100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 06, 1991 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1991-12-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page 2-The Michigan Daily- Friday, December 6, 1991

TELLERS
Continued from page 1
easier," said LSA first-year student
Katherine Jablonski, who used a
Comerica ATM machine yesterday.
"Right now, I don't need to go to
the cashier's office, but I could in
the future ... I think this would be
a good idea."
Susan Vance, a program assis-
tant at the Seminole Access Center
at Florida State University, said
FSU students have been very recep-
tive to their ATM system in-
stalled last fall.
"All incoming students auto-
matically get the card, and about
3,500 other students and staff have
gotten in on the system," Vance
said.
The main difference between
FSU's system and the University's
plan is that FSU's program is run
under First Florida Bank, and, for a

$0.75 charge per transaction, dou-
bles as a bank card.
Middlemas said the University
card would not be bank-affiliated.
"There are some legal questions
that have to be answered as far as
our stepping on any toes by pre-
tending we're a bank, which we're
not," Middlemas said.
Vance said FSU students use the
card to pay their tuition, their cable
and phone bills if they live on cam-
pus, their meal plan and health cen-
ter fees, or for athletic tickets and
parking permits - provided the
money is available in their account.
And in the spring, Vance said the
access cards will replace student
IDs, and will also include a "junk
stripe," which will allow students
to use the card in campus vending
machines.
"The card also acts like a credit
card on a debit system in campus
and non-university stores. All the
bookstores and a lot of the restau-

rants take it," Vance said.-
Although Middlemas said this
kind of cash-free campus is not the
original intention of the Univer-
sity ATM's, he said features could
be added gradually if the system is
established.
Paul Rosser, the general man-
ager of Ulrich's bookstore, said he
would gladly accept a credit card
like FSU's. "I have been interested
in getting in on the Entrde Plus
card, but we've been told that we
can't," Rosser said. "I know a lot
of the area restaurants are very in-
terested as well."
LSA senior Becky Travis said
she favors the cash-free idea, but
added she is concerned about the
University becoming increasingly
impersonal.
"I don't want to end up talking
to machines all day," Travis said.
Another drawback she was con-
cerned about is losing interest on
money that could be in a bank.

MUIR

4

The University is considering installing ATM machines that would accept
student ID cards.

p U

.*IN

The University ofichigan Chapter
of the
N(ational.association for the
.advancement of Cofored People
with
the University of9Michigan
School of'Education
present
Dr. Deborah fGcrtff
Superintentden t of
6Detroit P6ubtic Scfoofs
speaking on
Ufrban 'Ediucation in America
Sunday, 8 Decem6er 1991 " 7:00 p.m.
iackjam.flmphitheatre
Rackham Schoof of Graduate Studies

Starting your job search?
Plan to attend...
KICK-OFF
SATURDA
Saturday, December 7
9:10 am-Noon
CP&P Program Room
Job Search
9:10-10:00
Resume Writing
10:10-11:00
I Interviewing
11:10-Noon

o ,
o

.p

Y

11

TUITION
Continued from page 1
state legislators.
"There could be a liability on the
state general fund," said Sen. John
Schwarz (R-Battle Creek), co-chair
of the Higher Education subcom-
mittee.
"It is a loss to the public. I like
the MET program because it encour-
aged people to make a commitment
to education," said Sen. Lana Pol-
lack (D-Ann Arbor).
"My parents saved for years for
my education and it is a real sign of
the times that people are going to
the savings bond plan which isn't as
innovative as the guaranteed pro-
gram," she added.
University administrators said
they are pleased with the new plan.
"The MET board had questions
about the solvency of the program
when they met before," said Keith
Molin, associate vice president for
government relations. "If the sav-
ings bond plan is a substitute, that is
good, since they are getting their
questions answered."
But not everyone is reacting fa-
vorably to the new plan.
Guy Clark, president of the
RESEARCH
Continued from page 1
risks and support research," he said.
Steiss added that the University
retains ownership of the technol-
ogy, or "intellectual property."
Stephanie Epstein, the author of
the report, released her findings yes-
terday during a press conference.
The study investigates Japanese
investment in U.S. universities, sci-
entific research, lower school cur-
ricula and teachers, and Washington
think-tanks.
The report states that for
decades, the government has used
substantial amounts of taxpayers'
money to build a strong research and
development educational infras-
tructure. And now Japan is buying
into the high-tech fruits of U.S. uni-
versities' labors.
According to the study, Japan has
attempted to influence U.S. opinion
toward its main trade rival. For in-
stance, it cites Japanese financing for
trips to its country for U.S. school
teachers who upon returning, share

