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February 07, 1992 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1992-02-07

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The Michigan Daily - Friday, February 7, 1992 - Page 3

Haitians repatriate
,to nation's capital

GEO disputes
undergrad TAs
by Karen Pier
Daily Graduate Schools Reporter _______

PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti
(AP) - The United States resumed
its effort to return more than
10,000 Haitian boat people, deliver-
ing two shiploads of refugees to the
capital's wharf yesterday for a bleak
homecoming.
The repatriation came amid indi-
cations that a U.S.-supported inter-
national push for a negotiated set-
* tlement of Haiti's political crisis
was stalled.
Today marks the anniversary of
the swearing-in of President Jean-
Bertrand Aristide, Haiti's first
democratically elected president,
but he was in office less than eight
months before being ousted in a mil-
itary coup.
Aristide, in a broadcast, said U.S.
plans to loosen a trade embargo im-
posed in retaliation for the coup
would cause his backers to

"radicalize" their positions. There
were signs the sanctions had been
hurting the poor rather than the
powerful at whom they were aimed.
At Port-au-Prince's oily, sun-
drenched pier, small groups of
Haitians gathered to watch 508 of
their compatriots descend from two
U.S. Coast Guard cutters with bun-
dles of clothing and enter a large
concrete-roofed patio for
processing.
"To see them return like this,
truly humiliated, makes me want to
give up my Haitian citizenship,"
said 19-year-old Nipson Isme, a high
school student.
Most of the refugees were ex-
pressionless, but a few smiled
sheepishly for foreign news photog-
raphers. Some expressed concern
about their future treatment by au-
thorities.

Although all teaching assistants (TAs) do not have
the same teaching ability, many people do not know
that they do not have the same educational background
-- some TAs are undergraduates.
Graduate Employee Organization (GEO) members
said they are unhappy about undergraduates teaching
classes and claim their contract with the University
says that only graduate students should be TAs.
GEO filed a grievance with the University, but it
was denied. Now they have an arbitration date in late
April or early May, said GEO President Tom Oko.
Dan Gamble, University manager of compensation
and staff relations, denies that having undergraduates
work as TAs violates the contract with GEO.
He said the contract provides for them under a
clause allowing "temporary employees." He added
that undergraduates have been helping professors for
decades.
Eliot Solloway, an Electrical Engineering and
Computer Science assistant professor, said he has no
qualms about having undergraduates as teaching assis-
tants. The primary characteristic needed, he said, is
responsibility.

Correction
The story on the Michigan Union Board of Representatives (MUBR) in the
Thursday, Feb. 6, Daily should have stated that the fight last Thursday (Jan.
30) at the Union was between non-University students.
What's happening in Ann Arbor today

Getting a leg up
As part of initiation, first-year soccer players row seated around the Diag M yesterday.
SODC to teach leadership

9-

Meetings
Friday
Japan Student Association, general
mtg, Michigan Union, Kuenzel Rm,
8:30 p.m.
Sunday
Alpha Phi Omega, pledge mtg, 6 p.m.;
chapter mtg, 7 p.m., Michigan Union,
Kuenzel Rm.
Inter-Cooperative Council, mass
mtg, find out about fallwinter, spring
or summer availability in coops,
walking tours following the mtg,
Michigan Union, Kuenzel Rm, 2-4
p.m.
Student Education Peer Program,
mass mtg, Michigan Union, Anderson
Rms C & D, 7 p.m.
U of M Asian American Association,
weekly Steering Committee mtg, 4202
Union, 1 p.m.
U of M Chess Club, weekly mtg,
Michigan League, 1 p.m.
VSA, general mtg, Michigan Union,
Anderson Rm D, 1 p.m.
Speakers
Friday
"An American Journalist Looks at
Moscow Today", An informal
discussion led by Peter Slevin. 3rd floor
conference rm, MLB, 2-4 p.m.
"The Genesis of Graphitised
Diamonds in the Beni Bousesa and
Ronda Peridotite Massifs", Gareth
Davis. 1640 Chemistry Bldg, 4 p.m.
"Image Restoration Using Product
Partition Models", John Hartigan.
2408 Mason Hall, 4 p.m.
"New Forms of the American Right
Wing in the U.S. and Abroad", Russ
Bellant, 802 Monroe St., noon.
Saturday
"Science In Ancient India", Subash
Kak. Michigan League, 3rd floor, Rm
D, 2 p.m.
Furthermore
Friday
Safewalk, night-time safety walking
service. Sun-Thurs 8 p.m.-1:30 a.m.,
Fri-Sat, 8 p.m.-11:30 p.m. Stop by 102
UGLi or call 936-1000. Also, extended
hours: Sun-Thurs 1-3 a.m. Stop by
Angell Hall Computing Center or call
763-4246.
Northwalk, North Campus nighttime
team walking service. Sun-Thur 8
p.m.-11:30 p.m. Stop by 2333 Bursley
or call 763-WALK.
ECB Peer Writing Tutors,
Angell/Mason Hall Computing Center,
7-11 p.m.
Registration for "Uncommon
Campus Courses", North Campus
Commons.
Ann Arbor Department of Parks
and Recreation, registration for Over
30 Hockey Leagues, Spring Golf
League, Spring Science Day Camp,
and Spring Pioneer Living Day Camp.
Film Series, Cry Freedom, Chrysler
Center Aud, North Campus, free, 5
p.m.
L.A. Story, free movie, International
Center, Rm 9, 8 p.m.
U of M Bridge Club, weekly duplicate
bridge game, Michigan Union, Tap
km, 7:15 p.m.
U of M Ninjitsu Club, practice, I-M
Bldg, wrestling rm, 6:30-8 p.m.
Michigan Ultima Team, practice,
9:30 p.m.
U-M Taekwondo Club. Friday work-
out. 1200 CCRB, 6-8 p.m. Beginners
welcome.
U-M Shorin-Ryu Karate-Do Club,
practice. CCRB Martial Arts Rm, 6-7

