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November 04, 1991 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1991-11-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TODAY
More clouds and cold;
High: 31, Low: 17.
TOMORROW
A little warmer;
High: 40, Low: 21.

One hundred and one years of editorial freedom

Women's soccer
wins Big Ten title.
See SPORTSMonday.

,Vol. CI, No. 26

Ann Arbor, Michigan - Monday, November 4, 1991

copy{rgnt V1991
Th Michigan ladly

'U' picks Anderson for
student services position
WSU administrator to begin V.P. job in January

by Henry Goldblatt
Daily Administration Reporter
Maureen Anderson, vice provost for
Student Affairs at Washington State Uni-
versity, has been nominated to become the
new vice president for Student Services,
the University announced Friday.
Anderson, who will take over the posi-
tion in January if her nomination is ap-
proved by the University Board of Re-
gents, said one of her first priorities is to
meet with a broad range of University stu-
dents and to make the student services of-
fice accessible to students.
"I'd like to change most students' feel-
ing that Student Services is an inaccessible
place to come," she said. "It is unrealistic
to assume that you can sit in an office and
students will come to you."
Anderson, whose term would last five
years, said she intends to acquaint herself
with the University by attending classes
and holding open meetings for University
students, as well as eating meals in resi-
dence halls, fraternities and sororities.
Moreover, she added that she might live
in a residence hall for a few weeks -
something she did when she first came to
WSU, which she said worked well.
"Part of what everyone needs to under-
stand is services provided to students are
not just a luxury, they are a necessity to
what keeps students in school," Anderson
said.

Anderson said she left WSU because
many of the colleagues she worked with
had begun to leave also. Moreover, she said
her timing was influenced by the opening
of student services positions at the Uni-
versity and at Stanford University.
"The provost who I came here to work
under left. The team he pulled together is
starting to break apart and go," she said. "I
tend to affiliate myself with people more
than positions."
Members of the University administra-
tion and students involved in the inter-
viewing part of the process said they were
pleased with the selection.
"I liked her. She was the top choice of
the candidates that I saw. Of the candidates
before us I though that she was the most
forthcoming," said Julie Helling, a second-
year law student.
Anderson was selected from a pool of
more than 75 applicants. Earlier this
month, a group of 13 student leaders inter-
viewed the three finalists selected for the
position.
"She's seen student services on a variety
of types of campuses. She has lots of ideas
about innovative programs and new ap-
proaches," said Connie Cook, executive as-
sistant to the president.
Cook added that Anderson was the
unanimous choice of the nine-member
search committee formed in June to rec-
ommend a replacement for Mary Ann

Swain, interim vice president for Student
Services, who has held the position since
January 1990.
Cook said that although the search
committees was not looking specifically

Number one
Wide receiver Desmond Howard scores Michigan's first touchdown in the Wolverines'
42-0 victory over Purdue in Michigan Stadium Saturday afternoon.

Andersonra NIVly
for a woman, members were pleased a
woman was chosen. Anderson will become
the only female vice president at the Uni-
See NOMINATION, Page 2

Iowa student kills five, then
self over academic nomination

by Gwen Shaffer
Daily Higher Education Reporter

A former University of Iowa
student, apparently seeking revenge
for being overlooked for an aca-
demic award nomination, shot and
killed five people and critically
wounded another Friday night be-
fore fatally shooting himself.
The victims were five faculty

members and the student nominated
for the honor.
The police have discovered evi-
dence suggesting that the murders
were planned in advance, said
Joaneen Fritz, director of
University Relations at the Uni-
versity of Iowa.
"The shootings were against
very specific people," she said.

