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November 27, 1990 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1990-11-27

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Page 2-The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, November 27, 1990

Calvin and Hobbes

A LOT OF PEO PLE t)OT
4AME INCIPLS, BUATIT1)0!
I'MR KG (P~NCLE
PER ~ S -.

I LVE. PQM( AG To ONE
PRtQk- N

=c, 1990 Universal Press Syndcate

tl .
F

by Bill Watterson Colleges debate deputization:
LMY TCollege Press Service On the other hand, many students and whether they come on campus,"
First there seemed to be a terrible at Millersville University of observed Richard Leonard, security
change in campus crime nationwide. Pennsylvania, where a debate to arm chief at Michigan's Oakland
Now, not so slowly, campuses officers has been raging for years, University, where police have carrie
" ' ,

s
T
6

I

\j -

N

I- -

are changing the way they're defend-
ing themselves against crime.
In recent months schools have
hired more officers, started more so-
phisticated training programs, ex-
panded their arrest powers and, most
controversial of all, begun to arm
their people with guns.
Letting campus police carry guns
is "a logical step to provide better
service," maintained John McGinnis,
head of security at Marquette
University in Milwaukee, whose un-
armed officers currently are fighting
to become commissioned by the
state and thus qualified to carry guns.

don t see any reason for (campus)
police to have guns," reported
Dough Killough, a member of
Millersville's student government.
Nevertheless, scores of schools
are considering it.
The State University of New
York system, the University of
Michigan, California University of
Pennsylvania, Millersville,
Marquette and Mesa State College
all have considered whether to com-
mission their officers and allow
them to carry guns this year.
"Most colleges and universities
can't control who the bad people are,

guns for 20 years.--
"It's good they are carryifig
guns," affirmed Oakland student
Amy Nida. "It makes the students
feel safer."
But, said John Serpe, student
body president at Marquette, where
the campus is divided over a pro-
posal to give their police more pow-
ers, students "aren't knowledgeabl
about what commissioning entails."S
Similarly, about 49 percent of
the students at Millersville State said
they opposed a campus police pro-
posal to carry guns.

Nuts and Bolts
MiK.GMNE -TAT
MR BURNS? YAH.
IV WAT5ON HANG~ ON A
PH-LYMY~'CUR SEC KI.
NEW IN6N.
2'

MIIKE TYANDCGET ME
T$AT GAY ACTVET ON
"n4E-LINE AGAIN, 2' \/
Gu0T AN EPA.\AATSON,
HUH? RANDY BURNS,
WELCOM~E ABO li) 2 tWAS
A JU S-
Ln

OH Y u'1E BLACK.
4110,i~a

by Judd Winick
You NOTICE P. WELLT
I rtwS.

'
---,

ULTIMATUM
Continued from page 1
Persian Gulf.
Saddam, meanwhile, promised to
free at least two Americans held
hostage in Iraq, and diplomats in
Baghdad reported more than 100 for-
eign hostages were moved from
Kuwait to Iraq overnight.
Gorbachev and Soviet Foreign
Minister Eduard Shevardnadze met
with Iraqi Foreign Minister Tariq
Aziz in the Kremlin to demand that
Iraq withdraw its troops from
Kuwait.

Answering questions from legis-
lators in Moscow, Gorbachev said
the gulf crisis was a test of the new
post-Cold War cooperation.
"Our position remains based on
principles, and it includes the fol-
lowing: aggression is inadmissible.
It should be punished, and the pre-
aggression state should be restored,"
Gorbachev said.
He said Saddam could not break
the alliance assembled against Iraq
since its Aug. 2 invasion of Kuwait
and that Iraq's aggression could not
be allowed to prevail "because we are
just moving away from the Cold

i

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POLAND
Continued from page 1
this democracy of Mazowiecki."
Tyminski, 42, who was not
taken seriously by other candidates
until polls indicated a late surge of
support, promised to make Poland
prosperous and assailed the
Mazowiecki government as
incompetent.
Tyminski's promises of wealth
were particularly alluring to voters
worn down by painful economic re-
forms launched by Mazowiecki, who
became the East bloc's first non-
Communist head of government in
1989.
With Mazowiecki's resignation, a

new prime minister presumably
would be nominated to Parliament
by the new president.
Walesa, at his Solidarity union
office in Gdansk, called Tyminski
"an accident in Polish democracy"
and said he was not "a serious man."
With all 49 provinces reporting,
Walesa had nearly 40 percent of the
vote, Tyminski 23 percent and Ma.
zowiecki 18 percent: three minor
candidates split the rest, according to
election commission results col-
lected by the official news agency
PAP. Turnout was put at 61 percent.
Walesa, the charismatic shipyard
worker who marshaled the forces that
ended four decades of Communist
rule, had hoped for a huge mandate