appointment, K-108 West Quad, 9
a.m-4 p.m.
African American Art Exhibit &
Sale, New Hope Baptist Church, 218
Chapin St., 6-9 p.m.
Multicultural Arts Festival, evening
of dance, RC Aud, 7 p.m.
University of Michigan Gospel
Chorale, concert, limited seating,
Honey Creek Church of the Nazarene,
7:30 p.m.
Canterbury House Music Night,
opening with Corey Dolgon, 218 N.
Division St., 8-11 p.m.
Alpha Phi Omega, Blood Drive,
Michigan League, noon-6 p.m.
School of Music, Concert Band, Hill
Aud, 8 p.m.
Women's Minyan, celebrate
traditional women's festival, Hillel,
5:40 p.m.
Grads & Young Professionals
Veggie Shabbat Potluck The Man
Who Replaced Ann Landers, Jeffrey
Zaslow, Lawyers' Club, Law Quad,
7:30 p.m.
"Study Abroad in Britain, Australia,
or New Zealand-- Bulter University
programs", Union lobby, 11 a.m-2
p.m; International Center, Rm 9, 3:30-
5 p.m.
Mr. Thank You, free film, Lorch Hall
Aud, 7 p.m.
Moonlight Serenade, Huron Hills
Cross Country Ski Course, 3465 E.
Huron River Dr., 6-9 p.m.
Winter Evening at Cobblestone
Farm, 2781 Packard Rd., 6-8 p.m.
Mack Pool Luau, 715 Brooks St.,
7:30-9 p.m.
Career Planning and Placement,
The Federal Government Job Search,
CP&P Program Rm, 4:10-5 p.m.
Saturday
Multicultural Arts Festival, panel
discussions, Native American Team
Logos, Rm 126, 1 p.m.; The Black
Greek Association, Rm 124, 2 p.m.
Great Writers Series, D a v i d
Grossman, Irwin Green Auditorium,
Hillel, 7:30 p.m.
African American Art Exhibit &
Sale, New Hope Baptist Church, 218
Chapin St., 9 a.m.-9 p.m.
Valentine Skate, Veterans Ice Arena,
8-10 p.m.
Blizzard Ball Scramble, Leslie Park
Golf Course, 2120 Traver Rd., play
begins at 10 a.m.
Daughters of the Dust, free film,
Lorch Auc, 7 p.m.
Eighth Annual Winter Leadership
Conference: Unity in the
Community, Michigan Union, 9 a.m.-
5 p.m.
Jews of Germany: Echoes of the
Past, Realities of Today, symposium,
Museum/Gallery of the Jewish
Community Center, 6600 West Maple
Rd., West Bloomfield.
Drum Circle, weekly play of hand
percussions, adults only and beginners
welcome, Guild House, 802 Monroe, 8-
10 p.m.
Sunday
ECB Peer Writing Tutors. 219 UGLi,
1-5 p.m.
Multicultural Arts Festival,
Kuumba plays, RC Aud, 2 p.m.
Michigan Ultima Team, practice, 8-
10 p.m.
Adventure Movie Night Sunday, free
films, Rain Forest Rap and Rain
Forest, CCRB, 8:30-10 p.m.
Buhrrr Fest, Buhr Park Ice Rink,
2751 Packard, 2:30-4:30 p.m.
Winter Fun Day, Leslie Science
Center, 1831 Traver Rd., 1-3 p.m.
Frosty 5 K Run, Huron Hills Ski
Center, 3465 E. Huron River Dr.,

