nd St., 25th Fir, New
York 10021 212-988-8801

CAMP COLEMAN IN THE BLUE
RIDGE MOUNTAINS seeks qualified
non and wonmen who enjoy
working with childrnnaged 7-16
Openings in mountain biking,
photography, Judaica, swimming,
tennis, softball, basketball, soccer,
boating, golf, arts & crafts, music.
dance, drivers (must be 21),
kinchen maintenance. secretaties.
Cull 404-671-g97t, on wnite Camp
Coleman, 1580 Spalding Dr.,
Atlanta GA 30350
KEN-MONT & KEN-
WOOD CAMPS
Coaches, Dept. Heads,
Counselors for private
children's resident camp in
SouthernBerkshires. Athletic
and aquatic-oriented program,
excellent facilities. June 26-
August 24. Two hours from
NYC. Suite B, 2 Spencer
Place, Scarsdale, N.Y. 10583
914)725 4333
CAMP COUNSELORS NEEDED
AGES 19 AND UP
Private summnr camp in the elan
Ridge Mtns.2 hours north of Atlanta.
All waterfront, sports, cultural activities
and Judaic programs. Inquire CAMP
BLUE RIDGE. ens 2oo8, Miamt
Beach, FL 331 5 or phone 305-538-
3434. Also available for groups,
Sororities and Fraternities
CAMP COUNSELORS WANTED.
Boston area. Top living conditions
and pay. Call toll free 1-800-243-
4296
Childrens Summer Camp Staff
500000 MOUNTAIN RANCH. 10063
uold Hil1 Rood, Bouldor, CO 00302
Northernp Wisconsin ReoCt
reeds program directnrs,
receptionists. waitresses, cooks,
dishwashers, salary plus rsom and
board. Send S.A.S.E. to: MASON
LAKE RESORT, Fifield, WI. 54524
Counselors Wanted. Brant Lake
Camp, Adirondacks, N.Y. 75 years
Ono Family. All Sports. June 21 -
Aug.22. Salaries $900 - $1200
Write: Prof. Robert S. Gersten
360 Riverside Dr. A t 3C
New York, 5.7.10 25
TENNIS INSTRUCTORS WANTED.
Boston area. Must play college
varsity. Top teaching positions and
lots of play. 1-800-243-4296

News
Notes
Spring Break is back. Before you
ditch your books and head for fun and
sun, take some time to check out this
month's issue. Turn to page 60to get the
lowdown on the upcoming presidential
election. We'll keep you updated on
the issues and candidates, but it's your
responsibility to register to vote.
Holy dead rodents, Batman...
A U. of North Dakota student was
fined $75 for throwing a dead badger
onto the rink during an ice hockey
game hetween UND and the U. rof
Wiscnsin Badgers. Seems it's tradition
at UND hockey games to throw a dead
version of some opposing teams'
mascots on the ice during games.
Duane Czapiewski, UND police chief,
said police search the arena prior to
each game since most of the rodents
are hidden there beforehand.
I can just see them searching people
at the door: "Excuse me son. Is that a
dead badger in your pocket..."
Oh, never mind.
The hottest tickets In town
Three Eastern Kentucky U. students
drove three and a half hours to Indian-
apolis to get in line for courtroom
passes to Mike Tyson's rape trial.
When they got in line at 4:30 a.m.,
there were only three guys in line ahead
of them. One man offered EKU
sophomore Robbie Phillips $150 for
his pass, but Phillips turned him down,
saying he "just wanted to see (Tyson)
real bad."
Phillips and his friends watched the
jury selection and finagled an
autograph from Tyson.
No nude oil Twister on blind dates...
Scott Gold and Sam Ruff, columnists
for Omnibus, the weekly entertainment
section of the U. of North Carolina
Daily Tar Heel, had never been on blind
dates and decided that needed to
change. The pair had readers send in
their names for a drawing in which the
two luckywinners got to go out on dates
with them.
Almost 250 women entered the
contest, but as it turnsout, the winners,
UNC seniors Ellen Kossow and
Shannon Nichols, didn't have to enter
because their roommate, Hillary Cox,
did it for them as ajoke.
Prankster Hillary signed her
roommates up for "The Dark Side"
date - described by the columnists as
including drinking and dancing - and
if the ladies wanted to, bungeejumping
and nude oil Twister. Ellen said they
drank and danced, but "We had our
limits," she said, when it came to the
nude oil Twister.
-Valerie Loner,
Editor on Fellowship, Berry College

