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January 10, 1992 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1992-01-10

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W

Page 2-The Michigan Daily- Friday, January 10, 1992
Mexico moves to reduce pollution levels

.._.

MEXICO CITY (AP) - Dawns
are clear and crisp in this capital of
15 million but within an hour a
dingy, gray-brown cloak of smog
begins at street level and clings like
a migraine headache over the city.
More than 2.5 million cars, most
of them pumping poor-quality diesel
and gasoline through decrepit en-
gines, make the air among the
world's filthiest.
Periodic anti-pollution measures
have chipped away at the problem,

but the sweeping plan announced
Wednesday by President Carlos Sali-
nas de Gortari has even the most
skeptical environmentalists excited.
Salinas set up a commission of
Cabinet ministers, government offi-
cials, environmentalists and business
leaders to develop a proposal for
converting all public transportation
vehicles - blamed for 30 percent of
the city's air pollution - to natural
gas.
The plan also calls for forming a

reforestation program, importing
more low-lead gasoline, financing
better public transportation and im-
proving methods of monitoring air
quality in the capital.
"We don't want development at
the cost to health and damage to the
environment," said Salinas, who has
struggled to balance Mexico's need
to industrialize with its staggering
environmental problems.
Past efforts included closing a
major refinery at the edge of the city,

taking cars off the streets one day a
week according to license numbers,
and subsidizing the replacement of
older taxis and collective vans.
The government has also tried to
encourage industries to build plants
away from the Mexico City area, but
results have been mixed.
In addition, all cars now made in
Mexico must use unleaded gas. Nat-
ural gas has been substituted at
thermoelectrical plants around the
city and annual pollution inspections
are mandatory.

i

JAPAN
Continued from page 1
a new global partnership."
The president stressed the impor-
tance of a Japanese government
pledge to buy American computers.
M U S K

Bush said American military ties
with Japan will remain strong, and
the Japanese will continue to permit
and financially back deployment of
American forces. He also said post-
Cold War cooperation with Japan is
essential.

cis
Continued from page 1
A.F.K. Organski said it is ironic that
Europe has taken the U.S.S.R.'s place
as a rival to the United States. He
said the most important effect the
crumbling of the Soviet Union has
had on the United States is a de-
crease in military expenditures.

Meyendorff said with or with-
out U.S. aid, if the Commonwealth
is not successfully integrated into
the world economy, it will resem-
ble a Third World economy.
But if it is successful, she added,
it could "eventually become an-
other Europe." However,
Meyendorf stressed that such a pos-
sibility is not likely to happen in
the near future.

i Scantdinavian Studies
You know Ingrid and Ingmar-
NOW explore the rest
SWEDISH FILM BEYOND BERGMAN
Scand. 481-NEW COURSE WINTER 92 only
Visiting Professor Dr. TyttiSoila
of Stockholm University Film Department
Films shown at MICHIGAN THEATRE each week
he JA -f f f .. 2 L
DON'T GET FROSTBITE ON YOUR WAY
TO CLASS THIS WINTER.

Paying last respects
Supporters of Zviad Gamsakhurdia pay their last respects yesterday in
Tbilsi to those killed last week during demonstrations supporting
Gamsakhurdia.

THE HOMELESS

CHILDREN AT RISK
ADULT ILLITERATES

RUSSIA
Continued from page 1
He said Ukraine would allow the
fleet to remain under the control of
the new Commonwealth of Indepen-
dent States as long as the ships carry
nuclear weapons.
All the nuclear weapons arc
scheduled to be removed from the
ships by July, when the armada
must switch allegiance to Ukraine,
Kravchuk said, according to Tass.
Kravchuk also expressed regret
that he agreed last month to the ap-
pointment of former Soviet Defense
Minister Yevgeny Shaposhnikov as
interim commander of the common-
wealth's armed forces, according to
Yuri Lukanov, a spokesman for the

Ukrainian independence movement
Rukh.
"We'll try to fix that," Lukanov
quoted Kravchuk as telling the offi-
cers at the Ukrainian parliament
building.
Despite the political tug-of-war
over the fleet, no physical clashes
have been reported between ethnic
Ukrainian and Russian servicemen,
who serve side-by-side in land and
sea units.
"Russia is trying to build normal
relations with Ukraine," Yeltsin
said, noting that the two nations
have 1,000-year-old ties and that 11
million Russians live on Ukrainian
soil. "Because of this we cannot
quarrel with Ukraine."

THE ELDERLY
For more information
stop by Project Community,
Room 2205, Michigan Union Trained Volunteer Corps
SOP H M-RS.
CoinnSoon
Career Planning & Placement
programs designed especially
for you.
Check your mailbox when
you return in 1992.
The University of Michigan
Career Planning Plac ent
NEXT SUMMER,
Onen your mind

University
Towerx
Furnished
Apartments
JUST MINUTES FROM CENTRAL
CAMPUS BUILDINGS AND THE
NORTH CAMPUS BUS STOP.
Now leasing for Winter, Summer, and Fall terms.

JACKSON
Continued from page 1
the primary to keep him from get-
ting the nomination, Huls said.
Jackson hopes to add 100,000 new
voters with a voter registration
drive in time for the Michigan pres-
idential primary.
New Detroit, Inc. President Paul
Hubbard said he hopes to attract at
least 10,000 people to the Lansing
noon rally opposing the budget cuts.
"We're working with churches,
WILDER
Continued from page 1
campaign through to the Democratic
National Convention and lobbied
for minority concerns.
"Well, it's bad," said Ken Hen-
nings, an Engineering sophomore.
"It would have been good to have an
African American candidate running
for President.
"We've seen (Black) mayors and
governors, pretty soon it would be
nice to see one in the president's
chair," he added.
"It's like a catch-22, because I'm
disappointed that there's no African

labor unions and community groups
in setting up bus loads of people to
converge on the capital on the
15th," Hubbard said.
"Jackson's focus has expanded.
We are trying to rally all groups
and not just minorities, the home-
less, or the unemployed," Huls said.
LSA senior Dana Miller, presi-
dent of College Democrats - one
of the groups sponsoring Jackson's
visit - said she estimates about
4,000 people will come to see Jack-
son's speech.
American candidate, but the ones
that we've had haven't made any real
gains," Williams said.
Williams said she would sup-
port Jackson if he mounted a cam-
paign, and added that she hoped he
could make a "significant impact"
in the race if he joins.
Redmond said that he would like
to see Jackson run, but was not op-
timistic about 'the chances for a
Black candidate.
"I'd love to see Jesse run, but I
don't think it's realistic now. There
are still a lot of barriers," Redmond
said. "I don't think the country is
ready for a Black president."

01

-'e -flkbgrn r aiI
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