Continued from page 1
case it's meaningless.
"If she's a yes-person, so is ev-
erybody else in the party caucus."
According to Grady, City Coun-
cil Democrats work to build a con-
sensus in caucus meetings in order to
present a united front in council
meetings, which creates the appear-
ance of little conflict over most{,
issues.
Grady said the recent vote on the- l
city's new noise violation ordinance,-
which passed by a vote of 10-0 in fa-ti
vor, is an example of the Democrats'.>
consensus-building procedure. "Ori-
ginally, we could have passed it 6-5,.,
but we didn't want to do that."
Muir's position on Peterson's.,.
participation in council politics is 4
"superficial analysis," Grady said.-
"It's based on somebody who's just,,,
been reading headlines. ... That's,,
probably what he's been doing." -
Michigan Collegiate Coalition, a
student lobbying group in Lansing, ,
said the new program isn't as inno-
vative as some claim.
"It is an unsubsidized program
which anyone can do on their own,",
he said. "The real people affected by
the change are prospective MET
contract holders who will have aprbe rigt e otat:
problem trying to get contracts."
Clark added that part of Engler's'
desire to change the MET program
stems from his relationship with .
universities determining tuition
rates.
"Gov. Engler has not interfered
with universities in tuition deci-'
sions, but now universities are rais--
ing tuition so much that it may-'
make the MET program impossi- 1
ble," Clark said. "Part of the reason.{
people have proposed tuition caps is'
to keep the MET program possible.
By not choosing to maintain tuition
caps, Engler has chosen not to make-'
MET viable."
Molin disagreed with Clark.
"Universities are autonomous in.
tuition decisions. Gov. Blanchard
was the first governor in the state
to interfere in tuition policies. The-
governor has simply done what his
predecessors, except for Blanchard,
have done," Molin said.
their experiences with students,,
aided by information from Japanese,
educators.

11r L .h tof.% ..e
CareerPannin cent

Reception to follow

-
p

Religious
Services
AVAVAVAVA
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Serving the U-M Campus for over 50 Years)
1236 WashtenawCt.
(one block south of CCRB)
668-7421/662-2402
Rev. Don Postema, Pastor
SUNDAY WORSHIP:
'Advent: Waiting with Patience"-10 a.m.
WEDNESDAY:
Undergrad R.O.C.K.. Group: Refreshments,
fun, provocative discussions-9-10:30 p.m.
CANTERBURY HOUSE
(The Episcoal Church of U-M)
SONDAYS:
Holy Eucharist-5 p.m. at
St. Andrew's church
Dinner-6 p.m. at Canterbury House
Canterbury House & St. Andrew's
(corner of Division and Catherine Street)
Call 665-0606
* FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH AND
AMERICAN BAPTIST CAMPUS CENTER
Huron Street (between State & Division)
Worship-9-55 a.m.
Bible Study Groups-12:20 a.m.
WEDNESDAYS:
Student Fellowship Supper
and Bible Study-5:30 p.m.
For information, call 663-9376
Larry Greenfield, Minister
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
(Between Hill & South University)
SUNDAYS:
Worship-9:30 & 11 a.m.
Campus Faith Exploration Discussion,
Bagels & coffee served-9:30 a.m.
THURSDAYS:
Campus Worship & Dinner-5:30 p.m.
For information, call 662-4466
Amy Morrison, Campus Pastor
LUTHERAN CAMPUS MINISTRY
LORD OF LIGHT LUTHERAN CHURCH, ELCA
801 South Forest (at Hill Street), 668-7622
SUNDAY: Worship-10 a.m.
WEDNESDAY: Bible Study-6 p.m.
Evening Prayer-7 p.m.
ST. MARY'S STUDENT PARISH
(A Roman Catholic Parish at U-M)
331 Thompson Street
SAT.: Weekend Liturgies-5 p.m., and
SUN.:-8:30 a.m., 10 a.m., 12 noon,
5 p.m., and 7 p.m.
EL; Confessions-45 p.m.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL-LCMS
1511 Washtenaw " 663-5560
SATURDAY: Evening Worship-6:30 p.m.

SELL YOUR BOOKS TO
THE MICHIGAN UNION
BOOKSTORE
AND GET
CA$H PLU$
CA$H PLUS
THE BEST PRICES IN TOWN
CA$H PLU$
ENTRY IN A DRAWING
GRAND PRIZE: WINTER 92 TEXTBOOKS
1ST PRIZE: $50 FREE MICHIGAN CLOTHING
2ND PRIZE: $25 FREE MICHIGAN CLOTHING
PLU$
DAILY PRIZES!!!
CA$H PL U$
OR
CREDIT TO YOUR ENTREE PLUS ACCOUNT!
CA$H PL U$

