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November 07, 1991 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1991-11-07

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The Michigan Daily - Thursday, November 7, 1991 - Page 3

Moscow
mayor
*ann ounces
rationing
MOSCOW (AP) - As a dispir-
ited Soviet Union prepared for the
74th anniversary of a revolution
that promised peace, land and bread,
authorities yesterday pledged free
housing and affordable bread and
meat to Moscow residents.
Russian Federation President
Boris Yeltsin signed a decree abol-
ishing the Communist Party in his
republic. The party had been sus-
pended nationwide since the failed
hard-line coup last August.
Panicked by the prospect of
higher prices, Muscovites crowded
into bakeries and grocery stores for
*the third straight day, pushing,
shoving and sometimes shouting as
supplies dwindled quickly.
"We received bread as usual this
morning, but we ran out at 11 a.m.,"
said Galina Makarova, a clerk in a
Moscow bread store.
Moscow Mayor Gavriil Popov
promised to allow residents to take
possession of their current housing
at no cost. He also said coupons
would be issued in an effort to guar-
antee low-cost bread, meat, sausage,
butter and eggs in the face of ex-
pected price rises.
Gorbachev said foreign govern-
ments would help keep food sup-
plies at current levels.
Ivan Silayev, the senior Soviet
economic official, told reporters
0 that finance ministers of the seven
leading industrial democracies had
assured him a Soviet debt crunch
"will be settled with the help of
Western credits" within 10 days.
Gorbachev and Yeltsin scored a
joint victory in their effort to stop
the disintegration of the nation, as
the Ukraine and Moldavia agreed to
sign an economic pact for a Soviet
common market. The Ukraine is
considered the key to preserving the
union.
Yeltsin, president of the largest
Soviet republic, was planning to
sign a series of radical economic de-
crees to protect the population
against price increases and reduce
government control over foreign
trade and currency exchange rates.

Holiday hosts sought for foreign students

by Karen Sabgir
Daily Staff Reporter
LSA sophomore Leonah Shaw
does not want foreign students to
eat Thanksgiving dinner on campus
while most students go home to
their families.
Instead, Shaw is trying to orga-
nize a group of undergraduate stu-
dents interested in sharing some
turkey with students whose homes
are overseas.
The International Student Cen-
ter has tried to organize a Thanks-
giving dinner in the past, but has
lacked enough people to organize
or attend it, said Kay Clifford, the
center's program director.
When Shaw, a volunteer at the
center and a native of England,
started planning a Thanksgiving
meal for international students,

she decided that a traditional
dinner given at the center would be
cold and impersonal.
Foreign students would not be
able to understand the real concept
and traditions of Thanksgiving if
they are surrounded only by other
foreign students, Shaw said.
"They can see what a real
American family Thanksgiving is
like," she said.
RC sophomore David Gill has
already expressed some interest in
Shaw's program. He empathized
with foreign students who spend
the holiday alone.
"I spent spring break here last
year and it was kind of desolate,"
he said.
Shaw said she noticed last year
that some students were interested

in hosting foreign students, but
were too shy to invite them. She
hopes the new program will
"bridge the gap" between
nationalities.
Shaw plans to post signs in the
Shaw decided that a
traditional dinner
given at the center
would be cold and
impersonal
dormitories and around foreign
language classrooms to find out if
there is interest among undergradu-
ate students. The International Stu-
dent Center will then send surveys
to potential hosts to get basic in-

formation about what transporta-
tion and activities they can offer a
guest.
First-year RC student Chandra
Vostral already took the initiative
to invite a few Soviet students to
her home for Thanksgiving.
Vostral recently visited the Soviet
Union and spent some time wiih a
family there.
"I stayed with a Russian family
for a few days and I know how
much I got out of it. Those were
the best three days of my trip," she
said.
Vostral thinks the experience
of staying with an American
family supersedes the meaning of
the holiday because foreign
students are not used to celebrating
it.
Shaw's program sparked some

interest from first-year LSA stu-
dent Paul Boyce, who is from
Trinidad.
"It beats sitting here alone in
the dorm," said Boyce, who
explained that he has only seen
American family life on television.
The international students will
not be the only ones to benefit
from this experience, Shaw
predicted. "If people want to
practice speaking Spanish they can
invite a Spanish-speaking student
to their home," she said.
Shaw hopes to run a seminar for
the foreign students before Thanks-
giving to instruct them on proper
etiquette and to avoid problems
that could arise from culture
clashes. "Just sitting at a dinner
table, there are many things they
could do wrong," she said.

