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September 19, 1991 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1991-09-19

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01

Page 2--The Michigan Daily-Thursday, September 19, 1991

DUDERSTADT
Continued from page 1
1984 by former University
President Harold Shapiro, is a suffi-
cient means of prohibiting discrimi-
nation on the basis of sexual orien-
tation and therefore makes the by-
law change unnecessary.
"I do not believe that we've
heard at this time persuasive argu-
ments to change the regents' by-
law," Duderstadt said.
He also said bylaw 14.06 is an af-
firmative action bylaw and since the
federal government does not em-
ploy affirmative action in cases of
sexual orientation, the bylaw can-
not address this issue.
"We do have a very firm policy
that prevents discrimination and
those are just as strong as regental
bylaws," he said. "Bylaws refer to
groups which affirmative action
pertains to in the law ... The actual
language is drawn from federal
statutes," he added.
When asked if the University has
an affirmative action policy for
handicapped people and Vietnam

veterans, Duderstadt said the
University does employ an affirma-
tive action policy for handicapped
people, but did not answer questions
regarding affirmative action for
Vietnam veterans.
Furthermore, Duderstadt said a
bylaw change would not necessarily
mean ROTC would be removed
from campus.
He said it would be unfair to re-
move ROTC from campus because
many students depend on the mili-
tary service as a way of financing
their education.
"I don't think we should penal-
ize students who need these oppor-
tunities just to make a statement,"
Duderstadt said.
Duderstadt said changes in the
ROTC policy can best be achieved by
lobbying in Washington, D.C.,
rather than banning the group from
campus.
However, Duderstadt added that
he will take the recommendations in
the report seriously.
"It could be that this report
will stimulate us to look at some of
these issues," he said.

Weiner arranges
deal to plead

guilty to
DETROIT (AP) - Former
Deputy Police Chief Kenneth
Weiner will plead guilty to federal
conspiracy and tax charges in an
agreement with prosecutors, said
government attorneys and Weiner
yesterday.
Weiner, a former business part-
ner of Mayor Coleman Young, also
had been accused of embezzling $1.3
million from the police department.
In a news release, U.S. Attorney
Stephen Markman said Weiner
would plead guilty to conspiracy
and tax charges. He will face up to
37 months in prison, the maximum
for the charges under federal guide-
lines, Markman said.
The statement said the agreement
does not include any provisions for
Weiner to testify against former
Police Chief William Hart, who is
also indicted on embezzlement
charges.
"From our perspective, this is in
Mr. Weiner's best interest," said his
attorney, Edward Wishnow of

charges
Southfield. "This should be the last
of his legal troubles."
Weiner is already serving a 10-
year federal sentence for defrauding
investors in a pyramid scheme. He is
also serving nine months on an Oak-
land County state charge of stealing
a car in a botched escape attempt
while meeting lawyers.
Markman and Wishnow said the
plea agreement had yet to be entered
before U.S. District Judge Paul
Gadola. Wishnow said a court date
had not been set for entering the
plea.
Weiner was charged in February
with embezzling $1.3 million from
a fund earmarked for undercover op-
erations such as payments to drug
informants. He faced up to 10 years
in prison if convicted of embezzle-
ment.
Hart faces trial Jan. 6, also on
charges of embezzling more than $1
million.

won't move," he added.
Other military sources at the
Continued from page 1 Pentagon said the wing put on alert
is located at Shaw Air Force Base,
"We're ready to move if so or- S.C. That is the home of the 9th Air
dered," but the orders had not yet Force commanded, by Lt. Gen.
come down, said a senior Air Force Charles Horner, who led the air
officer. "My feeling is that we war during Operation Desert Storm.
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Confirmation support A ht
Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas greets his eighth grade
teacher, Sister Virgilius Reidy, as she arrived on Capitol Hill Monday for
Thomas' fifth and final day of testimony before the Senate Judiciary
Committee.