The study also states that Japan-
has donated substantial funds td
five think-tanks in Washington that:
determine potential U.S.-Japanese
policies.
The extent of the Japanese in-
vestment in the United States has
not been disclosed because no public
records exist. The government re-
quired investment to be reported to
the Department of Education from
1986 until the law mandating such
disclosure expired in 1989.
Charles Lewis, executive direc+4
tor of the Center for Public In-
tegrity, said he is baffled by the cur-
tailing of legislation requiring doc::
umentation of foreign investment.
He said the study has a two-fold,'
significance - it asks whether the,
United States should subsidize
other countries with its research and;
development financed by taxpayers,,
and states that there must be public
disclosure of foreign investment.
been," he said.
First-year pharmacy student
Scott McCreadie said, "To me per-:
sonally it does not mean a whop f
lot. It was a long time ago. I wasn 't,
even here. It's almost like any other:
event in history."
ganiBaiIg
Monday through Friday during the fall and winter
ampus subscription rate for fallNinter91-92 is $30;
$149 - prorated at Nov. 1, 1991, to $105. Fall
d at Nov.1 to $46. Subscriptions must be prepaid.
Press and the Associated Collegiate Press.
let, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-1327.
iion 747-2814, Arts 763-0379, Sports 747-3336,
7, Display advertising 764-0554, Billing 764-0550.

HARBOR
Continued from page 1
execution of a really daring plan to
immobilize the American fleet -
and that we were caught really un-
aware, which we should not have
(Ite 4 -er
Hirt
The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967) is published h
terms by students at the University of Michigan. On-c
all other subscriptions via first class U.S. mail are
subscription only via first class mail is $75- prorate
The Michigan Daily is a member of The Associated
ADDRESS: The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard Stre
PHONE NUMBERS: News (313) 764-0552, Opin
Circulation 764-0558, Classified advertising 764-055

EDITOFAAL STAFF:
Editor in Chief
Managing Editor
News Editors
Opinion Editor
Associate Editor
Editorial Assistants
Weekend Editor
Associate Editor
Photo Editor

Andrew Gottesman
Josh Mick
Philip Cohen, Christine
Kloostra, Donna Woodwell,
Sarah Schweitzer
Stephen Henderson
Katie Sanders
Yael Citro, Geoff Earle,
Amitava Mazumdar
GO Renberg
Jesse Walker
KemethJ. Smoer

Managing Sports Editor
SportsEditors
Arts Editors
Books
Film
Fine Arts
Music
Theater
List Editor

Matt Rennie
Theodore Cox, Phil Green, John Niyo
Jeff Sheran, Dan Zoch
Mark Binell, Elizabelh Lenhard
valerie Shuman
Michael John Wison
Jule Komom
Annette Petrusso
Jenie Dahmann
Chrisine Kloosta

News: Merav Barr, Barry Cohen, Lynne Cohn, Ben Deci, Lauren Dormer, Henry GddbIatt, Andrew Levy, Robin Litwin, Travis
McReynolds, Josh Medoder, Uju Oraka, Rob Patton, Melissa Peerless, Karen Pier, Tami Polak, Mona Oureshi, David Rheingdd,
Be"hany Robertson, Karen Sabgr, Jule Schupper, Gwen Shaffer, Purv Shah, Jennifer Slverberg, Stefanie Vines, JoAnne
Viviano, Ken Walker, David Warowsi,Chasity Wilson.
Opinion: Matt Adler, Chris Atenduis, Brad Bernatek,Renee Bshey,Erin Einhorn, David Leitner, Brad Miler, Ari Rotenberg,
David Shepardson.
Sprts: Ken Davidoff, Andy DeKorteKlmberly DeSempelaers, Matthew Dodge, Josh Dubow, Shawn DuFresne, Jim Foss, Ryan
Herrington, Bruce Inosendo, Albert Un, Dan Unna, Rod Loewenthal, Sharoniundy, Adam Miler, Rich Witvalsky, Tim Rain,
Chad Satan, David Schechter, Eric Sklar, Tim Spoiar, Andy Stabile, Ken Sugiura, Jeff Wilams.
Arts: Mck Arvin, Greg Base, Skot Beal, Kenny Bell, Jen Bilik, Andrew J. Cahn, Richard S. Davis, Brent Edwards, Gabriel
Feldberg, Rosanne Freed, Diane Frieden, Lynn Geiger, Forrest Green IIl, Aaron Hamburger, Nima Hodaei, Alan J. Hogg, Roger
Hsiarie Jacobson, Ksin Knudson, Mike Kdody, Mike Kuiavsky, Amy Meng, John Morgan, Liz Patton, Ausin Ratiner,
AntniRaue. Jeff RoseInera. wnChristine Slovev. Kevain. Scot5tei, ?~n.Kim Yavad.

4@

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan