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November 26, 1991 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1991-11-26

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Page 2-The Michigan Daily- Tuesday, November 26, 1991

MIDEAST
Continued from page 1
kind," he said upon his return to Is-
rael on Sunday.
S.yria held back its reply amid re-
ports it would insist as a precondi-
tion that Israel agree to consider in
the negotiations a withdrawal from
the Golan Heights, the disputed ter-
ritory Israeli forces occupied in the
1967 Six-Day War.
Spokeswoman Tutwiler said
"myself and others here are puz-
zled" by accusations of mistreat-
ment from Israel officials.
She said while Washington was

not the first choice of any of the
parties, holding the talks in the cap-
ital had been discussed over several
months with Israeli officials.
Baker's spokesperson said the
deadline for a decision had been de-
'There is no crisis of
confidence'
- Yitzhak Shamir
layed several times. On one occasion
the delay was in response to a re-
quest last Tuesday by Zalman
Shoval, the Israeli ambassador.
Besides, Tutwiler said, Baker

waited a week longer than origi-
nally planned in selecting a time and
place after the Arabs and Israel
were unable to decide on their own.
Indicating the deadline would be
pushed back for a few days,
Tutwiler said, "Our deadline was
merely a deadline for planning pur-
poses. We do have an obligation to
have facilities, to have security, to
have people met at the airport, et
cetera. So it was in our best estimate
a date that would help us do a good
job of facilitating these delegates or
negotiators when they come here. So
if the deadline comes and goes, it
come and goes."

SOVIET
Continued from page 1
people, the Ukraine is an agricul-
tural and industrial power, and
Gorbachev has said a union without
it was "unthinkable."
Several changes are to be made
in the Union Treaty before it is
sent to the legislatures, Gorbachev
said. He did not spell out the revi-
sions.
The treaty would limit the

Kremlin's role to foreign affairs,
strategic nuclear arms, and coordi-
nation of economic policy. It also
would establish a five-year, di-
rectly elected national presidency
and an independent judiciary and
would let the republics introduce
their own currencies.
Part of yesterday's debate ap-
parently centered on whether the
new union would be a real nation
or merely an association similar to

the European Community. Gor-
bachev said it was agreed to keep it
as a "confederated democratic
state."
Participating in the session
were Russian President Boris
Yeltsin and the leaders or top offi-
cials of the republics of Kaza-
khstan, Uzbekistan, Tadzhikistan,
Turkmenia, Kirgizia, and Byelorus-
sia. Absent were the Ukraine,
Moldavia, Azerbaijan, Armenia,
and Georgia.

Don't leave home without it
Kuwana Eiji, a Business school faculty member, purchases tickets to Chicago to see the Chicago Symphony
Orchestra in December.

Tell Us What You Think
Send your letters to:
The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard, Ann Arbor, MI 48109
II

POLICY
Continued from page 1
made a lot of fraternities vote yes."~
Among those who supported the
new version of the plan was Bill
Lewis, previously the plan'sbmost
vocal opponent. Lewis, a member of
Chi Psi fraternity, described the old
policy last week as, "The first step
in breaking the autonomy of
individual fraternities."
Despite the committee approval,
there is still a great deal of
speculation about whether the
policy will pass.
Liam Caffrey, the Delta Kappa

Epsilon representative on the
committee, voted against the plan.
"I still don't feel that this policy
represents the majority of Greeks.
Out of those that were present,
about five houses voted 'no,' but
there were a lot that weren't
present who obviously don't
support the plan," Caffrey said.
Caffrey said the new
compromise does not guarantee the
proposal's success. "Before, the
SRC compromise the plan was
doomed to fail, but chances are still
pretty slim. Either way, it's going
to be one hell of a fight," he said.
One issue Caffrey cited as
important to fraternities which

opposedgthe new proposal was its
handling by the committee's
leaders. He described the policy as
being "railroaded through" by
"scare tactics" such as National
Interfraternity Council (NIC)
threats.
The NIC has named the
University a "target campus," and
will send representatives this
winter to observe the Greek system
out of concern that problems exist.
The bylaws of the NIC
specifically state that the body
"shall not make laws that infringe
on the autonomy of individual
chapter organizations."

