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February 07, 1992 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1992-02-07

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01

Page 2-The Michigan Daily- Friday, February 7, 1992

HEALTH
Continued from page 1
growth of federal spending.
It would, he said, "create the
kind of market-based reform plan
that will give Americans the kind
WASTE,
Continued from page 1
general in Washington state.
Richard Kraus, a lawyer for a
group of Michigan radioactive
waste generators known as the
Michigan Coalition of Radioactive
Materials Users (MichRad), said
the state is having difficulty
identifying a site for waste disposal.
"Michigan has done three site
reviews, but in each case (it) has run
into wetlands," he said.
Since the three original site
reviews, there have been 78 other
proposed sites, Kraus said, but the
state funding crunch means
development is not possible.
Other Compact states were an-
gered by new, tighter environmental
statutes in Michigan which disqual-
ified all state land from use as a
dump site for low-level radioactive
waste.
Kraus agreed that Michigan's
environmental legislation may pre-
vent the creation of a state dump
site, but that no federal regulations
were violated.
"The statute was definitely
adopted, but we don't believe the
criteria are inappropriate under
federal law," Kraus said.
Kraus said there are 54 compa-
nies in the state that use nuclear
materials and generate low-level

of health care they want and deserve
and put an end to the worry that
keeps them awake at night."+
"The president's plan is
disgraceful," said Joyce Lashof,
president of the American Public
Health Association. She said Bush
was putting a Band-Aid on a system
radioactive waste. Among these pro-
ducers are utility companies, univer-
sities, hospitals, and industrial
plants.
The waste producers have been
storing their own waste in their
own facilities since November 1990,
and some of them are reaching capac-
ity. Kraus said, "It's primarily some
of the smaller generators like
hospitals and industrial producers."
As for what will happen when
their own sites are filled, Kraus
said, "It depends on each individual
case. They could switch to different
types of radioactive materials which
would produce less waste. Some
universities are restricting research
activities."
It is not feasible that Michigan
will have its disposal site com-
pleted by the deadline date of Jan-
uary 1993, Kraus said. Between 1993
and 1996 "the state has the option
to take possession of the waste or
repay surcharges to the generators,"
he said.
After 1996, the state will have
to accept the waste.
Kraus said Michigan plans to ap-
peal the latest decision by the U.S.
Court of Appeals. "I'm submitting
a petition for a rehearing in federal
court (Friday)," he said.

that needs "radical surgery."
House Majority Leader Richard
Gephardt (D-Mo), said Bush's plan
"will put more money in the
pockets of insurance companies and
doctors, but will do nothing to
make health coverage affordable or
ensure Americans have access to

quality care."
Sen. Bob Packwood (R-Ore), said
the Bush proposals were good, but
wouldn't solve the cost questions.
He said many people eligible for the
credits won't use them, "and they
won't be covered."

DEAN
Continued from page 1
She added, "With the recession time
it's important that we have someone
who is good at fundraising."
Pao emphasized that the new
dean must continue the progress
made by Warner in the last six
years. She said Warner "has done a
phenomenal job. This new person
that we're seeking must build on
that. ... We're not starting from
ground zero."
School of Information and
Library Studies graduate student
Leslie Riester, the only student
member of the six-person
committee, also stressed the
importance of acquiring a visionary
leader who will build on past
improvements.
"I think the dean has to be a
leader among the deans," Riester
said. "Our current dean is highly
respected and well-liked on the
campus. Our new dean will have to
continue that."
Riester said she is on the
committee to represent students'
interests, but has not yet acted in
this facility since the committee is
still in the preliminary stages of the
search.
"It's a lot of formulation so we
haven't really gotten to the point
where I'll be playing the role of
student rather than a committee
member," she said. "I'm there I
guess to balance - to remind - the
committee that there's an
obligation to the students as well as
research."
Pao emphasized that the
committee will refrain from
exposing candidates.

a
Warner
"We're keeping everything
confidential," she said.
"Confidentiality is extremely
important because we don't want to
lose candidates. If you embarrass
people when they have a good job,"
you can lose them."
Even though committee
members are aware of the recent
court decision claiming the
University violated the Open0
Meetings Act when directing the
search for University President
James Duderstadt, they are not A
shifting search techniques.
Pao said, "We're aware of the
newspaper information and we're
doing everything as fair as we can.
without sacrificing the individual.
We are not doing anything our
conscience tells us not to do."
Since the School of Information
and Library Studies only has an
estimated 270 students, committee
members demand a dean who will
make the smallest segment of the
University visible.