"They were not random."
The assailant was identified as
Gang Lu, who graduated with a doc-
torate in physics last May. ,
Shortly before 4 p.m. Friday, Lu
went to the physics building and
shot two professors and another
graduate student as they were meet-
ing in a conference room.
After these shootings, Lu went-

downstairs and shot another profes-
sor in his office, Fritz said.
The three professors have been
identified as Dwight Nicholson,
chair of the physics and astronomy
department, Christoph Goertz, an
astronomy and physics professor,
and Robert Smith, associate director
of the physics and astronomy
department.
All were members of Lu's dis-
sertation committee.
The student victim, Linhua Shan,
was the author of a dissertation that
was nominated for an award for
which Lu apparently felt he should
have received.
All three of the professors and
Shan died on the scene.
From there, Lu proceeded to the
Office of Academic Affairs where
he asked to speak with Anne Cleary,
the associate vice president for aca-
demic affairs.
As she stepped out of her office,
Lu shot her and her secretary, Miya
Rodolfo-Sioson, Fritz said.
Cleary died Saturday afternoon.
Rodolfo-Sioson was listed in criti-
cal condition last night.
Lu had filed grievances earlier
with the Office of Academic
Affairs concerning his dissertation,
Fritz said.
Police have found five copies of a
letter Lu had written to his victims
and given to acquaintances to mail,
Fritz said. The letter laid out Lu's
grievances with the physics and aca-
demic affairs departments.
"The letters were sealed, ad-
dressed, and stamped. His actions
were very consistent with what was
in the letters," Fritz said.
Iowa City police found Lu alive
immediately following the shoot-
ings, but with fatal head wounds.
See SHOOTING, Page 2

These delegates are among those participating in the first Mideast
peace conference in two decades. From left: Jordanian Foreign Minister
Kamel Abu Jaber, Palestinian Dr. Haidar Abdul-Shafi, Israeli Prime
Minister Yitzhak Shamir, and Syrian Foreign Minister Farouk al-Sharaa.
Israel -=Palest in ian
direct negotiations
seen as positive step
MADRID, Spain (AP) - about when and where to hold
Israelis and Palestinians yester- substantive talks, "which it is
day held "good, businesslike" di- . hoped will take place soon."
rect talks - their first ever - Secretary of State James Baker
and pledged to try to move on to said the question of the site and
more substantive issues, such as time of the next round of talks is
Palestinian autonomy, within a still unanswered. But he told re-
few days. porters the peace conference
In another milestone, hard-line marked a "good beginning" to
Syria overcame hesitations and ending regional conflict.
opened its one-on-one meeting "There have been and, as I have
with Israel late last night - the said, there will be obstacles,"
first talks between the archfoes in Baker said. "They have not de-
43 years. A Lebanese delegation terred us until now and they will
also held separate talks with not."
Israel. After the Israeli-Palestinian
Following their nearly five- talks, the participants shook
hour session, the Israelis and a hands for photographers, and the
joint Palestinian-Jordanian dele- chief Israeli delegate, Eliakim
gation displayed an amiable spirit, Rubinstein, referred to his Arab
in contrast to a week of con- counterparts as "my friends
frontational speeches and snubs here." At one point he answered a
during last week's ceremonial question both in Arabic, with the
opening phase of the historic word "Inshallah," and in
Madrid talks. Hebrew, with the words
Still to be settled is where the "Mirtzeh Hashem" - both
substantive negotiations will be meaning "God willing."
held. In a joint statement, the two The participants mingled in
sides said they would consult See MADRID, Page 2

A campus security officers checks the hallway outside the sealed Office of Academic Affairs on the
University of Iowa campus Saturday, where two women were shot Friday afternoon.

Students announce candidacy for MSA fall '91 elections

by Purvi Shah
Daily MSA Reporter
Porty candidates are slated to

The two official parties running
this term are Conservative Coali-
tion (CC) and Progressive Party.

their own opinions."
The Progressive Party is com-
prised of new students in addition

"I'd like to run things a lot dif-
ferently," Smith said. "CC isn't
paying attention to the voice of the

has a tentative platform based on
five issues:
Student rights and empower-

current Environment Issues Com-
mission - a committee which the
assembly approved last week to

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