By MICHAEL LAWRENCE
The Daily Bruin, U. of California, Los Angeles
A new tuition hike has sparked hunger
strikes, sit-ins, rallies and marches across the
U. of California system this spring. And the
rumbling of student opinion will only get
louder as the tuition increase forces them to
pay more for the second straightyear.
The 550 increase, which will raise annual
in-state tuition to $2,924 and out-of-state
tuition to $10,735, has helped increase the
cost of college by 67 percent since 1990.
About 1,500 UC-Davis students stormed a
campus auditorium shortly after the Board
of Regents voted almost unanimously to
approve the increase. Three days later,
abut 35 students remained in the huilding.
The rallies coame as a last-ditcht effort for
UC students at a time when higher educa-
tion systems across the country are feeling
the effects of an interminable recession.
The State U. of New York system (SUNY),
for one, is facing sharp increases authorized
by Gov. Mario Cuomo. If enacted, the cost of
attending some SUNY schools will have
doubled in the last twoyears.
At six of the nine UC schools, including
UC-Berkeley and UCLA, students held
hunger strikes on campus, hoping to
persuade university officials to roll back fees
for the 1992-93 year.
"Last year when they raised fees by 40
percent, nobody did anything about it. This
year it happened again," said Rosa Sanchez,

Prague: a haven for bohma graduates
By CHRIS ZIEGLER the idea of Prague as the "Paris of the '90s" is debatable among some
Daily Nexos, U.of California, Santa Barbara Americansliving there.
"That's a very romantic version of the whole thing," said Nik6
Prague. The word conjures up images of a medieval city, a Mikes, 28, a Czech-American from Hayward, Calif. The Post's
playwright president who lives in an actual castle, Kafka and Cooper agrees, saying economics, not art, is the real story of Prague.
Kundera, and aVelvet Revolution. Yet Prague does possess a quality which
But to thousands of Americans who have makes Americans living there vague about
flocked to the city in the two years since the when they intend to leave. "It's hard to
Czechs threw off communism, Prague is explain,":aid Howard Sidenberg, who r left lis
home. A n estimate d 10,000 A mericans - P'h.bD. in politica science on brold at UCSB liar
including a host of recent college graduates the lure of the city. "Prague has a certain aura,
and twentysomething bohemians - have a certain magic."
found that what started as a tourist visit has If a nebulous sense of magic initially draws
become an indefinite stay. Americans to Prague, the city's cheapness
Many have been drawn to Prague by reports keeps them there. Many Americans in Prague
of a cultural mecca - a breeding ground of say they can live on $100 a month - although
intellectualism and underground thought r } just barely.
akin to Paris in the 1920s. But others have "I am only wo rking 15 hours a week
come out of financial necessity. (teaching English)," said recent U. ofVirginia
"There's a lot more opportunity here than .., graduate Gretchen Geggis, 22, "and I'm able
in the United States," said Susanna Cooper, a to pay for food and rent."
25-year-old journalist. Cooper left a reporting To support themselves, most Americans
job in Pittsfield, Mass., to freelance in Europe, teach English. Teaching jobs can be found
and is now a reporter for ThePraguePost. through the Czech Ministry of Education,
The stagnant U.S. economy, combined with American-Czech friendship organizations, or
Eastern Europe's low cost of living, has - Czech firms wanting Americans to teach their
encouraged many young Americans to come employees English.
to Prague to pursue dreams and projects - _ Housing is very cheap - as low as0 30 per
which would be virtually impossible to achieve WADE DANIELS, THE DAILY NEXUS, UC, SANTA BARBARA month - but hard to find. But the low rent has
in the United States. For instance, two English- Hangin' out in the Paris of the '90s. its own cost in low quality and no tenant rights.
language newspapers, The Post and Prognosis, UVa. grad Eric Leckbee found this out
were started last year by several U. of California, Santa Barbara, when his landlord kicked him out on New Year's Day, saying simply,
graduates. And two other former UCSB students are establishing an "Eric, Happy New Year. I want my apartment. Be out tomorrow."
English-language literaryjournal called Twisted Spoon Press. Still, something about Prague still woos boatloads of eager college
"You get this sense that there's something to do here," said Mark graduates to its door. And its special sense of je ne sais quoi is even
Baker, 31, the Prague Post's business editor. making some in Paris see red.
Clearly, Prague's history as a center of culture helps foster young "After being in Paris for a week, I was really happy to be back in
Americans' eagerness to dive into the city's thriving art scene. But Prague," Geggis said.

a Berkeley student who participated in the
fast. "Going without food is going to be
difficult, but something must be done.
Students must be heard."
But some university officials, including
UC President David Gardner, defend the
increase, saying itis necessary when the state
is saddled with growing prison, welfare and
secondary education costs. The state
currently faces a $6.6 billion deficit.
But after enduring the dramatic 1990
hike, students have little sympathy.
An estimated 400 students attended a rally
at the state capitol in Sacramento, calling on

state legislators to reject the increase.
"We wanted to make sure the legislature
and the governor knew that students will
remember this," said Andy Gaytan, a Davis
student who joied the Sacramento protest.
"Students are not going to forget this come
election time. We're here because we can't
afford to go to a private school."
Some state legislators are hearing the
message. "We need t o turn around the
priorities of the state of California," said
State Assemblyman Tom Hayden. "Higher
education is at a crossroads, and the destiny
of the students is at stake."

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