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December 10, 1991 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1991-12-10

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The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, December 10, 1991 - Page 3

Computer
center has
*record
waitlists
by Jennifer Silverberg
Daily Staff Reporter
A record number of students are
lining up at the Angel Hall comput-
ing center as the semester draws to a
*lose. Approximately 350 people
waited for three to four hours Sun-
day night to use a computer, moni-
tors said.
"It was crowded and busy and
nobody looked happy - except the
monitors of course," said LSA se-
nior Val Washington, who was at
the computing center Sunday night.
"I waited for two hours with a
riend. We went shopping and got
V7ood while we waited."
At 8:30 p.m. yesterday there was
a waitlist of about 350 students, and
computing center employees ex-
pected that number to increase as the
night went on.
"There's a record back-up this
term. It's busier than most because
more people are becoming computer
literate and summer orientation in-
oduces new students to this com-
uting center," said Jeff Adams,
who works at the Angel Hall com-
puting center. "They always bring
them to this site so people have it in
their minds that this is the only
place to come."
About 2,000 students use the 350
computers at the 24-hour Angel
Hall computing center each day. On
average, 40 or 50 students wait less
Ohan 30 minutes. Extreme waits be-
gan last week, said Brian McRae, an
Angel Hall Computing Center em-
ployee. Angel Hall is the only com-
puting center with waits of more
than 100 students.
"I think there are long waits be-
cause of the way the school calendar
is set up this year. There are fewer
days to work after Thanksgiving and
maybe teachers are giving more pa-
*ers," McRae said.
Computing center officials said
as many as 280 students had been on
waitlists in previous years, but they
had never seen a list as long as it was
on Sunday night.
"People are not here just typing,
they are here writing," Adams said.
"The average time on any terminal
is a lot longer than if someone came
4n with a typed paper."
Some of those in line said that a
time limit on computer use would
force students to come prepared, and
would help eliminate the long lines
and waiting times.
"I'm a transfer student from
Central (Michigan University) and
they had a one-hour time limit on a
computer. You had to come pre-
pared. Here I come and type as I
W ink of it. There I had it done be-
fore I went in," said Martin
Schultz, an LSA junior.
Many students said they had ex-
pected long lines from experiences
in previous years.
"My paper's due in 15 minutes.
It's my own fault. I knew it'd be a
wait but I had no idea that it'd be
two hours," said Stacia Frederick, an

LSA junior.

Council holds hearing
on alcohol regulations

by Sarah Schweitzer
Daily News Editor
As part of an ongoing effort to
eliminate irresponsible alcohol use,
the Ann Arbor City Council invited
representatives of the Michigan
Liquor Control Commission (LCC)
to a public hearing last night to ad-
dress both councilmember and citi-
zen concerns.
Much of the discussion focused
on clearing up ambiguities as to
where the LCC's role ends and
where the city's role begins in alco-
hol control.
Randy Martin, deputy director
of the LCC's enforcement division,
explained that the LCC serves only
as an administrative body of the
state and therefore has no power to
issue arrests.
Yet, he said, the commission does
have a team of 61 investigators who
are periodically sent into bars and
other establishments serving alco-
hol to look for liquor law viola-
tions - such as the sale of alcohol
to a minor.

The investigators operate under-
cover, wearing plain clothes, and
simply observe patrons, he said. And
if they find violations, they may
bring suit against the owner of the
business.
The LCC representatives sug-
gested that to better control alco-
hol consumption, the city could in-
crease the fee required to obtain a
liquor license, provided the in-
creased funds could be shown to be
necessary for alcohol regulation.
Another measure suggested was
a limitation on the number of liquor
licences issued each year.
Councilmember Larry Hunter
(D-1st Ward) focused his line of
questions on the right of alcohol
serving establishments to deny cus-
tomers service, in reference to inci-
dents in the summer of 1990 when.
Black patrons accused the Full
Moon and Quality Bar of refusing
them service.

Martin said the LCC has no ju-
risdiction in such matters. Yet, un-
der the Civil Rights Act, he said,
any establishment could deny ser-
vice for any reason other than one
based on race, religion, creed, or
gender.
"If they don't like you, they
don't have to serve you," Martin
said.
But he added that the city could
come up with more narrowly
defined guidelines for instances in
which service could be denied.
Councilmember Robert Grady
(D-3rd Ward) said after the meet-
ing that the opportunity to hear the
representatives speak had answered
many questions which had been
asked of him by constituents.
He added that knowing the
guidelines by which the city has to
work would allow it to take a more
effective regulatory role than
before.

Alex Haley, Carole Simpson
to address MLK programs

Rackham Student John Zipper takes a number at the Angel Hall
computing center last night With 957 up next, there are less than 200
students ahead of him in line.
Panhel, IFC to decide
BYOB alcohol policy

by Ben Deci
Daily Staff Reporter
Controversy and feuding be-
tween houses in the Greek system
may come to an end this week when
the Panhellenic Association (Pan-
hel) and the Interfraternity Council
(IFC) vote to confirm or reject a
new alcohol policy.
The policy's final draft has been
presented to both the Panhel and
IFC and it is now up. to general as-
semblies of both those bodies to de-
cide its fate. Panhel will vote to-
night and IFC tomorrow.
The proposed policy stipulates
that, without a waiver from the fra-
ternity's national organization, no
alcohol will be purchased with that
fraternity's funds and each party
will be observed by a "student re-
sponsibility committee." Some rep-
resentatives, however, expressed
doubt about whether its stringent
regulations would be followed.
The policy comes as Ann Arbor
police are taking stringent measures
to regulate fraternity parties, and
the National Interfratemnity Coun-
cil has targeted the University for
observation because of its lack of an
alcohol policy.
"There's pressure from many
different sources. Even if the policy
is not ratified, I don't anticipate the
issue dying," IFC President Matt
Commers said.

