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November 26, 1990 - Image 5

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The Michigan Daily, 1990-11-26

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The Michigan Daily - Monday, November 26, 1990 - Page 5

Red ribbons for SADD
To the Daily:
Back in the days of Socrates, Greeks
were know to hold great feasts and become
incomprehensibly drunk. At dawn, the
tired Greeks would totter safely home,
without any concern for their personal
safety.
Today, Americans too know how to
party. Unlike the ancient Greeks, however,
we do have to fear for our personal safety.
Today we must fear drunken drivers.
In this country alone, one person every
23 minutes is injured or killed in an acci-
dent caused by drunken driving. These vic-
*-tims consist of sober drivers, unsuspecting
passengers, and innocent pedestrians.
The victims are often college students
with promising futures who dream of a ca-
reer or marriage. This dream is snuffed out
in a matter of moments because someone
was not responsible about his or her drink-
ing.
This problem is even more pronounced
during the days between Thanksgiving and
New Year's Day. The days of eggnog,
rumcake and champagne have begun.
Students Against Driving Drunk (SADD)
would like everyone to be aware of this
danger. We need to be on the lookout for
possible tragedies and avoid them. No one
wants to attend a funeral over Christmas.
Tomorrow, members of SADD will be
passing out red ribbons on the Diag. We
esk that these ribbons be tied to cars and
front doors to remind people to be careful
during the holiday time. Please pick up a
ribbon and help promote awareness of the
dangers of driving while intoxicated.
Abi Lippshutz
L& junior
SADD president

Protesters opposed
any use of violence
To the Daily:
This letter is in response to your cov-
erage of the activities during the Nov. 15
protest. Your failure to give an accurate
picture of what occurred has lead to one
major misconception: That we "clashed"
with police and were forced out of the
building.
After a peaceful rally outside the
Fleming Administration Building, a small
group of students decided that we should
attempt to enter the building to show our
solidarity with the 20 or so students that
were already in the building on the second
floor.
At that time, the doors to the building
were closed and locked by campus secu-
rity; however, one door was opened to al-
low staff inside the building to leave and it
was then that doors were forced open and
the students flooded in.
After a short time inside the building it
became apparent that the doors to the
stairwell were blocked by campus security.
It was discussed among the students
whether or not we should force our way
through and fill the building.
Again, one small group advocated the
use of force to "take the building," but the
vast majority of students felt that any vio-.
lence, no matter how small, would be
wrong. After about half an hour the deci-
sion was made that there was nothing to
be gained inside the building and our inter-
ests would be best served by leaving the
building on our own, peacefully. The stu-
dents on the second floor remained and
were later arrested (again without any re-

sistance on their part).
I must stress that at no time did any
protester in the building harass or threaten
any member of the University community
or the Ann Arbor police. I was in the
building and had discussions with a mem-
ber of the Ann Arbor police department. I
explained that they had no reason to fear
any violence on our part; he said that he
understood our aims and methods agreed
that the police and University staff had
nothing to fear from the students.
We, the students, left of our own voli-
tion to prevent any violence from breaking
out and endangering ourselves or the offi-
cers who were present.
Our protests in the past days have not
been against armed police or police in
general. I and most others recognize the
vital need for law enforcement and we offer
our appreciation to officers of the law ev-
erywhere who risk their lives so that we
may live safely. We are protesting to pro-
tect democracy on our campus, a democ-
racy where people are free to exchange
ideas however unpopular, a democracy
where reason is the guiding principal, a
democracy where violence and force have
no place.
The ideas that we hold dear do not have
to be backed by guns or clubs or violence.
They are backed by two much more pow-
erful weapons: Reason and truth.
Blake Girardot
LSA sophomore
No guns, no guts
To the Daily:
I have been a student at the University
since 1987. During this time I have seen
very little accomplished by MSA except