College Dems
callingall 19
ff. ....p.~r e s .cn 1 i1ate s

Pumpkin pudding?-
Jack, one of the few survivors of Halloween's annual pumpkin massacre, deteriorates yesterday on a State
Street porch ledge.
'U', city officials hl talks

by Tami Pollak
Daily Staff Reporter
As the 1992 presidential race
gears up, the University College
Democrats have decided to back
former California Gov. Jerry
Brown.
And Arkansas Gov. Bill Clinton.
And Iowa Sen. Tom Harkin.
And Nebraska Sen. Bob Kerrey,
and former Massachusetts Sen. Paul
Tsongas and Virginia Gov. Douglas
Wilder.
And New York Gov. Mario
Cuomo, if he announces his
candidacy.
This multi-candidate support is
not evidence of indecision in the
Democratic Party, but rather an at-
tempt to allow students to famil-
iarize themselves with some unfa-
miliar faces.
"Our goal is to educate and act as
a resource for students who want to
campaign for all different candi-
dates," said Jenny Marx, an LSA se-
nior and College Democrat.
Marx said the group is trying to
bring each of the five announced
candidates to campus, although only
Jerry Brown and Tom Harkin have
confirmed dates.

Brown, who addressed students
on campus last month before an-
nouncing his candidacy, is expected
to return this Friday. Harkin is
scheduled to appear Tuesday evening
as a regular stop on his campaign
trail, Marx said.
"I was pretty surprised about
the Jerry Brown turnout," said Dana
Miller, an LSA senior and president
of the College Democrats. "I think
there's a lot of support out there.
"We see ourselves as a way for
people to look into candidates or get
involved. We channel people toward
the campaigns they want to work
for, or give them information on the
various candidates," she said.
LSA junior ErichStempien said
College Democrats has helped him
organize Students for Harkin.
"I think pretty much all the
Democratic candidates have an iden-
tification problem at this point,"
Stempien said.
Miller said no other student
groups on campus have endorsed any
one candidate, and said her group
will wait until the spring to con-
sider rallying behind a single
campaign.

I qw

by Henry Goldblatt
Daily Administration Reporter
Top-level University adminis-
trators met with Mayor Liz Brater
and Ann Arbor City Council mem-
bers yesterday to discuss common
goals and problems that exist be-
tween the University and the city.
Yesterday's meeting was the
first in a possible series between
Ann Arbor officials and the admin-
istration.

"This meeting is all part of try-
ing our best to encourage more lines
of communication," University
President James Duderstadt said in
an interview yesterday.
He said, however, that the Uni-
versity and city must focus on long-
term planning.
"My belief is that we desper-
ately need to open up a strategic dia-
logue... and think about what Ann
Arbor is going to be in the year 2000
or 2020 and what do we want and

I

how do we get there," Duderstadt
said.
The meeting focused on a presen-
tation by Campus Planner Fred
Mayer that detailed the Univer-
sity's construction plans and pro-
jects for the upcoming years. Uni-
versity administrators also ex-
plained projects such as the con-
struction of Medical Science Re-
search Building III and the possible
renovation of the East Engineering
Building.

