100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 17, 1992 - Image 26

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1992-02-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.



00

0

0

1U U. THE NATIONAL COLLEGE NEWSPAPER Life and Art/FEBRUARY 1992

404 Willis: An attitude
behind the address
By TOM LUCAS
The South End, Wayne State U.
Imagine that the Little Rascals went punk.
As all-natural anarchists and activists foscused
ttn pttsitive change, Spanky and ctompany
certainlytwould have ttne htelluva cluhhotuse.

Well, it's not tto hig a stretch of the imagi-
nation. These "Our Gang" alternatives really
exist, and 4(14 Willis is hoth the name and the
address of the place they hang tout.
Ltwated osn the otutskirts of Wayne State U.
in Detroit, 4(14 is rttn hy a collective ttf
ctocerned students and lttcals who felt there
teas a need ftor a possitive place for people to get
ttogether. 4114 quickly defined its role as a_
venue (ts'r local and out-otf-state punk hands
and actoustic sessions, a site for political
discussions, atnd hest ofl all, a relaxed area tos
simply kick hack.

But hesides heing a cool place to hang out,
404 alsto is a renter for positive change. It's a
self-protclaimed "all-ages, dto-it-y'ourself,
volunteer run, inclusive yet anti-authtoritarian
atmosphere for individuals to ctme tto and.
crate."
404 helieves in the motto "think glohally, act
locally," and this philosophy is reflected in
events and activities. Ftor instance, when hands
play, an expansive tahle of literature is set out
to educate and inspire. After expenses are
paid, prtfits from shows are put hack into the
community and other good causes.

BUL)IG A COMUIT..
ONE BLOC
AT ATIME.
On a local level; where it all begins--where it really counts.
In communities all over the United States, VISTA
Volunteers are recruiting and training tutors for literacy
programs and managing programs to help the homeless.
They're organizing efforts to rehabilitate abandoned
' homes and developing educational programs to combat
substance abuse. VISTA Volunteers serve in low-income
areas as catalysts to revitalize their communities.
Why? They know that VISTA Volunteers' one year of service
to the community builds a strong foundation for the future.
o VISTA Volunteers gain management and organizational
experience as well as hands-on leadership opportunities
.o ff not available at entry level jobs. VISTA Volunteers know
a that prospective employers look beyond college degrees
to just this type of practical experience. Employers know
~ that VISTA Volunteers have acquired an understanding
1 of the community, and an established network of contacts.
Need more incentive? VISTA Volunteers may qualify for
tdeferment of most student loans and partial cancellation
of National Direct Student Loans. And VISTA offers a
living allowance which permits volunteers to live at the
level of the people they are serving.
Build a brighter future. Call VISTA today at 1-800-424-8867,
202-606-5256 (TDD), or write VISTA, Room 11106-B,
Washington, D.C. 20525.
Volunteers in Service to America
is part of ACTION, the Federal Domestic Volunteer Agency

ANN HEALEY, THE SOUTH END, WAYNt STATE U.
Simply hanging out is what 404's about.
It's all relative... One of Helen Heen's
"hrothers" happens to he her son.
Confused? Heen serves as house
mother for Delta Upsiton at the U. of
North Dakota, the fraternity where her
son, Brett Wifall, is a memher. The
fraternity and the joh coincided a year
ago, when Wifall was pledging and DU
was looking for a new house moher.
"When our last house mom left we
discussed whether or nort we needed
one," said DU hrother T. Scott Pegues.
"We felt that we did hecause [having]
her around reinforces the fact that this
is a house and a home." But it's ironic
that Heen wound up as house mother.
hecause she originally toppossed her son
joining a frat. "When Brett was pledging
I was really against it hecause I thought
the fratemnity guys would he rich snohs
that were crying to live up so the Animal
House name,' she said. "But I found
that the men were from all different
walks of life and were just great so he
with." And Wifall initially was nervous
about his mother heing the house
mom. "At first it was a little weird going
to parties and seeing my mom, hut she
created me just like the other members
so it was fine," he said. Doug Froelich,
Dakota Student, U. of North Dakota
Leaving no rock unturned... Uprooted
moms and damaged signs were just a
few of the casualties when the U. of
Oklahoma campus was overrun with
gold seekers for five days. KRXO-FM,
an Oklahoma City radio station, hid
$1,000 on the Norman campus, and
gave listeners clues to the location of the
Bidden money during a three-week
period. Then for four days, more than
1,000 searchers - students and
residents alike - converged daily on the
campus. The final tally for the
destnuction was $1,763.52. It included
the cost of about 175 uprooted chrysan-
themum plants, lost water fountain
grills, storm grates and manhole covers,
overturned bricks, hroken light
fixturesand damaged yellow nuclear
plant signs. The search ended Oct. 29,
when a graduate student and former
OU student found the envelope,
containing two $500 Monopoly hills,
inside a hook in the library. Station
managers hadn't planned on the harm
to the campus, saying similar events in
other locations hadn't caused
problems. Officials originally denied
responsibility, but the station later paid
the damages and recanted its earlier
position..m Damon Gardenhire, The
Oklahoma Daily, U. of Oklahoma

