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November 06, 1991 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1991-11-06

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The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, November 6, 1991 - Page 3

High court
approves
esuing gov't
officials
WASHINGTON (AP) - State
officials who violate someone's
rights while performing govern-
mental duties may be sued and
forced to pay monetary damages, the
Supreme Court ruled yesterday.
* The 8-0 decision in a
Pennsylvania case could expose of-
ficials to costly lawsuits when they
are accused of violating a Civil War-
era federal law aimed at preventing
abuses of power.
"Imposing personal liability on
state officers may hamper their per-
formance of public duties," Justice
Sandra Day O'Connor wrote for the
court.
But she said the law is clear:
State officials are not immune from
being sued "solely by virtue of the
official nature of their acts."
In other developments, the
court:
. Heard arguments in an
Illinois dispute over the use of
hearsay evidence in child sex abuse
cases. At issue is whether juries may
hear statements allegedly, victim-
ized children make to others if the
young accusers do not testify at
trial.
Heard arguments in a Texas
case over the liability of cities when
municipal workers are killed or in-
jured on the job.
The court's decision in the
Pennsylvania case cleared the way
for trial of a suit against Barbara
*Hafer, the state's auditor general.
Hafer, a Republican, was accused of
firing 18 Democratic employees for
political reasons.
The workers sued, alleging they
were fired based on unsubstantiated
charges that they had "bought jobs"
in the auditor general's office.
Hafer was elected to her post in
1988 after a campaign in which she
made the job-buying allegations.
* The employees said they were
dismissed after she took office
without any further investigation
of whether they paid to be hired or
promoted.

Police newsletter:

call

911
by Melissa Peei
Daily Crime Report

to end loud

less
ter

Armed robbery, murder, felo-
nious assault, heart attack, noisy
parties next door.
What do these five things have in
common? They are all reasons for
Ann Arbor residents to dial 911.
The most recent issue of Crime
Watch, the Ann Arbor Police De-
partment's (AAPD) quarterly
community newsletter, urges citi-
zens bothered by party noise to call
911.
The message reads: "Noisy
Neighbors? Loud Parties? Blaring
Radios, Stereos, T.V.'s? You do have
recourse - in most cases 24 hours a
day! Don't sit in your home irritated
by other people's noise, obnoxious
behavior, or inconsiderate uses of
radios, stereos or T.V.'s. Do call
911!"
Although most University stu-
dents agree that Ann Arbor resi-
dents deserve some decent hours of
sleep - even on weekend nights -
they feel that the police's adver-
tisement of 911 is drastic.
"911 is for emergencies. 911 is
crowded enough as it is. In my opin-

ion, a noisy party is not an emer-
gency," said Engineering junior
Mario Ortega, a member of Phi
Kappa Tau fraternity.
Ortega added that his fraternity
and some of his friends have received
noise violations for parties this fall.
First-offense noise violations are
punishable by a maximum fine of
$500.
"Evidently people have been able
to file complaints with the police in
the past without using 911. I don't
know why the police would possi-
bly encourage the citizens of Ann

parties,
police service of any kind, whether'
they need emergency medical, if they
see a crime in progress, if they hear a
barking dog, or if they are bothered
by party noise. 911 is just the num-
ber to get in touch with Ann Arbor
police," he said.
He added that most areas of the
city which receive the newsletter
are principally comprised of single
family homes and few students.
But as the police continue to
monitor student parties, some stu
dents are beginning to see the need"
for the police crackdown.

'911 is just the number to get in touch with
the Ann Arbor police'
- Jerry Wrighf
Ann Arbor Police Department
Arbor to file complaints. If they are Natural Resources sophomore,
that bothered, they will just call," Dan Riseman, a member of Alpha
he said. Epsilon Pi fraternity said,
But Jerry Wright, director of the "Everyone has a right to peace and
AAPD's crime prevention unit, said
that in Ann Arbor 911 is not quiet. If a party goes overboard on
strictly for emergencies. loud music, people who are dis-
"If Ann Arbor residents need turbed should call the police."
MON

BRIAN CANTONI/Daly
Work detail
Engineering senior Ondrea Charles cleans a salad dressing container in
the Betsey Barbour kitchen.

