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November 30, 1990 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1990-11-30

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The Michigan Daily-Friday, November 30, 1990- Page 3

New student
group spreads
..contemporary
Polsh culture
by Bonnie Bouman
There's more to Poland than kielbasa, polkas, and
Solidarity say AMerica-POLand members.
Katarzyna Zechenter, a Teaching Assistant for Polish
121, started the student group last month. Zechenter, a
,native of Poland, wanted to see a campus organization
vihich both informed people about Polish culture and
would be fun for students.
"This group is for students so it can't be conserva-
tive," Zechenter said. "It's a place to come and have fun
(for) people who want to learn something about
Poland."
& Christopher Dork, an LSA senior whose paternal
grandparents emigrated to the U.S. from Poland, said he
joined AMPOL hoping to get in touch with his roots.
"It's a personal interest of mine," he said.
AMPOL members said past Polish groups failed be-
cause they did not deal with contemporary issues.
"They catered to this stereotype of polkas, and they
fizzled out," said Basia Delawska-McQuaid. "With all
the issues brewing in Poland right now, our aim is
quite serious, and it can be done in a fun way."
"The education has to start out on a basic level,"
-agreed Delawska-McQuaid. "American images of eastern
countries might be Steve Martin saying 'We're wild and
crazy guys.' We want to get rid of that fuddy-duddy im-
age."
Dork thinks AMPOL will succeed. "I think we'll
expand," he said. "There's a lot of students who'll be in-
4erested in what's hapening in Eastern Bloc countries."
Organizing a Polish Film Festival next semester is
one of the group's main goals. "The image of Poland
*has been monolithic when there's actually a lot of vari-
ety," said member David McQuaid, a graduate student in
Polish History.
He said that the while University repeatedly shows
Polish movies by the same directors, such as Andrzej
Wajda, "our response is to get a wider taste of Polish
film. There's a lot of interesting stuff coming out of
Eastern Europe."
John Fenz, a senior in Eastern European studies,
admitted it was AMPOL's screenings that interested
him in the group. "I'm hoping to see some unusual
movies," he said.
Zechenter encourages AMPOL members to attend
today's presentation at 3:00 in the Rackham Building,
ASpotlight on Poland: An Immediate Analysis of the
Polish Presidential Election."
Thirty-five people attended AMPOL's premiere party
two weeks ago to sample free bigos and babka, hear
contemporary Polish music, and see Feliks Falk's film
t"Top Dog."
In the future AMPOL members hope to start a
Polish Happy Hour, bring in speakers on current politi-
cal events, and publicize a daily, electronic mail
newsletter.

Animal rights
movie sparks
student debate

by Stefanie Vines
Daily Research Reporter
Images of slaughtered animals
were the focus of an animal rights'
film shown last night by the Stu-
dents Concerned About Animal
Rights (SCAAR). An informal dis-
cussion followed the movie.
The two hour film said animals
are mistreated for research, agricul-
tural and fashion purposes.
"We just wanted to have some
kind of educational background on
animal rights. The purpose of the
film is to provoke some thought
about how we treat animals in our
society," said Christopher Coen, a
graduate student in architecture and
co-chair of SCAAR.
"We as humans tend not to think
of ourselves as animals, but we are.
Just because we are more advanced
mentally, doesn't excuse the way we
exploit animals for our own gain,"
Coen added.
"I'd like to see change," said LSA
senior Michael Leizerman, co-chair
with Coen. "Right now the areas
that will most likely change are fur
and cosmetic testing of animals.
These causes are more mainstream
and provoke more actions from the
public."
Leizerman added that the issue of
animals in research is the largest
problem at the University.
"Between 100,000 and 200,000
animals are used yearly. Our group
has tried to stop these animals from
being killed or hurt by going to the
committee meetings that oversee
these experiments. However, they
are closed to the public," Leizerman
said.
Among the facts the film cited
were:
the average American eats
twice as much protein as is
necessary per year
pigs often die as a result of
eating their own excrement
3 billion chickens, turkey, and

ducks are slaughtered each year in the
United States
more than 300 million
animals die in labs each year
a majority of lab animals are
used for commercial not medical
purposes
Many student were shocked by
the film.
"I came because I have a stong
interest in the issue of animal rights
and watching the film was hard. It's
something I'm concerned about,"
said LSA senior Jon Glaser.
"The movie was horrifying and
sickening, but vey powerful. I don't
understand why all of these problems
exist. Animal experimentation
should be reduced," LSA first-year
student Jennifer Gallard said.
Gallard added that one common
justification for inhumane treatment
of animals is that it is a necessary
evil to benefit humans. Another
problem Gallard identified was stu-
dent apathy.
"I tried to get people to come
with me tonight, but no one wanted
to go. That's sad, but I plan to take
action now," Gallard added.
One student said she not. only
wants to take action, but plans to
make animal activism her career.
"I want to devote my time to
professionally fighting for animal
rights through an organization. I
don't think I would go to the ex-
tremes some animal rights' activits
do like throwing fake blood, but
sometimes you need extreme acts to
yield results," said LSA sophomore
Holly McNulty.
Coen also disagreed with extrem-
ist tactics to reduce inhuman animal
treatment.
"Those are force tactics. You can
stop someone that way, but they
will just go and use animals as ob-
jects in some other way. That's not
the purpose," Coen said.