JAMIHES1TAYLOR 429 2u9 TANYA TUCKER 420 372 TOUNG MC 427.062 ! a""w F"n he 426.908 VANESA WUT8HER426.510 ]THE KLF 426-am4 (8RW"8YEARWOODC426148 AARON NEVLLE 425-611
NE OO HIE ; t Do 1008.RW881(ON? ] BRAINSORM ®tm aOn 'On.. 0 .....Th ComrtZane O 8*WHITE8ROOM 5®' -- armWYour Hea5t
TEARSMFOR FEARS 4238481OTMIRHRDSNRC422.238 ;ROXETTE 419.556 MORRISSEY 416750 K OL Youi 115TTENTR m-ul5U8ELU7Nmna"~~ 348 318
aeh. F Th asth~ $199 ® IOYRIDE ® KILL UNCLE !KNCKwa or ar .BEST SHOTS a a. SOUL PROVIDER ,Tt2"~""g as
CATHYTUENMIS 423.69 r 422212 LENNY KRAVITZ 418-814 (UAVID LEE ROTH 416-6101'GATEFUL DEAD t410-365 I U8* 40U1.141 t,'tO"382 374 JIMMYNT RUTETT 339-011
MOET HI 3sa.54oHTw w.864 asMAMA SAIDO ®{ A- pe An't E3M.. ®aap e BTU0Atr ®390 3s69 Ha.. - BIIN E 05)GREATESTRHITS a
JONCUA 23-5741 BADENGLISH 422.170 1UDANNE REVES 418-7561 GLORIA ESTEAN 415.943IBMYZIt MEN 422.754 UET PALMER 420-9371 TOM PETT 482.184 THECARS 339.903
as CMP ®BACKLASH as I REMEMBER ow..-{INTOTHEULIGT a C® RGIBCoo KY .Wmp® dito 01.1 ®'maF8uMon F aspSREATEST HITS a
{urulHANra 423-525 DIANA ROS 222-0891 ALICEKIN CHAIMS 414-292; POISON 408-963 - BONNIERAIT 381-087 BMILLY JOL- 1336-396
Electric O86~rd ® Th sAo.BearTI vea (AELIT j FLESH 8 BLOOD { N4t __ ICK OFTIME VOLS.HBB54R I + an ®6339
VAROUS ARISTS 426.825 ALICEUCOUPER 422.063 SN R TEECURE t13.]492 ffBARIAHCRRET 407.510 H.EEWDUAC 375.782 1 1~6CK 326,629
NEW JACK CIY ea. HE STOOPIas om InTeS A.8
® M1EOTKI a ""-- IXED UP ®393-496vGRAETHS ao (
{ BON JW 423.392 i"er'"'""'u F0s322.0556!!AUL 688*09 412-8069 JATADDCTION 407-098 JOURNEY 375-279 AIRSUPLY 321-307
I Stpp"When We !RWRLDUOUTSIDEU E I1,' a1°F D INDo_ L Habitual058 E.. RCETITS ® GREATESTRHTS [
223-33iTASI 42-6R5l .Ofsa.® icsmOPaio® Rp r-CAHRU1USEA 412 528 RAUUHRpAST 406-6940 -' MET -. A 392-03FREOR 318-0551-1REOD
EMB. HO ML WATER " (aw5 . 9.83I[a.
F2-5 RANKCUNATMGA 321-651 ! VUUCLTTART. CCUMIC 41.33nlaaweaoSS
FOREIGNER 423.160E MARC COHNM 4212171OILYPARB80R12.171 406-84 6 UC4 16-933 a aon 371.068 DAN FOGELBERG 317.149