Grant to upgrade curriculum

by Robin Litwin
Students will be able to study
geology and astronomy in small
class settings as a result of a
$58,000 grant to the University Ge-
ological Science Department.
The grant was given to the de-
partment by the National Science
Foundation, a federal agency con-
cerned with the advancement of sci-
entific research, and will fund the
establishment of 25 new courses in
the geology and astronomy
departments.
The department applied for the
grant one year ago and has received
funding which will subsidize three
new classes scheduled for next
semester. The department will have
to reapply next summer in order to
obtain the funding necessary for im-
plementing all 25 classes. Geology

chair Rob Van der Voo said the de-
partment eventually hopes to make
the classes permanent parts of the
geology curriculum.
In contrast to typically large
geology and astronomy classes, the
new courses will be smaller and de-
signed to give students the chance to
question freely and participate ac-
tively in discussion. The classes
will be limited to around 20 stu-
dents each, and will be geared to
first-year students, Van der Voo
said.
The smaller class setting will
also allow professors the option of
including a writing requirement, a
component currently lacking in
larger lecture classes, Van der Voo
added.

Additionally, the material cov-
ered in the classes will not be an
overview of general geological ma-
terial, but rather an in-depth study
of earth science issues that are rele-
vant to students' lives.
"Science suffers in a large class-
room," Van der Voo said. "Students
often need more explanation than
the instructor thinks."
Van der Voo said he feels that
undergraduates need more contact
with professors. He added that
smaller class size would increase
this interaction.
The first three classes in the se-
ries will cover topics including
planetary systems, climate change,
and ocean resources.

V
0

really needtoescape Ann
o Arbor during the upcoming .
vacations! Where can I go
that will help me with my
traveplan?

\

Travel-Planning Services,
Give this poor student a hand
with his travel plans by telling
him about your business with an
advertisment on The Michigan
Daily's TRAVEL PAGE!
" Publication date: Nov. 15
" Deadline date: Nov. 8
CALL 764-0554 TODAY!

i

V

THE LIST
What's happening in Ann Arbor today

Meetings
U-M Baha'i Club, weekly mtg. Stock-
well, Rosa Parks Lounge, 8-9:30.
Korean Student Association, weekly
mtg. Union, 3rd floor, 5:30.
Puhlic Interest Research Group in
M ich igan, weekly mtg. 4109 Union,
9:30.
Recycle U-M, weekly mtg. Dana Bldg,
Student Lounge, 7 p.m.
Students Concerned About Animal
Rights, weekly mtg. Dominick's, 9 p.m.
MSA Environmental Commission,
weekly mtg. Dominick's, 5 p.m.
Kaleidoscope, undergrad art history
club. basement of Tappan Hall, 4:15.
Latin American Solidarity
C(ormmittee, weekly mtg. Union,
Welker Rm, 8 p.m.
Lorastrian Association of Michigan.
League lobby, 8 p.m.
International Program in Germany,
informational mtg. 451 Mason, 5 p.m.
Speakers
"The End of the Empire: Current
Crisis in the Caucasus," panel dis-
cussion. 200 Lane Hall, 4-6.
"Georgia: Apocalypse Now," Dr.
Stephen Jones, Mt. Holyoke College.
Lane Hall Commons, noon.
"Surface Enhanced Raman,"
Ricardo Aroca, University of Windsor.
1650 Chem, 4 p.m.
"New Chiral Reagents for
Asymmetric Synthesis," Prof.
'Manfred Braun, University of
:Dusseldorf. 1640 Chem Bldg, 4 p.m.
"Conditional Inference: Re-assessing
the P-Value," Prof. Michael
:Brimacombe. 451 Mason, 4 p.m.
"A Talk on Speech Perception," Pam
.Heddor. 1092 Frieze, 4:30.
"Technology and the Gulf War,"
'Raymond Tanter, and "Technology of
War in the 20th Century," Thomas
Collier. 1014 Dow, 3:30-5.
"l)evelopment Issues in Eastern
Lurope and the Baltics! The Peace
Corps Response," David Thomas,
Peace Corps associate director-desig-
nate. Rackham Amphitheater, 8 p.m.
"The Transition From a Planned to
a Market Economy: Lessons from
'India," Dr. S. Abid Hussain, ambas-
sador of India to the United States.