Snowball expressAo
Recent heavy snowfall in the Calgary area made for great sliding action as Dan Manship
(front), Keith Butt (middle), and Stacey Kootenay (rear) make the most of piled up snow behind
their school.
Amid protest, Bulgarian
gov t teeters on collapse

SOFIA, Bulgaria (AP) - Prime Minister
Andrei Lukanov's government of former
Communists appeared on the verge of col-
lapse Wednesday following angry street
protests and a threat by Bulgaria's largest
union to join a nationwide strike.
The official BTA news agency said an
agreement was struck under which Lukanov
would resign, but Lukanov called the report
premature.
Asked by reporters if he would quit,
Lukanov replied, "not now." He said he did
not know exactly when he would resign.
BTA had said President Zhelyu Zhelev
would appoint a caretaker Cabinet headed by
a premier who will be neither of the Socialist
Party, nor the Union of Democratic Forces
main opposition.
Pressure on the 52-year-old Socialist
premier increased hourly. He has been in-
creasingly blamed for the political paralysis
and economic chaos in this Balkan country
of nine million people.
Krastyo Petkov, chair of the main Con-
cederation of Independent Trade Unions,

said his organization would join a three-day-
old strike by the smaller, more radical Pod-
krepa union yesterday unless the political
stalemate was settled. His union had opposed
the strike.
Ognyan Kromov, the Confederation's
vice president, said it would start shutting
down heavy industry yesterday.

'870,000 workers were on
strike yesterday in 91 cities
throughout Bulgaria, includ-
ing 230,000 in Sofia'
Kromov said the union "insists on form-
ing a working Cabinet that would be a com-
petent and stable partner in negotiations."
Podkrepa said 870,000 workers were on
strike yesterday in 91 cities throughout Bul-
garia, including 230,000 in Sofia. The gov-
ernment put the total at 40,000.

?he Unversty pof niicin Chapter
of the
NAACP
prou~dly presents
The. Honorable

IHE LIST
What's happening in Ann Arbor today

i

Meetings
Friday
Feminist Women's Union,
weekly meeting. Call Cecelia Ober
(662-1958) for info. Union, 4:00.
U-M Chess Club, weekly meeting.
Call Tony Palmer (663-7147) for
info. Michigan League, 1:00.
Sunday
Learning Disability Society.
Union, Rm. 4306, 7:00.
Speakers
Friday
"Spotlight on Poland: An
Immediate Analysis of the
Polish Presidential Election,"
'discussion panel. Rackham Amphi-
theater, 3-5:00.
"The Political Cult of the
Dead: Reflections on the His-
tory of Monuments of War and
Civil War from the French Re-
volution to the Present Day,"
Prof. Reinhart Koselleck, speaker.
Rackham, W. Conf. Rm., 4-6:00.
"Superrigidity" and "Discrete
Groups of Affine Transform-
ations," Prof. A.G. Margulis of
IPPI, Moscow, speaker. Respect-
ively, 2235 Angell Hall, 2:30 and
3201 Angell Hall, 4:00.
"In Their Own Voices," a panel
discussion with HIV-positive women
from Ann Arbor and Detroit. League,
11:30-1:00.
Saturday
Forum on anti-South Asian
Discrimination, speakers will in-
clude a U.S. Rep. from Michigan and
the EEOC district comissioner.
Union, Kuenzel Rm., 2:00.
Sunday
"Racism, Activism and the

Urist, local play-wright and critic,
speaker. Call 769-0500 for info. Law
Quad, Lawyers' Club, 11:30.
Furthermore
Friday
Safewalk functions 8-1:30 Sun.-
Thurs., 8-11:30 Fri.-Sat. Call 936-
1000 or stop by 102 UGLi.
Northwalk functions 8-1:30 Sun.-
Thurs., 8-12:00 Fri.-Sat. Call 763-
WALK or stop by 2333 Bursley.
U of M Shorin-Ryu Karate-do
Club, Friday workout. Call 994-
3620 for info. CCRB Martial Arts
Rm., 8:00-9:00.
"Bring Back the Summer"
dance, sponsored by the Asian
American Association. Union,
Anderson Rm., 9-1:00 am.
German Family Christmas. Event
includes caroling and refresh-ments.
Call 994-4898 for info. Kempf
House, 312 S. Division, 7:15-9:30.
"Common Ties," an AIDS work-
shop with Danny Williams. Union,
Kuenzel Rm., 4:00.
Collaboration Technology
Suite Open House, sponsored by
the Cognitive Science and Machine
Intelligence Laboratory Dept. C-2420
Business Administration, 4-6:00.
Saturday
U of M Cycling Club Saturday
ride. Leaves from steps of Hill
Auditorium, 9:00 am.
"Allegro" Coffee House, enter-
tainment and refreshments, sponsored
by St. Mary's Student Parish. New-
man Center basement, corner of
Thompson and William, 8-11:00.
Southeastern Michigan Con-
ference for Youth Rights, a
conference sponsored by the Ann
Arbor Committee to Defend Abortion
and Reproductive Rights. Union,

GRAND OPENING
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UAC

SPECIAL

EVENT

Date:
Friday, November 30
Time:
8:00 p.m.
Place:
The University Club
Tickets:
$ 3.00
Awards:
1888,'89,,'90 Bay Area
e *IAward

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