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November 30, 1990 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1990-11-30

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Page 2-The Michigan Daily- Friday, November 30, 1990

Calvin and Hobbes

L~OW~ OJT TIL K
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by BillWatteso
I WOR ER HOIA A CRA99Y

Military analysts: Gulf war
in winter would favor U.S.

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by Judd Winick
WEIZ S'E~~ACK WITH A-
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CALLR NUM.BER 2 DO YOO
HAVE A GUe$TION?
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Fa. ABOUT SALAD

WASHINGTON (AP) - A win-
ter war with Iraq would benefit
American-led forces because their
modern weapons systems work bet-
ter in cooler weather and Iraqi forces
are more acclimated to the triple-
digit temperatures that will return in
April, U.S. military and private ana-
lysts say.
Still, the winter carries some pit-
falls - dramatic temperature
swings, high seas and sudden sand-
storms - and some advantages for
Saddam Hussein's troops. Those in-
clude the prospect that, if unleashed,
his chemical weapons could prove
more deadly because gases linger
longer in cooler air.
Military commanders and ana-
lysts agree that, from a combat per-
formance standpoint, fall and winter
are the optimal season for war in the
region.
"From a purely military point of
view it has its advantages," said
Piers Wood, a Vietnam combat

veteran who now is a lietuenant
colonel in the Army Reserve.
Wood heads the liberal think tank
Center for Defense Infromation,
which believes Bush should give
economic sanctions at least a year
before opting for a military strike.
But he acknowledged that "any
temperature or weather extreme is
going to degrade the performance of
your equipment, and our forces are
heavily dependant on electronics and
high-tech systems."
An Army officer recently iurned
from Saudi Arabia agreed tnc cooler
months gave the Americans a per-
sonpower and equipment advantage
but offered a caveat: "It's like a foot-
bal game. When it rains, it rains on
both sides of the field."
As the United States mounted its
buildup beginning in August, it was
soon apparent that some of its most
important and sensitive equipment

would not perform up to standard in
the Saudi summer, when tempera-.
tures can reach 130 degrees and
higher.
Rippling haze off the desert floor
limited the effectiveness of optical
devices and blurred pilots' vision; ra-
dio wires simplly melted; troops
quickly tired under the sun and faced
the prospect of dunning stifling
chemical weapon protective clithing
in the event of combat; engines'
overheated, cutting the time between
routine maintenance at a time when
spare parts were in short supply.
Now, the temperatures in the re-
gion might climb into the 80s but
more likely will average highs in the
mid-70s through the end of
February, creeping back into the 80s
and 90s in March and then over the
100 degree mark in April.

A ,
Tau Beta Pi, the National Engineering Honor Society, was founded to mark in a
fitting manner those who have conferred honor upon their Alma Mater by
distinguished scholarship and exemplary character as students in
engineering, or by their attainments as alumni in the field of engineering,
and to foster a spirit of liberal culture in engineering colleges.

Bush hesitant to reconvene House

WASHINGTON (AP) - A
former Navy secretary from the
Reagan administration joined the pa-
rade of former military officials at-
tacking President Bush's Persian
Gulf build up yesterday. Bush fo-
cused on the U.N. resolution autho-
rizing force against Iraq, calling it a
move "closer to peace."
Bush and House Speaker Thomas
Foley (D-Wash.) both expressed op-
position to the idea of calling
Congress back for a special session
to address the gulf crisis.
The president met with House
leaders while keeping an eye on the
United Nations, saying he hoped
Security Council approval of the
resolution would "send perhaps the
strongest signal of all to Saddam
Hussein."
Asked if the U.N. resolution, au-
thorizing attack on Iraqi troops if
they don't leave Kuwait by mid-

January, made a shooting war more
likely, Bush said, "I hope we're
closer to peace and that this will
drive home the point to him that
he's got to get out of Kuwait."
Earlier, in an interview with the
Spanish language network
Univision, Bush said he preferred not
bringing Congress back for a special
session but wanted to sound out
congressional leaders more fully.
Foley and Minority Leader
Robert Michel (R-Ill.) had lunch
with Bush. Afterward, Foley said, "I
hope the president doesn't call back
the 101st Congress ... Reports of
that may be premature."
In the face of increasing calls for
such a session from lawmakers who
had adjourned for the year before the
latest deployment increase. White
House spokesman Marlin Fitzwater
said merely, "Let's wait and see."