War, when everything was decided
from a position of force."
In the Iraqi capital, American and
British diplomats said more than 100
Americans, Britons and European*
held in Kuwait had been brought to
Baghdad's Mansour Melia hotel. The
group included at least 10 Americans
and 60 Britons.
The diplomats said they were un-
sure if the new arrivals would be
used to replace Germans allowed to
leave strategic sites in Iraq or were
being brought to Baghdad to be re-
leased.
in Sunday's vote. He had said earlier
it would be "horrible" to face
Tyminski in the second round of bal-
loting on Dec. 9.
"I must say I am hesitating," he
said yesterday, but added: "One has
to think over what is good for
Poland."
One newspaper commentator at-
tributed Tyminski's strong showin$,
to support from "a second Poland" of
disaffected rural and small-town vot-
ers who are looking for quick an-
swers to their country's difficulties.
The major candidates and the
press underestimated their numbers,
Piotr Pacewicz wrote yesterday in
the country's largest newspaper,
Gazeta Wyborcza.
may be a lesson for those are
stressed out. Although he has four
papers due this week, he is not pan-
icking. "It will get done, and if not,
oh well," he said.
Now that's mellow.

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STRESS
Continued from page 1
and they didn't, that can be stress-
ful," said LSA junior Michelle, a
counselor at 76-GUIDE, a counsel-
ing hotline.
Unexpectedly, the Thanksgiving
holiday, instead of alleviating stress,
may have added to it, especially for
students who found themselves deal-
ing with family pressures.
"I'm 40-years old, and I go home,
and I feel like 11-years old," said
psychology professor Chris
Peterson. "It's stressful."
The increased stress levels are felt
by University agencies such as
counseling and health services and
76-GUIDE. The increased traffic can
tax those agencies leaving people
feeling "pretty lost," counselor
Michelle said.
"Because everyone is in the same'
boat, people don't want to go to
their friends," she added.
University Counseling Serv ices
offers stresssand time management
appointments and walk-in services
during some hours of the week.
Students can call 764-8312 for more
information.
But students can work to manage,
or just avoid, stress on their own.
"The trick is to avoid it. But that
means you should have been writing
(a paper) back in September,"
Peterson said. But he also offers so-
lutions that can be implemented
now:
"Eat and sleep particularly
well. There's a tendency for people
to stay up all night and skip meals
or eat garbage."
Schedule in recreation, exer-
cise, and personal time.
"Try to remember past suc-
cesses." Which is easy for a senior,
Peterson admits, but not for a first-
year student dealing with finals for
the first time.
Take a reality test. Tell your-
self "I will survive."
Don't procrastinate; do priori-
tize. "You don't have to alphabetize
your spice rack this week." -
Don't make major life deci-
sions - like breaking up with your
boyfriend or girlfriend - during
busy school weeks.
"People wait until the last week
of classes, and they decide to rear-
range their personal life then they
flip out. Everybody should break up
in January, no one should break up
in December" Petersnn 4snid-