arguing among its members.
Finally, last week MSA appeared as
though they were going to do something
constructive for the students of this cam-
pus for the first time in recent history.
They organized sit-ins, camp-outs, build-
ing takeovers; I have never seen this god-
dam campus so alive.
But the amateur way with which events
were handled Nov. 16 deserves an apology
of the quickest order by MSA. They let
the student population down. This campus
was mobilized, charged and waiting for di-
rection: in essence the word "boycott."
Then something happened, something
extremely stupid. Somebody transferred
power to the crowd gathered at the Union,
putting the onus on them to make the de-
cision; and, of course, it failed.
A boycott of classes was the next logi-
cal step and the person at the helm, the
president of MSA, basically said, "we're
not sure what we want, what do you
think?" The worst part was that it hap-
pened in front of the television cameras.
MSA couldn't, once again, make a coher-
ent decision and made the entire student
body look like an indecisive bunch of
amateur activists.
The wind has been taken out of this
once-great student movement. Hopefully
somebody will take charge, get some advi-
sors, make some definite plans and show
the administration, the students, the
Democratic Party of Ann Arbor, the City
of Ann Arbor, the State of Michigan and
other campuses across the country that
we're not just a bunch of sophomoric,
petty activists that can't get anything ac-
complished.
Michael James Monkman
LSA junior

Marines discriminate
by sexual orientation
To the Daily:
As a homosexual, Chicano American,
and human being, I was extremely upset
by an ad run on behalf of the U.S.
Marines on Page 8 of the Oct. 30 issue of
the Daily. The ad states, "Run Your Own
Company at 26." That's fine. It also says,
"We're looking for a few good college stu-
dents and graduates." All that is fine, ex-
cept for one thing.
I wanted to be a marine.
I wanted to run my own company at
26. I was a good college student. They
would have taken me immediately except
for one thing: my sexual orientation.
The marines do not accept homosexu-
als. They discriminate on the basis of sex-
ual orientation. I would like to make this
clear to all readers who might have been
misled by the ad into thinking that the
Marines are an equal opportunity em-
ployer. They are not.
Furthermore, at the bottom of the ad it
states that October is the month which the
Marines "pay tribute to the rich cultural
traditions of all Hispanic Americans and
recognize the sacrifices of our own
Hispanic Marines." The only sacrifices I
know of involving "Hispanics" (I prefer
Chicano) and Marines are instances of
Marines killing and raping "Hispanics."
My people suffered under the U.S.
Marine occupations of Central America
prior to the rise of Sandino and still suffer
today from the effects of U.S. tax dollars
in El Salvador.
Martin Roscone
LSA junior

Daily uses unworthy
sources about Israel
-To the Daily:
Contrary to what both the Daily
(editorial, 10/17/90) and Karima
Bennoune (letter, 11/8/90) attempt
to claim, the Israeli government did
not "initiate" the violence on the
Temple Mount Oct. 8. And the
"alternative" news sources which
they employ to substantiate their
claims are worse than questionable.
Israel Shahak, the chair of the
.Israeli League for Human and Civil
Rights, the sole source of "facts"
named in the Daily's editorial, was
himself ousted from the Israeli
chapter of the International League
for the Rights of Man after having
failed to document, investigate or
verify any of the accusations which
he was then making against the
Israeli state.
The other two leading members
of the organization, Felicia Langer
and Lea Tsemel, are members of
Israel's Revolutionary Communist
League. Whatever else you might
say about their politics, these are
definitely people with an axe to
grind and can in no way be regarded
as an unbiased news source. To just
blindly accept their word that the
Israeli government initiated the vio-
lence on the Temple Mount out of
some desire to kill Arabs and bring
down international condemnation
on themselves, just doesn't make
sense.
But what disturbs me more
deeply is the hate-filled, venomous
side of Bennoune's letter, accusing
an earlier Daily article which inter-
viewed American college students
studying in Israel as being some-
how "racist and disgusting," and as
showing "a complete lack of com-
passion and basic human decency."
Decency? Lack of compassion?
How about what really happened at
the Temple Mount? What
Bennoune and the Daily neglected
to tell their readers? How about the
call across the Temple Mount loud-
speakers which incited the riots?
"Jihad!" ("Holy war!"); and "Itbakh
al-Yahud!" ("Slaughter the Jews!").
This may come as a shock to
you, Karima Bennoune, but Jews
are people too. We are not animals
for which you or anyone else has an
open license to kill, and throwing
stones down onto peaceful wor-
shippers, or setting fire to a police
station, is not some new form of
non-violent protest.
0 It may also come as a shock to
you, but Americans studying in
Israel are also people, and it is not
an article interviewing them that is
racist, or disgusting, but rather your
insinuations aimed at denying their
humanity.
Eric Edidin

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