Prescription subscription
A University Health Service pharmacy employee prepares a prescription
for Zovirax ointment, commonly prescribed for herpes, yesterday.
by Bill Watterson State to

Calvin and Hobbes

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TIE MICHIGAN DAILY
GET THE FACTS
GET IHE DAILY C
GET THE FACTS 764-0552
GET THE DAILY fr
GET THE FACTS more
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NEWS *SPORTSe ARTS
OPINION & PHOTO

"p rivatiz e
liqu or
LANSING, Mich. (AP) - State
government is going ahead with
plans to turn over parts of the
state's liquor operation to private
enterprise, Gov. John Engler said
yesterday.
The governor said restructuring
the state's monopoly on the whole-
sale distribution of liquor will let
the Liquor Control Commission
concentrate on regulating estab-
lishments that sell liquor.
"The economic regulation, the
running of a business, is not some-
thing that is either inherently a gov-
ernment function or the government
is inherently good at," heasaid.
But the executive director of the
Michigan Interfaith Council on Al-
cohol Problems called it a mistake
to erode the state's control of the
liquor supply.

SEARCH
Continued from page 1
"It seems to be a really impor-
tant issue to most of (the presiden-
tial candidates). If we say we are go-
ing to interview, they give up the
right to anonymity," Herron said.
"When the final group of candi-
dates is recommended to the board
and in the final process when the
confidentiality is no longer relevant
to the candidates, the process shall
be open," a spokesperson for the
MSU news bureau said. Staff and
faculty voiced opposing opinions,

declaring they have thehright to
know information about the candi-,
dates and to assure they are selected
fairly.
Bud Hart, provost at the Oregon
Institute of Technology - a univer-
sity currently searching for a presi-
dent - said that according to thet
Oregon Public Meetings Law the
press may attend meetings as a
safeguard to assure fairness.
"Oregon can meet and discuss
personal matters closed to the pub-
lic, but press can be there to make
sure there is no 'good old boy'
stuff," he said.

0

L
DENTAL HEALTH DAY
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 8 - 9:00 am-12:00 noon
U of M DENTAL SCHOOL
FREE ORAL CANCER SCREENING FREE X-RAYS
FREE DENTAL HEALTH EVALUATION
ALL AGES ARE WELCOME ALL SERVICES ARE FREE
THE STUDENTS AND FACULTY OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN WILL
HOST THEIR ANNUAL DENTAL HEALTH DAY
Parking Is Available In The Fletcher St. Parking Lot
The School Is Located On The Corner Of N. University And Fletcher St.
Public May Enter Through Entrance Off North University,
Or Entrance Off Fletcher St.

BUDGET
Continued from page 1
lations, said he agreed with Engler's
assessment of the economic diffi-
culties facing the state in 1992, he
added he was encouraged when look-
ing at figures comparing Michigan's
funding for higher education to
other states' educational funding.
"There is no reason to be terribly
depressed, but there is not much
room for enthusiasm," he said..
Schwarz said one possible source
of revenues for higher education is
his bill which would increase the
state tax on all tobacco products.
The bill - comparable to one
introduced in the House by Rep.
Perry Bullard (D-Ann Arbor) and
Rep. William Bryant (R-Grosse
Pointe) - would raise the tax on
each pack of cigarettes by 25 cents.
While the Bullard-Bryant bill
would devote all tax revenues to
health initiatives, the Schwarz bill
would use 40 percent of the income
for health and 60 percent for
education.
Schwarz said the result could be
a 3.5 percent increase in funding for
higher education.
"That would put downward

pressure on potential tuition
increases," he added.
According to the Lansing State
Journal, University President James
Duderstadt said students could ex-
pect to receive double-digit
increases in tuition.
While Duderstadt applauded En-
gler's commitment to education in
the new budget, he stressed the
'There is no reason to
be terribly depressed,
but there is not much
room for enthusiasm.'
- Keith Molin
Associate Vice President
for Government
Relations
University is facing financial
difficulties.
"It means that our universities
must make tough choices and sacri-
fices in order to hold down costs.
while continuing to educate the,
people and produce the ideas needed.
to achieve greater prosperity for all.
our citizens in the long term,"
Duderstadt said in a statement.