"But, I'm very optimistic. This
policy represents a democratic ap-
proach and a good deal of compro-
mise," he added.
Commers' optimism is not
echoed by all IFC members. Liam
Caffery, the IFC representative
from Delta Kappa Epsilon, said he
feels the committee that drafted the
-policy did not consider all the per-
spectives of the issue.
"Chances are fairly slim that
this will pass. I don't feel that this
represents a majority of Greeks, and
it doesn't take that many houses to
kill it," Caffery added.

by Mona Qureshi
Daily Staff Reporter
Alex Haley - the author of
Roots, The Autobiography of Mal-
colm X, and many other works -
will be among the featured speakers
at this year's Martin Luther King Jr.
Day on Jan 20., the University has
announced.
Former State Supreme Court
Justice and Detroit mayoral con-
tender Dennis Archer; ABC News
anchor Carole Simpson; and
Maulana Karenga, chair of the De-
partment of Black Studies at Cali-
fornia State University, Long Beach,
will also speak at events commemo-
rating the life and work of the slain
civil rights leader.
Simpson was scheduled to ad-
dress LSA graduates at last spring's
commencement, but was replaced by
President George Bush when he
agreed to speak at a University-wide
graduation ceremony.
The University will close down.
to reflect on King's teachings in a
series of workshops and lectures in

Cultures," will cover images of the
future in the areas of work, family,
health care, the environment and
other issues, said Bunyan Bryant,
Symposium co-chair and associate
professor of Natural Resources.
'in the 1990s, we are
asking (students) to go
to the inner cities and
help rebuild them'
- Bunyan Bryant
MLK Symposium
co-chair'
One of the major sessions will be
"The Future of Detroit: A Devel-
opment Project," Bryant said. He
said its purpose will be to encourage
students from all over the country
to go to Detroit to help rebuild the
city.
"In the 1960s, students went
south for the Civil Rights Move-

ment. In the 1990s, we are asking
them to go to the inner cities and
help rebuild them," he said.
Each speaker is sponsored by a
specific school, with Simpson being
sponsored by the School of Business
Administration, Bryant said. The
Office of Minority Affairs is coor-
dinating the overall program.
Bryant said the University
should be commended for setting
aside a day to remember King, but hi
added it still needs to work on race,
relations.
MLK Day was originally de-
manded by student anti-racist ac-
tivists, and subsequently recognized
by the University.
Archer will deliver the day's
opening speech at 9 a.m. in Rackham
Auditorium, and Karenga will close
with the keynote address at 8 p.m.
"It seems to me that Martin
- gave his life for the oppressed peo-
ple. We have to revisit his legacy at
least once a year to remind us of the
unfinished agenda," he said.

Correction

-j

A picture about Amnesty International in yesterday's Daily should
have been credited to Anthony M. Croll.
THE LIST
What's happening in Ann Arbor today

The proposal needs a two-thirds the fifth MLK Symposium.
majority to pass IFC, and three- This year's theme, "The Path to
quarter for Panhel. Empowerment: Redefining Our
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Meetings
Time and Relative Dimensions in
Ann Arbor, weekly mtg. 2439 Mason,
8 p.m.
Housing Rights Coalition. M LB
B137, 7:30.
Christian Science Organization.
League, ask at front desk for location,
6:15.
Speakers
"A Perspective on Iran," Abalfath
Aghassa. International Center, noon.
Furthermore
Safewalk, night-time safety walking
service. Sun-Thur, 8 p.m.-1:30 a.m.
and Fri. and Sat. 8 p.m. - 11:30 p.m.
Stop by 102 UGLi or call 936-1000.
Extended hours are 1 a.m. -3 a.m. at
the Angell Hall Computing Center or
call 763-4246.
Safewalk's last day of service will be

p.m. Stop by 2333 Bursley or call 763-
WALK.
Northwalk's last day of service will be
Wednesday, December 11.
Kaffeestunde, German coffee hour,
every Tuesday. MLB 3rd floor conf rm,
4:30-6.-
ECB Peer Writing Tutors. An-
gell/Mason Computing Center, 7-11.
Church Street, 7-9.
U-M Swim Club, Tuesday workout.
IM Pool, 6:30-8:30.
Women's Rugby, Tuesday practice.
Mitchell Field, 5:45-8 p.m.
"Harlan County, U.S.A.," documen-
tary. SPARK Revolutionary History
Series. MLB Rm B122, 7-8.
The Yawp literary magazine is accept-
ing manuscripts and artwork in 1210
Angell.
"Against Greed," submissions ac-
cepted. $100 will be donated to charity
for each acceptable work. Due to Bert

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