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November 06, 1991 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1991-11-06

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01

Page 2-The Michigan Daily- Wednesday, November 6, 1991

TENSIONS
Continued from page 1
Sharpton.
"Obviously he (the Black friend)
felt the fliers contained informa-
tion about Blacks that he saw as un-
fair," Kohane said. "He wanted to
know if the Jewish community re-
ally felt the way the fliers read," he
said.
Yet Kohane said the same holds
true for Jews. "On the other hand,
Jews are concerned about being
stereotyped and pigeonholed by
people like Sharpton, who they feel
evokes images of Jewish people that
are classically unflattering and de-
meaning," he added.

RC sophomore Tobias Zimmer-
man, who is both Black and Jewish,
said divisions on campus reflect di-
visions in society, which are at least
partly based on economic differ-
ences.
"I think the biggest complaints
that Al Sharpton and his movement,
and Blacks in general have, is that
whether or not they're legally
equal, they're not financially or
economically equal with the rest of
America," he said.
"The problem is that stereotypi-
cally, Jews are rich. The stereotype
is that Jews have money and don't
want to share it."
Despite the differing interpreta-
tions of the problems between

Blacks and Jews, there is a consensus
on the way to solve - or at least
move towards solving - the prob-
lem. This involves establishing a di-
alogue between the groups.
Zimmerman sees the need for a
"gripe session," between Blacks and
Jews. "I think you need forums
where Jewish people and Black peo-
ple can sit down and straighten
things out," he said.
"I think the Jews need to realize
that Blacks don't hate them just be-
cause they're Jewish, and Blacks
need to realize that Jews don't have
all the money," he added.
Kohane agreed. "I think it would
not be a bad idea for Blacks and
whites to get together over the

Sharpton visit and discuss what
happened, for there to be a regular
forum where there is a topic over
which Blacks and whites can have an
ongoing discussion," he said.
"I always stress learning about
our history," Smith said. "I think
there is a history between African
Americans and Jews that most of us
don't know about," he said.
BLSA Chair Randon, like Zim-
merman and Kohane, called for a di-
alogue. "I think we need a sincere,
honest discussion in the University
community between Jewish groups
and Black groups. We need to work
together for solutions to help all of
us instead of working for our indi-
vidual gains."

IOWA
Continued from page 1
loss to explain what could have
caused Lu to snap like he did.
"There was probably a lot of
pent up anger and frustration, but it
is impossible to tell when someone
commits a crime of this magni-
tude," said junior Richard Frye.
"There is stress in the Physics
Department, but not so much that it
would move someone to do that.
There is stress in every aspect of
life," said Physics TA David
Neveel.
The general feeling on campus is
that although Friday's events are a
terrible tragedy, the community

will recover, many students said.
"It has made everyone stop and
reevaluate their own lives. It made
me change my own life and stop
procrastinating," Gaudet said.
Constant said she saw students
on campus reevaluating the way
they handle stress and pressure in
both their academic and social lives.
"People are more aware of not just
academic stress, but what can happen
when you let things go to far," she
said.
Neveel noted that the University
community has developed a sense of
unity as a result of the shooting.
- Daily staff reporter Andrew
Levy contributed to this story

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If you have a strong background in adver-
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The Michigan Daily's display advertising staff
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Stop by:
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THE TRAINED VOLUNTEER CORPS, sponsored by a
grant from the W.J. KELLOGG FOUNDATION and the
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, is seeking qualified
undergraduate students to provide the leadership and
foundation to four new student organizations beginning
in January, 1992. Officers are sought for:
THE HOMELESS PROJECT
THE YOUTH AT RISK PROJECT
THE ELDERLY PROJECT
THE ADULT LITERACY PROJECT
Officers for each project will be responsible for:
* Management of a substantial budget for program and
promotions.
* Organization and development of field service projects.
* Supervision of all project committees.
* Organizational planning and membership recruitment.

ELECTIONS
Continued from page 1
utive term.
Republican state legislator
George Allen was elected to a
House seat in Virginia. He led
Democrat Kay Slaughter, 61 percent
to 35 percent, with 35 percent of the
votes tallied. Allen replaces retir-
ing Republican D. French Slaughter,
Kay Slaughter's cousin.
In the other House race on the
ballot, Democrat Lucien Blackwell
won a four-way race to succeed for-
mer Rep. William Gray III in
Philadelphia.
Democrat Ed Rendell was
elected mayor of Philadelphia, suc-

ceeding outgoing W. Wilson Goode.
In Indianapolis, former prosecu-
tor Stephen Goldsmith, a
Republican, swept to victory in his
race to succeed outgoing four-term
Mayor William Hudnut III.
Kurt Schmoke won a second term
as Baltimore's mayor. Other big-
city mayors seeking new terms in-
cluded Boston's Ray Flynn, who led
handsomely in early returns, and San
Francisco's Art Agnos.
Washington D.C. voters voted
overwhelmingly to make manufac-
turers and sellers of certain assault
weapons liable for damage caused by
their use. The city struggles perpet-
ually with violent crime.