by Caroline Shin
The Student Organization Development
Center (SODC) will be helping students de-
velop leadership skills, such as team building
and networking, to help them get involved in
campus groups at their eighth annual
Leadership Conference tomorrow.
Tami Goodstein, the office's staff organi-
zational consultant, said that this year's con-
ference is geared toward reaching a diverse
student body.
"We're stressing the individual's respon-
sibility to community through organizations
in the University community and in the
broader sense, the Ann Arbor community,"
Goodstein said.
The theme for this year's conference,
"Unity in the Community," will draw lead-

ers from across the University. The conference
consists of two seminars which cover topics
including group ethics, team building and
gender issues.
Charlie Schlegal, one of SODC's student
organizers, said in addition to the seminars,
students will participate in small "homebase
groups" which will provide them with a fo-
rum to discuss issues and network amongst
themselves.
The conference will provide a vast amount
of information about leadership, but most of
all, the coordinators expect that students
must decide for themselves how important it
is for them to develop stronger communal
relations, Schlegal said.
The conference will be held in the Union
Ballroom tomorrow from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Solloway said the issue is more complicated than
just running out of qualified graduate students.
Electronic Engineering and Computer Science de-
partment (EECS) Assistant Chair Thomas Senior, said
the department used undergraduate TAs for the first
time last fall in EECS 181 - an introductory class in
computer literacy. He pointed out that undergraduate
TAs do not get equal pay, but they do the work of
graduate TAs.
However, LSA senior David Glick, who was a TA
for Physics 141, said the undergraduates are working as
TAs because of a shortage in graduate students.
"There weren't enough graduate students. They
needed extra TAs and a few undergraduates," Glick
said.
Adrian Balkan, who graduated last semester, was
also a TA for Physics 141 said he determined the stu-
dent's grades. "I lectured ... assigned the questions,
graded the papers," he said.

Students meet to back Clinton

by Laura Adderley
University supporters of Bill
Clinton held their second meeting
last night in the Union.
Jonathon Grossman, organizer of
the University of Michigan Clinton
for President Organization Com-
mittee, ran the meeting in con-
junction with former Michigan
Student Assembly Vice President
Angela Burkes.
He said the meeting was held in
order to "get the organization off
the ground."
Grossman, who is working in

Washtenaw and Oakland counties
and with Michigan colleges, said he
was pleased with the turnout and
feels that he and Burkes were suc-
cessful in conveying to University
students that they can get involved
in the Clinton campaign.
Students who attended last
night's meeting said they were very
enthusiastic about Clinton's candi-
dacy. RC sophomore Braden Mur-
phy said that Clinton is "the only
Democratic candidate with any

executive experience."
Grossman said he feels that
Clinton's staunch support of issues
such as abortion and civil rights has
made him a popular candidate among
students.
"His strongest point is that he's
the first candidate since John
Kennedy that's stood up and said we
need to change the government -
but that we also need to change
something about the people, too,"
Grossman added.

Clinton

i

I

Reli gious]
Services
AVAVAVAVA
CANTERBURY HOUSE
(The Chaplaincy of the Episcopal Church
of the U-M Community)
218 N. Division St. " 665-0606
SUNDAY:
Eucharist-5 p.m. at St. Andrew's Church
(across the street)
Supper-6 p.m. at Canterbury House
WEEKDAYS (except Thursday):
Evening Prayer-5:30 p.m.
WED.: Eucharist--4:10 p.m. at Campus Chapel
The Rev. Dr. Virginia Peacock, Chaplain
EVANGEL TEMPLE
ASSEMBLY OF GOD
2455 Washtenaw (at Stadium)
SUNDAY: Worship-10 a.m.
Van Rides available from campus.
Call 769-4157 for route info.
LUTHERAN CAMPUS MINISTRY
LORD OF LIGHT LUTHERAN CHURCH, ELCA
801 South Forest (at Hill Street), 668-7622
SUiNDAY: Worship-10 a.m
WEDNESDAY: Bible Study-6 p.m.
Evening Prayer-7 p.m.
UNIVERSITY REFORMED CHURCH
1001 East Huron (at Fletcher)
SUNDAY: Worship-10:30 a.m.
Student Luncheon-12 noon (FREE)
For info., call Dan Carlson, 662-3153

BBQ Rbs
Beef Back Ribs, slow
cooked with a spicy
Red Sauce. Meat so
tender, it just falls off
the bone.

..,_
'
.
r"j

4
q1

All You Can Eat m4 $575
served with Fries & Slaw
FRIDAYS
5:00 p.m.-Midnight
Make Ashley's
your spot on State!
338 South State (at William)
Ann Arbor " 996-9191

In 1939, America was poised between an
unforgettable past and an unbelievable future.
The Time of Your Life
--. un

U

Sunflhler
Abjroad
Have the time of your life!
Travel/Study in Denmark, England,
France, Germany, Italy, Nigeria,
Poland, Spain
languages, literature, civilization, music,
folklore, film, art history, theater,
history, political science, economics

-1

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