Commons, 4 p.m.
Lyn St. James, Trans Am driver.
Society of Automotive Engineers mtg.
Chrysler Aud, 6 p.m.
Furthermore
Safewalk, night-time safety walking
service. Sun-Thur, 8 p.m.-1:20 a.m.
and Fri. and Sat. 8 p.m. - 11:30 p.m.
Stop by 102 UGLi or call 936-1000.
Extended hours are 1 a.m. -3 a.m. at
the Angell Hall Computing Center or
call 763-4246.
Northwalk, North Campus safety
walking service. Sun-Thur 8 p.m.-1:30
a.m. and Fri. and Sat. 8 p.m.-11:30
p.m. Stop by 2333 Bursley or call 763-
WALK.
U-M Ninjitsu Club, Wednesday prac-
tice. IM Bldg, wrestling rm, 7:30-9.
U-M Women's Lacrosse Club,
Wednesday practice. Oosterbaan Field
House, 9-10:30.
E C1B Peer Writing Tutors. An-
gell/MasonComputing Center, 7-11.
Ultimate Frisbee Club. Mitchell
Field, 7-9.
U-I Shorin-Ryu Karate-Do Club,
Wednesday workout. CCRB Martial
Arts Rm, 8-9.
U-M Taekwondo Club, Wednesday
workout. CCRB Martial Arts Rm,
6:30-8 p.m.
Guild House Beans and Rice Dinner.
802 Monroe, 6-7.
Support Group for those ages 17-25
whose parent has died. Gabriel
Richard Center at Saint Mary's
Chapel, 7-8:30.
"Thinking About Majoring in
English?" Talk to English Advisor
Derek Green every Wednesday. Haven
7th floor lounge, 4-5.
The Yawp Literary Magazine, sub-
missions accepted. 7629 Haven.
Self Defense Workshop. League,
Henderson Rm, 7 p.m.
"Wings of Desire," film. Max Kade
German House, 603 Oxford Rd, 8 p.m.
Jewish Peace Lobby, brown bag dis-
cussion on the Middle East. Rackham,
4th floor, noon.
Career Planning and Placement.
Marketing Your Liberal Arts Degree.
CP&P Program Rm, 4:10-5.
The Medical School Application
Process. CP&P Conference Rm, 5:10-6.

Billionaire
newspaper
publisher
found dead
MADRID, Spain (AP) -
Robert Maxwell, the flamboyant
billionaire who built a global
newspaper and communications em-
pire, was found dead yesterday in
waters off the Canary Islands, offi-
cials said. He apparently fell from
his luxury yacht.
The 68-year-old publisher disap-
peared shortly after being accused
by an investigative journalist of
having close links with the Israeli
secret service Mossad.
Now questions emerge about the
future of Maxwell's debt-burdened
holdings, which he ruled with a
fierce profit-driven philosophy.
Before the announcement of
Maxwell's disappearance, Max-
well Communications and its affil-
iate, Mirror Group Newspapers
PLC, asked the London Stock
Exchange to suspend trading in their
shares.
The boards of Maxwell's com-
panies named Maxwell's two sons
as their acting chairs.

ROUNDTRIP
NEW YORK $198
LA/SAN FRAN $280
LONDON $440
PRAGUE $610
GUATEMALA CITY_$542
TOKYO $741
HONG KONG $855
BANGKOK $949
SYDNEY $1337
* FLIGHTS WORLDWIDE
" LOW COST ONE-WAY FARES
AVAILABLE
" REFUNDABLE FLEXIBLE
CHANGEABLE
" EURAIL/HOSTEL PASSES, ID CARDS
" SOME RESTRICTIONS MAY APPLY
" CALL FOR FREE BROCHURE
" DEPARTS CHICAGO
" FARESSUBJECT TO CHANGE
WITHOUT NOTICE
" VALID MONDAYTHURSDAY
" WEEKEND SURCHARGES MAY
APPLY
12 **bFFICESWOR LDWIDE
1-800-777-0112
1-212-986-9470

Prqfessionaf
A Career Symposium for
Gratduatte Students
Saturday, November 9, 1991 * 8:15 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.
FouRTH FLOOR, RACKHAM
Registration Information
To assure a space in your preferred sessions
take advantage of
extended pre-registraztion through
Thursday, November 7,1991
On-site registration will begin at'8:15 a.m., November 9
Check your department or Career Planning and Placement
for registration materials.

,w
,

For more information and registration
materials contact:
career Planning & Placement
3200 Student Activities Building
(313) 764-7460

Sponsors:
Cr Planning andPlacement
Rackham Student Government
and the Hora H. Rackham
School of Graduate Studies

48 E. 11th St.
New York
NY 10003

STA TRAVEL

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LAST CALL FOR
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It's not a cut version. It's the same number of hours of live instruction--
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December 7, 1991 LSAT
CLASS BEGINS NOV. 11TH!
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