JOHNSON
Continued from page 1
ing efforts in Washington, D.C.
These responsibilities will shift to
Harrison's office.
Harrison said his office will
now have a more national focus.
"The full scale of focus will be on
national things since we already do
national relations and public
affairs."
Robert Forman, executive direc-
tor of the University Alumni
Association said Johnson's position

was created especially for him.
"This is a position that we've cre-
ated to accommodate the fact that
we are able to have a person of his
quality with us," Forman said.
Forman said Johnson, the
Alumni Association's only senior
consultant, will be a liaison with
various University alumni organi-
zations such as the Hispanic alumni
group and the Korean alumni group.
"He has extraordinary interper-
sonal skills. His ability to deal
with senior leadership... will be
critical," Forman added.

To apply, submit resume and cover letter:
Margaret Elias
Trained Volunteer Corps
2205 Michigan Union
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1349
Application deadline is November 22, 1991.

Trained Volunteer Corps

Care
that's
there
in your neighborhood.

i

"
Q "" ,.,, .
, .

MSA
Continued from page 1
budget were bad enough," Lewis
said.
The budgets of SLS and the Ann
Arbor Tenants Union is determined
by the assembly.
However, the sponsor of the res-
olution, Engineering Rep. Brian
Kight, said tonight that SLS is
already subject to the -political
whims of the assembly.
"They already have to deal with
our politics. That's part of their re-
lation with the assembly," he said.
"I don't think we should hold the
concerns of the assembly hostage."
Some members of the assembly
added that students should be al-
lowed to voice their opinions on
these issues.
LSA Rep. Brett White argued
that this was an opportunity for di-
rect democracy and that mandatory
student approval would only induce
MSA representatives to work
harder.
"I'm really amazed at the arro-
gance and disregard of the assembly
to the constituents," he said. "They
have every right to vote on it."
He added that the assembly
could not be sure of the student vote
and that it might even be positive
"if people got off their butts and do
something instead of yelling at each
other on Tuesday nights."
However, Engineering Rep. John

Vanderberg said that if this pro-
posal passed, students would refuse
the- money and MSA's budget
would dwindle due to inflation.
"That'll freeze our budget.0
We'll be stuck with the same bud-
get year after year," he said. "We're
going to be able to do less and less
with that money. We're going to
end up giving ourselves the shaft if
we're going to do this."
White sponsored the second res-
olution which would have consoli-
dated the Women's Issues,
Academic Affairs, Peace and Justice,
Student Rights, and Health Issues
committees into one Student Issues
and Environmental Issues commis-
sion.
He said-that this conglomeration
of committees would streamline
and increase the efficiency of the as-
sembly by making it prioritize
issues.
Although Rackham Rep. Sean
Herlihy argued that White may not
be using this proposal to further a
political agenda, he indicated other
representatives supported the reso-
lution as a result of "political op-
position to the work those commis-
sion have been doing."
Law Rep. Michael Warren ar-
gued that assembly members should
vote for the resolution to allow for
student self-determination and
democracy. He said, "We've already
seen one major betrayal to the stu-
dent tonight, let's not make two."

- :.: :.= i;..: :

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4 e rirf anr&iI
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Managing Editor
News Editors
Opinion Editor
Associate Editor
Editorial Assistants
Weekend Editor
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Photo Editor

Andrew Gottesman Managing Sports Editor
Josh Mitnick SportsEditors
Philip Cohen, Christine
Kloostra, Donna Woodwell, Arts Editors
Sarah Schweitzer Books
Stephen Henderson Film
Katie Sanders Fine Arts
Geoff Earle, Amitava Mazumdar Music
Gil Renberg Theater
Jesse Walker List Editor
Kenneth J. Smoller

Matt Rennie
Theodore Cox, Phil Green, John Niyo
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News: Lynne Cohn, Ben Ded, Lauren Dermer, Henry Gddblatt, Andrew Levy, Travis McReynolds, Josh Meckler, Uju Oraka,
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Photo: Brian Cantoni, Anthony M. Crol, Jennifer Dunatz, Kristoffer Gillette, Michelle Guy, Doug Kanter, Heather Lowman,
Sharon Musher, Suzie Paley.
Weekend: Usa Bean, Jonathan Chait, Craig Linn, Dan Poux, Malt Pulliam.

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