MERRILL LYNCH & CO.
CORPORATE FINANCE ANALYST PROGRAM
Merrill Lynch is currently seeking candidates for 2-year financial
analyst positions in the Financial Institutions Group of
Investment Banking at the Chicago office.

New analysts will attend a training program at Merrill Lynch
World Headquarters in New York City, then return to Chicago.
A brief job description is on file at the Career Planning and
Placement office.
Interested seniors should send a resume and transcript to the
address below no later than December 18, 1991:
Brad Vander Ploeg
Investment Banking
Merrill Lynch & Co.
5500 Sears Tower
Chicago, IL 60606

CURFEW
Continued from page 1
BYU senior Bart Poulson said
trying to find two women friends
to walk through campus with him
on Thursday was a real hassle.
"(Women's feeling of vulnera-
bility) always seemed curious to me
because I could go out for walks at
three in the morning," Poulson said.
"It is difficult to get used to. Now
when I go out at night I have to
think twice, but I am not faced with
nearly the same threat as women."
SAVINGS ON BIG JOBS
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Roberts said that while the cur-
few would obviously not stop rapes
altogether, the proposal has shocked
some people into realizing the ap-
proaches taken so far have not
worked. "We need to quit arming
women to the teeth," Roberts said.
VOICE members said although
escort services and rape prevention
seminars are made available to
women, these "solutions" go
against the group's main point,
which questions why women should
have to live any differently than
men.
Administration officials said
they believe a male curfew could
potentially cause more problems,
rather than prevent them.
"It is generally not men on cam-
pus that are causing the problem. To
prohibit men on campus one night a
week would be a heyday for attack-
ers," Richards said. "All-female

campuses are not safe, so prohibiting
men from campus would not be
effective."
Poulson said he does not feel the
administration is doing a good job
of handling the problem of sexual
assaults on campus.
"The administration here is a
complete joke. They try so hard to
maintain an image that doesn't ex-
ist," Poulson said. "The university
is entirely image-oriented with no
character or substance."
Kata Issari, a counselor at the
University's Sexual Assault Pre-
vention and Awareness Center, said
she does not believe the curfew is an
effective tool for preventing rape.
"Rape is not an issue of where
men are, but an issue of what they
choose to do with their power," she
said. "Rape will not stop happening
when we use gimmicks, but when
men stop raping."

CONGRESS
Continued from page 1
dismantle as many as 15,000 tacti-
cal nuclear weapons over several
years.
The weapons include nuclear
mines, artillery shells, bombs and
short-range missile warheads that
President Mikhail Gorbachev has
promised to destroy. That promise
is similar to a pledge by President
Bush to get rid of tactical nuclear
weapons in the U.S. arsenal.'
The aid measure was a pared-
down version of a $1 billion Soviet
aid package that was withdrawn
less than two weeks ago after it ran
into a tide of anti-foreign aid feel-
ing in Congress.
Sen. Malcolm Wallop (R-

Wyo.)objected to "asking the U.S.
taxpayers to pay for dismantling
the very weapons that were con-
structed to destroy them."
Senate Intelligence Committee
Chair David Boren (D-Okla.) said
without intervention, "there is a
genuine threat of the proliferation
of nuclear weapons, of these
weapons falling into the wrong
hands."
The Senate added a condition
that the U.S. would seek parallel
agreements with any republic that
breaks away from the Moscow
government and directed the ad-
ministration to keep trying to clear
discrepancies between the number
of weapons Moscow says are
located in the treaty area and the
higher number estimated by U.S.
intelligence.

---I

MEET BILLY BRAGG AT

49P
FVA Aw

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