U of M DENTAL SCHOOL

763-6933

The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967) Is published Monday through Friday during the Fall and Winter terms by
students at the University of Michigan. On-campus subscription rate for falVwinter 91-92 is $30; all other
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The Michigan Daily is a member of the Associated Press and the Associated Collegiate Press.
ADDRESS: The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-1327.
PHONE NUMBERS (All area code 313): News 764-0552; Opinion 747-2814; Arts 763-0379; Sports 747-3336;
Circulation 764-0558; Classified advertising 764-0557; Display advertising 764-0554; Billing 764-0550.

0i

Your Summer ob
more than just emp1OY ment..e

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Working with'childrer
in the outdoors.

1

NEWS Henry Goldblatt Managing Editor
EDITORS David Rhdfngol.Bethany Robertson, Steane Vines, Kenneth Wulker
STAFF: Lad Barager, Barry Cochen, Ben Devi, Lauren Dormer, Erin Esnhom; Ren6s Huckle, Andrew Levy, Robin utwin,Trrnuls
McReynolds, Josh Meddler, Rob Patton, Melissa Peedese, Karen Pier, Mona Ourehi, Karen Sabgir, Gwen Shaffer, Purvi Shah,
Jennifer Siverberg, David Wartowaki, Chastity Wilson.
OPINION Yael Citro, Geoff Earle, Amitava Mazumdar, Editors
STAFF: Matt Adler, Jenny Alix. Daren Hubbard, David Laitner, Jennifer Mattson, Ari Rotenberg, Dave Rowe, David Shepardson,
Daniel Stewart.
SPORTS John Niyo, Managing Editor
EDITORS: Josh Dubow, Albertt in, Jeff Wiwns
STAFF: Andy DeKorte K mbery DeSempelaere, Matthew Dodge, Shawn DuFresne, Joni Durst. Jin Foss, Ryan Herdngton. Mike Hill,
Bruce Inosendo, Dan Unna, Rod Loewenthal, Sharon Lundy, Adam Miller, Rid Mitvalsky, Tim Rarin, Chad Safran, Todd
Schoenhaus, Enc Sidar, Tim Spolar, Andy Stabile, Ken Sugiura.
ARTS Elizabeth Lenhard, Michael John Wilson, Editors
EDITORS: Mark Binli (Fihn), Janie Dahlmann (Theater), Diane Frneden (Fine Arts), Alan J. Hogg, Jr. (Books), Julie Komom
(Weekend eta.), Annetef.Petnuso (Mujsic).
STAFF: Nick Arvin. Greg BUse, Mago Baumgart. Skot Beal, Kenny Bell, Jen Biik, Andrew J. Cahn, Jonathan Chait, Richard S.
Davis, Gabrel Feldberg, Rosanne Freed, Lynn Geiger, Forrest Green I, Aaron Hamburger, Jonathan Higgins, Nima Hodai, Roger
Hslaa.Maens Jacobson, Kristin Knudsen, Mike Ko"od, Kristen McMurtry, Amy Meng. Josh Mitnick, John Morgan, Dan Poux, Austin
Rainer, Jeff Rosenberg, Christine Slovey, Kevi Stein, Scott Sterling, Alissa Strauss, Josh WorthKim Yged.
PHOTO Kristoffer Gillette, Kenneth J. Smoller, Editors
STAFF: Brian Cantoni, AnIhony M. Croll, Michelle Guy, Doug Kanter, Heather Lowmnan, Sharon Musher, Suzie Paley, Molly Stevens,
Pal Taylor

. P."Nwm -Oww-qw

JO )sTENS

Counselors, --
staff and o er visors, administrative
ther leadership positions.

Stop by and see a Jostens representative,
TndrmIvFri FPh 7 .11 nm tno 4.n m

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