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THE LIST
What's happening in Ann Arbor today
University of Utah. Rackham East Lec
Meetings Rm,4 p.m.
Michigan Video Yearbook, weekly "Middle Judaism, 300 BCE-200 CE:
mtg. Union, 4th floor, 7:30. Toward a Comprehensive and Bias-
Tagar, Zionist student activists. Hillel, Free Approach to the Period," Dr.
6:30 p.m. Gabriele Boccaccini, University of
Intervarsity Christian Fellowship, Turin. 3050 Frieze, 4 p.m.
mtg. Dana, Rm 1040, 7 p.m. "Bloodless Warfare: Israel on the
Campus Crusade for Christ, weekly Media Battlefield," David Olesker,
mtg. Dental School Kellogg Aud, Institute for Countering Anti-Israel
GODS, 7-8. Propaganda. Hillel, 7:30.
External Relations Committee, Furthermore
weekly mtg. MSA Office, 3rd floor
Union, 7 p.m. Safewalk, night-time safety walking
Peace and Justice Commission. MSA service. Sun-Thur, 8 p.m.-1:20 a.m.
Office, 3rd floor Union, 7 p.m. and Fri. and Sat. 8 p.m. - 11:30 p.m.
U-M Biological Society. 4th floor Nat Stop by 102 UGLi or call 936-1000.
Sci, above library, 7 p.m. Extended hours are 1 a.m. -3 a.m. at
Society of Women Engineers. 1200 the Angell Hall Computing Center or
SECS, 6:15. call 763-4246.
Snowboard Club, mtg. 1117 S. Forest, Northwalk, North Campus safety
6 p.m. walking service. Sun-Thur 8 p.m.-1:30
Amnesty International, weekly mtg. a.m. and Fri. and Sat. 8 p.m.-11:30
MLB, B137, 7p.m. p.m. Stop by 2333 Bursley or call 763-
Islamic Circle. League, 3rd floor, 6:15. WALK
ACT-UP Ann Arbor. Union, Crofoot U-M Shorin-Ryu Karate-Do Club,
Rm, 7:30. practice. CCRB Martial Arts Rm, 7-8.
Japan Student Association. Union, U-M Swim Club, Thursday workout
Kuenzel Rm, 9 p.m. IM Pool, 6:30-8:30.
Palestine Solidarity Committee. ECB Peer Writing Tutors. An-
Film: "Native Sons." Union, Rm 2203, gell/Mason Computing Center, 7-11.
8 p.m. Women's Rugby, Tuesday practice.
Multi-Racial/Multi-Cultural Mitchell Field, 5:45-8.
Group, brown bag mtg. Call 764-4479 Medical School of the Caribbean,
for info. 3100 Union, noon.. presentation. 35 Angell Hall, 6:30.
Circle K. Union, rm 1209, 6 p.m. Russkij Chaj, Russian conversation
Speakers practice. MLB 3rd floor conf rm, 4-5.
International Women Info Session.
"Letteratura e Politica nell'Italia International Center, 4-6.
Contemporanea," Honorable Paolo "Cold Water: Cultural and
Volponi. Rackham East Conf Rm, 4 Academic Adjustment in a Foreign
p.m. Country," film. N. Campus Health
"Women and Witchcraft In Colonial Info Center, 7-9.
New England," Prof. Carol Karlsen. The Yawp Literary Magazine, sub-
Glacier Hills Retirement Center, 1200 missions accepted. 7629 Haven.
Earhart Rd, 7 p.m. For info call 761- "Should We Return to the 'Old
4320. World' of Criminal Procedure?" de-
"The USSR: Scientific Socialism or bate. Yale Kamisar v. Joseph Grano.
Gigantic Scam?" Lawrence Reed. 120 Hutchins Hall, 7:30.
Union, Pendleton Rm, 7:30. Career Planning and Placement.
"Hydrogen and CO Absorption on Interviewing. CP&P Program Rm,
Pt (111)," Gyeonga Son. 1640 Chem, 4 4:10-5.
n m_ The Rind ('rn. .mnlover n lreenta-

e At

PERSPECTIVES ON PEACE:
A JOURNALISTIC VIEW
issues and Questions Concerning the Arab-Israeli Crisis
Richard Straus Hisham MC

em

Editor of the Middle East Policy Survey
published in: The New York Times
The Washington Post
The Los Angeles'Times
Professor Rai
Professor of P
Arab-Israel
Where: Rackham Graduate Aud.

Washington based correspondent for
As-Safir(Leading Lebanese daily)
Middle East correspondent for CNN
Consultant on:
"Mcneil-Lehrer News Hour"
"r**Iline"
-11Ming

VmOnd Tanter
olitical Science
i expert
itor

.
, . JO

Tickets:
Free for students

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