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November 04, 1991 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1991-11-04

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Page 2-The Michigan Daily- Monday, November 4, 1991

NOMINATION
Continued from page 1
versity. "I think that it is a happy
outcome. the other two finalists
were men. We were not looking
specifically for a woman," she said.
At WSU, Anderson is responsi-
ble for overseeing a student services
department that includes a $35 mil-
lion budget and 475 faculty
members.
Moreover, the department is re-
sponsible for services including
housing, student activities, counsel-
ing, minority affairs. Anderson also
oversees admissions and financial
aid at WSU - both of which are
under separate offices at the
University.
Anderson will take over a de-
partment at the University that is
responsible for 1,100 employees and
a budget which exceeds $80 million.
Anderson has been at WSU since
1986. Previously, she held student
services positions at Case Western
Reserve University, the University
of Arkansas and the University of
Maine.

Duderstadt speaks
at all-class reunion
of Black graduates

01

by Ben Deci
Daily Staff Reporter
The Michigan Mandate's effect
at the University has been demon-
strated by the highest minority en-
rollment ever, University President
James Duderstadt said at the All-
Class Reunion of Black Graduates
Friday.
But alumni say more still needs
to be done.
The Black Alumni Association
chose the Mandate, which is an ef-
fort on the part of the University to
increase minority enrollment and
success, as a theme for the reunion
and a priority for the upcoming year.
Duderstadt said minorityen-
rollment, at 26 percent, is the high-
est it has been since 1976. He
pointed to this as a preliminary ef-
fect of the Michigan Mandate.
DeiadracDowns, education chair
of the Black Alumni Association,
said more needs to be done. "We
take too long to notify students, and
_ we don't have enough minority
scholarship money available. By the
time we make an offer to a student,
they've already got a better one
from somewhere else," she said.
Duderstadt also said the
- University's retention rate of mi-
nority students is two out of three.
"In terms of other universities in
the Midwest, we are the leader in
this area," he said.
"That figure is still too low,"
Downs said. "We need to make sure
that students get the support they
need to stay at school."

Downs pointed to several pro-
grams developed by the Black
Alumni Association designed to
give the Michigan Mandate a boost.
"The Martin Luther King
Scholarship Program we offer pro-
vides money for minority stu-
dents," she said. "Currently we of-
fer $1,000 to 29 incoming freshmen
a year. It's a one-year program now,
but we hope to make it continuing."

01

On tour HEATHER LOWMAN/D
LSA junior Barat Dickman shows off the Angell Hall computing center yesterday to his parents, Irwin and
Reva, who came to Ann Arbor from New Jersey.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Downs said the association is
also concerned with increasing the
minority retention level. "We offer
a mentor program that provides
wisdom for minority students from
people who have been there.
However, we need more volun-
teers," Downs said.
She added that by making the
Mandate a focus of the All-Class
Black Reunion, the association
hoped to raise awareness of their
need for volunteers.
Tom Richardson, the Black
Alumni Association's student liai-
son, coordinates the association's
programs and directs students to the
resources available to them.
Richardson said there are many
support systems for minority stu-
dents. "They only have to know
where to look. That is where the
Black Alumni Association can
help," he said.
Downs said, "We really want
minority students to know that
they can go to the Black Alumni
Association for support. We are
there and available."

Holday
GEftMudas

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SHOOTING
Continued from page 1
Police recovered a .38-caliber re-
volver near the assailant.
The University of Iowa knows
little about Lu, except that he was
from the People's Republic of
China and "seemed to be a loner,"
Fritz said.
"The student who was killed
was very active and well-known, as
opposed to the gunman, who was
less-known," she said..
Fritz said the shootings have left
the university community
devastated.
"The mood is one of complete
shock and grief. The crime rate in
Iowa City is low - things like this
just don't happen here," she said.
The last two shootings occurred
in Jessup Hall, about three blocks
away from the physics building.
Some students said they feel that
stronger campus security could have
prevented the second set of shoot-
ings. The University of Iowa's cam-
MADRID
Continued from page 1
the hallways outside the meeting
room during breaks, drinking coffee
together and chatting, Israeli dele-
gates said. Palestinian Elias Freij,
the mayor of Bethlehem, said "there
were many light moments," includ-
ing a few jokes.
As if to underscore the high
stakes, however, PLO chief Yasser
Arafat said in Tunis "If the negotia-

pus police are not an armed force.
"I think the campus security here
is a little group that arrests drunk
people on the weekends," said Iowa
junior Lance Van Houten. "They are
not much of a preventive force for
something like this.

RELEASE DATES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE
AT THE BEST PRICE IN TOWN

.

'The shootings were
... not random'
- Joaneen Fritz
U. of!1. spokesperson
"It happened, but it seems so iso-
lated. That guy was obviously crazy.
That award must have been his
whole life," he added.
Iowa sophomore Tony Potter
said he does not believe students
feel less safe on campus now.
"A lot of us are trying to justify
it as a one-time thing," Potter said.
Fritz said the university has can-
celled today's classes and will pro-
vide counseling for those affected
by the shootings. The university is
also planning a memorial for the
victims.
tions do not lead to 'a positive out-
come, we will continue the jihad,"
or holy war. He added that the inte-
fadeh, the Palestinian uprising
against Israeli rule in the occupied
lands, would "go on, wave after
wave."
However, Bassam Abu Sharif,
political adviser to Arafat, called
the agreement to hold further talks
"good news" and expressed hope
they would be in Washington or
Moscow.

yr ,'* t.

the copy center

The RAND
Graduate School (RGS)
RGS invites applications for its doctoral degree
program in Public Policy Analysis. Deadline for
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the Western Association of Schools and Colleges.
Curriculum consists of rigorous multidisciplinary
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equivalent to doctoral fellowships. Fellowships are
also available for applicants with special interests
in education of Soviet studies. A master's degree,
or equivalent post-bachelor's degree training and
experience, is required for admission.
A representative of RGS will be at Career Planning
and Placement Center, Student Activities Building,
on Thursday, November 7,1991.

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THEC ONSORTIUM OF
FRANCE 'S FIVE LEADING
GRANDES ECOLES
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is seeking to recruit June '92
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Students interested in finding out
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programs they offer, are encouraged
to attend the MBA and Graduate

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