"The president's mistake in sens-
ing so many troops should not be
compounded by a further error in us-
ing them in a premature, unprovoked
ground offensive," said former Navy
Secretary James Webb.
Meanwhile, Vice President Dan
Quayle took a swipe at critics who
have said Bush has moved too
quickly in the gulf and have advised
against an outright attack.
"Does patience today risk greater
American casualties tomorrow?"
Quayle asked in a speech at Seton
Hall University in New Jersey.
"With every day that passes," the
plight of the people of Kuwait
"grows more and more desperate," he
said. "Is this moral course of ac-
tion?"

We, the officers and faculty advisors of the Michigan Gamma Chapter of Tau
Beta Pi, wish to congratulate the following people who have achieved- our high
standards and have successfully completed the initiation rituals, thereby
becoming active members of Tau Beta Pi:

Stanley Abraham
Akhil Agrawal
Marcelo Alves
Scott Arens
Mohit Arora
Eric Asselin
Micheal Badalament
Alexander Ballios
Stuart Bauman
Seraj Bohra
John Bolyard
Courtney Bond
Stacey Bond
Monika Boos
Christopher Bower
Darrin Burke
Micheal Calligaro
William Charmley
Hwei Che
George Chen
Burt Chien
Chih-Hsien Chou
Susan Clarke
Keith Cook
Benjamin Custer
Jun Dai
Jake DeNooyer
Stepanie Douglas
Micheal Dryja

Julie Edelen
Naser El-Saheb Tamini
Kristi Enghauser
Jeffrey Eusebio
Brenda Fahling
Brad Poerster
Corey Gannon
Denny Gentry
David Gilbert
Charles Gilmour
Alejandro Graf
Micheal Grant
Eric Haan
Eric Hermanson
Gregory Hoffman
Luke Hohmann
Kathryn Hoover
Jean Hwang
Alison Kalton
Jeffrey Koch
William Krewsky
Sriram Krishnan
Kathy Laberteaux
Kevin Lampi
Jinju Lee
Kyonghun Lee
Deborah Lenz
Wesley Lollar
Micheal McIntyre
Shana Milkie
Eric Mockensturm

Micheal Moore
Mike Murray
John Oeinck
Jung Park
Adam Petravicius
Edward Piekos
B. J. Pohl
Alfred Poy
Michelle Rahn
Saroja Ramanujan
Julia Scheffelin
Mark Schlutt
Stephen Scorpio
Donglong Sheu
Christopher Soles
Paul Stephens
Deinress Stockman
Jordan Stojanovski
Weiquian Sun
Pamela Vergos
Kevin Vliet
Pamela Vogt
Thomas Walling
Timothy Westman
Robert Wieber
Eric Wilcox
Sanjay Yadav
Chris Young
Ian Young

SWAIN
Continued from page 1
many, many years," Swain said.
Some students wanted to know
why more funding wasn't being pro-
vided for the Sexual Assault and
Awareness Prevention Center. Swain
said she was currently working for
such expansions, particularly with
respect to summer orientations.
Swain also discussed the selec-
tion process for the deputized offi-
cers. Candidates must be graduates of

the state police academy and undergo
sensitivity education at the
University, she said.
Many expressed disappointment
over the purpose of the forums and
their lack of effectiveness in chang-
ing policy.
"She's going around, listening to
student's views, and ignoring,
them," said Buchan.
"The forums can't lead anywhere
until students have a democratic
voice," he added.
"There are more than just stu-

dents in the University community,"
Swain said in response to similar
claims.
Another topic discussed was the
University's interim drug and alco-
hol policy. Swain admitted that
some of the policy's sanctions could
be seen as vague but did not agree
any of the sanctions should be re-
moved.
A third forum with Swain is be-
ing held Monday night in the
Michigan League at 6:30.

00

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BGA
Continued from page 1
the Vice-President for Student Ser-
vices, the forums sought to convey
the main issues of unity within the
Black community.
"People need to understand how
we're dependent and need to work
together to ... be united, but not uni-
form to gain success as a people,"
stressed Omega Psi Phi, Inc. alum
and Vice President Provost of Mi-
nority Affairs, Charles Moody.
All of the Black fraternities and
sororities were brought together to
discuss the current problems. "These
forums incorporating all (the differ-
ent letter groups) are important in
letting us work together as one ... es-
pecially in a predominantly white
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campus such as Michigan," said Al-
pha Kappa Alpha, Inc. member
Corie Morman.
Last night more than a hundred
people viewed selected recorded
portions of the teleconference at
Trotter House and shared their
reactions in a local forum.
Much of the discussion centered
on the decision earlier this year by
the National Black Greek Associa-
tion to abolish the traditional pledg-
ing process in favor of a new "intake
process." This decision evolved in
response to the hazing controversies
plaguing college campuses.
Where before, a student might
have spent six weeks to a year pledg-
ing a Black fraternity or sorority,
they now can accept new members
in just a few days.

Although the national organiza-
tions have reached a consensus on
need to accept change, dissenters
don't to believe the organizations'
future relies on the abolishment of
pledging.,
Rozelle Hegeman, a member of
Alpha Kappa Alpha, Inc. feels that
"a weekend just isn't enough time"
to decide on someone. "I understand
that hazing needs to stop ... but par
ticipation in community service
projects would show that a girl will
work for the sorority."
Otherwise, she feels, there will be
"people in organization who won't
work for the community, but just
want to wear the Greek letters."

The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967) is published Monday through Friday during the fall and winter
terms by students at the University of Michigan. Subscription rates via U.S. mail for fall and winter $39
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0

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Editor in Chie
Managing Edi
News Editors
Opinion Edito
Associate E
Weekend Edit
Photo Editor

TAFF:
Of
tor
ditors
tors

Noah Finkel
Krisltine LaLonde
Diane Cook, Ian Hoffman
Josh Miiick, Noelo Vance
David Schwartz
Stephen Henderson,
1. Mathew Miller, Daniel Poux
Ronan Lynch
Kevin Woodson
Jose Juarez

Sports Editor
Associate Editors
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Books
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List Editor

News: Matt Adler, Chris Aendulus, Josephine Balenger, Lai Barager, Michelle Clayton, Lynn Cohn, Brenda Diddeson, Julce Foster,
Jay Garda, Henry Goldblatt, Jennifer Hir, Nicole James, Christine Kiocstra, Amanda Neuman, Shalini Patel.Tam Polak, Mat
Puianim, David Rheingold, Gil Renberg, Betany Robertson, Jon Rosenthal, Usa Sanchez, Gwen Shaffer, Sarah Schweltzer;Puvi
Shah, Lee Shufro, Jesse Snyder, Annabel Vered, Stefanie Vines, Ken Walker, Ganick Wang, Donna Woodwel.
Opinion: Russell Baltimore, Geoff Earle, Mie Fischer, Leslie Heibirn, Jim Laceyk., David Letner. Andrew M. Levy, Jerdier
Mattson, Chris Nordstrom, Tony Silber, Glynn Washington, MeissaWeiner, Kevin Woodson.
Sports: Ken Artz, Jason Bank, Mke Bess, Andy Brown, Walt Butzu, Jeff Cameron, Steven Cohen, Theodore Cox, Andy DeKoftl,
Matthew Dodge, Josh Dubow, Jeni Durst, Jim Foss, Jason Gomberg, Phi Green, R.C. Heaton, David Kraft, Rich Levy, Jeff
Ueberman, Albert in, Rod Loewenthal, Adam Miler, John Niyo, Mat Rennie, David Schedter, Eric Sidar, Andy Stable. Ken Sugkua,
Kevin Sundman, Becky Weiss, Charlie Wolfe, Dan Zoch.
Arts: Mark Smell, Greg Baise, Andy Cahn, Beth Cdqailt, Jerie Dahkmamn, Michael Pal Fischer, Gregg Flaxman, Forrest Green HI,
Brian Jarvinen, Mike Kdody, Mike Kuiavsky, Elizabeth Lenhard, David Lubliner, Mke Moitor, Jon Rosenthal, Latrn Tureky, Sue
Uselmann, Mike Wilson, Kim Yaged, Naboel Zuberi.
Photo Brian Cantoni, Anthony M. Crol, Jennifer Dunetz, Amy Feldman, Krssy Goodman, MIichele Guy, Rob KoenertJodi Mimm,

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