DEBATE
Continued from page 1
hopefully we can finish this soon,"
Brown said.
Keith Molin, associate vice pres-
ident for the University's
'Government Relations, agrees with
Schwarz about tuition caps.
"I don't believe that you should
make policies for tuition limits in
an appropriations bill. That should
be left to individual universities to
decide," Molin said.
Molin said the University will
probably not receive money for pri-
vately-funded buildings.
"Right now the way the facility
funding is worded is that any pri-

vately-funded building will not re-
ceive money from the state. Only
publicly-funded buildings will re-

Alaina Campbell, the legislative
director of the Michigan Collegiate
Coalition, a student lobbying orga-

'Once we finish the report and agree on the
bill, we will almost guarantee passage of it. I
can't remember a time when the legislature
failed to pass a bill which the committee,
recommended'
- John Schwarz
State senator (R-Battle Creek)

"There has been a lot of politick-
ing going on. The Republicans feel
like the Democrats are using the is-
sue of tuition caps as a political
ploy," Campbell said.
Campbell predicts Hood will
back down on the tuition caps issue.
"Schwarz will not compromise.
I have a feeling that Hood will have
to back down. This is a big issue po-
litically, and one which will proba-
bly be the biggest obstacle in the
successful completion of the higher
education budget," Campbell said.
Campbell also said parents need
to be more involved in the debate
over tuition.
"The legislators listen more to
parents than to students. We can put
more pressure on the government if
more parents are involved," she said.
sory Committee was formed last
fall as a review board for the actions
of the newly-deputized campus po-
lice force.
Tate was turned over to the Ann
Arbor Police Department follow-
ing his arrest. Bail was set at $3,500
and his preliminary examination is
scheduled for next Wednesday.
- Daily Staff Reporter Andrew
Levy contributed to this.report.

Mon Labatts Pitchers: $5.00
Tue Bud Light Pitchers: $3.50
Wed Pint Night: 75ยข off pints
Thu Long Island Iced Tea: $3.25
Fri Happy Hour 'til 9:00 in the
Underground. $1.00 off all
drinks, pints, wine.
RESTARANT ND PU
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ceive state funds," he said. "That's
all right with us. Now all we have
to do is to get some publicly-funded
buildings."
ARREST
Continued from page 1
Tate's outstanding charges in-
clude delivery of marijuana/ posses-
sion with the intent to deliver, a
felony with a maximum penalty of
four years in prison. The two out-
standing misdemeanor charges are
driving with a suspended license and
offering a false identification to a

nization in Lansing, said she is not
surprised by the lack of agreement
among the committee about tuition
caps.
police officer.
The Department of Public Safety
is investigating the incident by re-
viewing reports from the officers
involved.
According to the statement, "the
reports and all ... information will
be furnished to the University
Safety and Security Advisory
Committee for their (sic) review."
The Safety and Security Advi-

DESKINS
Continued from page 1
Deskins said he will not play as
large a role in the new program as he
did before.
"I won't be taking as active a

role as I took in the past ... I told
them I would assist as best as I
could," he added.
However, Deskins, along with
the others involved in the new pro-
gram, hopes to effect the same
changes which resulted from the

-
.
L-
_- _

BYOB
Continued from page 1
enforced.
Goelkel said most Illinois stu-
dents did not have a problem with
the no-alcohol policy when it was
announced a year and a half ago.
However, the alcohol policy
changes at the University of Illinois
were implemented gradually.

"The administration had ex-
pressed concern about drinking
when someone got drunk and fell
out of an apartment window. The
IFC addressed the issue and decided
alcohol wouldn't be served after 1
a.m. But other members of the IFC
kept pushing until it was only al-
lowed at four functions per term,"
Goelkel said. "There's no move to
turn the campus completely dry.
"The people here who were used
to keg-parties were shocked, but the
new students didn't know any dif-
ferent. At first houses didn't be-
lieve we were going to no-kegs, so
there were a lot of misunderstand-

original one. W
"What this is, is some of the
folks from the 1970s trying to re-
verse the decline of the past decade
... this is a resurgence of what we've
done in the past," he said.
ings," he said.
Although kegs have been banned
from fraternity parties at the
University of Kentucky since 1989,
Fraternity Advisor Ron Lee said
such a measure does not go far
enough.
"We need to get away from a
full beer being the main part of the
party," Lee said.
Commers echoed these
sentiments.
"We would like to put the em-
phasis back on the reason fraterni-
ties are here - to promote social
values like duty to the community,"
he said.

.
" .
-- '.. .--+1
,-.. -

Today Only .. .
15 minutes
or FREE'
*15 minute guarantee applies to
Think Thick Thursday.
No additions, deletions or substitutions.
15 minute guarantee good
Thursday, Sept. 19, 1991
from 5pm to 1 am only. Limit 4.

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