The Michigan Daily's
Top Ten Ways to
Reduce 'stress
at Finals Time
9. Have Preacher Mike readselections from Where
the Wild Things Are.
8. T'akeSakeyJake'sguitr nd crsht vry r
.kefor .the sheerpeasure=:of it.:::::<: ::::>
7. Tune into . the Minute. Mouse/Courageous Cat
marathon on the Disney Channel.
6F esutidefor Instant4ont....
5. Run naked through East Lansing chantng
"We're better than you are."
4.: ak crank ~poecllstthat ano T T y .III
3. Go to UGLI and rearrange books by thickness
(pamphlets to the left, dictionaries to the right)
2. Woprk o I~enI yfqr nw huck NIrri f# :
.::>E sca e::from:::aerng Buikading,.::::.:::.
1. (Safe) sex.
-Andrew Levy and Jeff Sheran
44 7t
The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967) is published Monday through Friday during the fall and winter
terms by students at the University of Michigan. Subscription rates viaU.S.mail for fall andwinter $39
fortwo terms, $22 forone term. Campus delivery$28.00fortwo terms. Prorated rates: $25 fortwoterms;
$11 for one term.
The Michigan Daily is a member of The Associated Press and the Student News Service.
ADDRESS: The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard, Ann Arbor, MI 48109.
PHONE NUMBERS: News (313) 764-0552, opinion 747-2814, Arts 763-0379, Sports 747-3336, Cir-
culation 764-0558, Classified advertising 764-0557, Display advertising 764-0554, Billing 764-0550

stress by spending time alone, lis-
tening to soft music. "I make sure I
take some time out for myself, not
run around like a chicken with my
head cut off."
LSA senior Mel Drews' attitude

Career Opportunities
at Morgan
for University of Michigan students
interested in
Operations Management
Research
Sales
Tradin g
Please plan to attend our
inform ation presentation on
Tuesday; Aovember 27'
:0())Fpm
Michigan .nion, Kuenzel Room
..ll.

0

EDITOFIAL STAFF:
Editor in Chief
Managing Editor
News Editors
Opinion Editor
Assocae Editors
Weekend Editors
Photo Editor

Sports Editor
Noah Finkel Associate Editors
Kristine LaLonde
Diane Cook, Ian Hof6man
Josh Minick, Noele Vance Arts Editors
David Schwartz Books
Stephen Henderson, Film
i. Matlhew Miler, Daniel Poux Music
Ronan Lynch TheatEr
Kevin Woodson
Jose Juarez Lst Editor

Mike Gil
Andy Gottesman,
David Hyman, Eric Lemont,
Ryan Schreiber, Jeff Sheran
Kristin Palm, Annette Petrusso
Caroyn Poor
Jon 9!IlBrent Edwards
Pete Shapiro
Mary Beth Barber
GI Renberg

News: Matt Adler, Chris Afendulus, Josephine Ba enger, Lar Barager, Michelle Clayton, Lynne Cohn, BrendaDiddnson, Julie Foster,
Jay Garcia, Henry Goldblatt, Jennifer Hirl, Nicole James, Christine Koostra, Amanda Neuman, Shaini Pasl, Tami Polak, Matt
Puliam, David Rheingold, Gil Renberg, Behany Robertson, Jon Rosenthal, Usa Sanchez, Gwen Shaffer, Sarah Schweitzer, PuMv
Shahtee Shufro, Jesse Snyder, Annabel Vered, Stefanie Vines, Ken Walker, Garrck Wang, Donna Woodwel.
Opinion: Russell Baltimore, Geoff Earle, Mike Fischer, Leslie Heilbrwn, Jim Lacey Jr., David Leilner, Andrew M. Levy, Jennifer
Mattson, Chris Nordstrom, Tony Silber, Glynn Washington, Meissa Weiner, Kevin Woodson.
Sports: Ken Artz, Jason Bank, Andy Brown, Mike Bess, Steve Blonder, Walt Buu, Jeff Cameron, Theodore Cox, Andy DeKore, Malt
Dodge, Josh Dubow, Jeni Durst, Jim Foss, Phi Green, RC. Heaton, David Kralt, JeffLUeberman, Rich Levy, Albert Un, Rod
Loewenhal, Adam Miler, John Nyo, Sarah Osburn, Matt Rennie, David Schechter, Ken Sigura, Erie Sklar, Andy Stabile, Kevin
Sundman,.Dan Zoch.
Artes Mark BineIl, Greg Baise, Andy Cahn, Beth CqMIL Jane Dahlman, IMichael Pa Fischer, Gregg a wan, Forrest Green NI,
Brian Jarvinen, Miks Kdmody,ike Kunavey, Elizabeth Lenhard, Davd Lubliner, Mike Mot, Jon Rosenthal, Laren Turetsky, Sus
Uselmann. Mkse Wison, Kkn Yaged, Nabeel Zuberi.

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