UNUSUALRHEAT ®: ] Sa-5{4age heaSe t R® EARERLVC ACOYoo eI ®+6Y545 Boom" .8... ®0GSEESTFLT
No- a- U.N.'m_
[ 423-147 06;1SID8ROW 422-220 PEARHRBRTSHN 418-723 098'"X" 412.1068 ..5'5405 N93A SEH 71 AHLR 368-371 NEL DIAMOND314.43
M~rer t LeBst8ls ®{Save To The A W ®{]Can YouSo Te .W 541 0.o35. ~( 390.724 88U162 >sRn,,e t& b.CKn
THETFABULOUSUNDR 423-063 iWatESaE8RaK8 421-123 PATRENATAR 418-624 { N IIS 411-876 VLAU8tNRREI406-RH85 ICUAPTNH 400457 RHREWAGUH367 872 MILLIE MELSHM 1311 001 AEH
7HR.UNUERREDIRMS- ;what YoSwart 54OTRULOVE ® a -b" s m T81h a05 The La .52B...09 ___ JOURNEYMABAM aest "hBeRI asREATMMrs0®391.03
WORLDPARTY 421-057E ZZ TOP 418-491 1 WHIT OUSTON 411-710 DAMNTYANUEES 405-8861LUSDA RONSTADT 369-8741 PA8TYCLINE 365-924
05.06YouWNrs ®i RECYCLER 0 i I'MBTow Baby T4.S - aw- ~o Y I= i . ee . GREATESTUCHITS
~ ALANSJACKSON 420-835 JOE WALSH 418-012' RERA MUENTIRE 411-5061 HEART 40-55AINET JACKSON 380.918 PRETERSR 362-541
" KUMWSHMON420-679 ESCAPE CLUB 417-86 WARRANT 411-388 DEPECHEMHUE 405-423 BBOGTCCTCRUE 387-94 HTOYEMETT 362-236
NW. U5J F. ow O UolarsAndASe mn± CERRY PE ®- VOLAORB D RFEELGOOD- ..n SING9SBENLIN -
G E 2-8 LSCSE 2-8 EORGEUSTRAIT 417-834 71e 86H0880l11,.306 MC. HAMMER 403-477 ROLLING50STONES 387-738! RERR MUENTIRE 355-826 FIREHOUSE 41318
NIGL ENNDY42300 'NAV( ~tas.J.420.109 8I R MBU SELON416.9091 JO8HNNY MAHIS 411.223 EDDIERMONET 403-428 ICHR81815.46 386.144 LIBERACE 354.522 {AEROSMITH 306-225
CODDHUE422.253 }THE CRUSADERS 419.952 11GREAT WHIE 416.7841 GO" L KR 411.181 !RASIA:LondAon 401-752 AIR SUPPLY 426-8568 2 354-49 I858286.04008t9.55
- 81 425-421 LA. GUMS 424-697 909NG 4244440 88486U8a18B86 424-416 DAVIRSANBU8S 423-103 JHWILLIMS 422-717 r""" UL5OD411422410 TRACKSTRITT 422-113
HOT NIR 4 4f549ollwood0.mro -a. THE SOUL CAES asPeaceful J8886 as ANOTHER HANDS8 cw ..i LoveA Paae oaaa- eM48U2''Hxa~ na KAbotr ng* . 1
MORE SELECTIONS AND COMPLETE DETAILS ON THE OTHER SIDE.

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan