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November 19, 1990 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1990-11-19

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9

Page 2 -The Michigan Daily -Monday, November 19,1990

Calvin and Hobbes

by Bill Watt ersonStudents snack, discuss sex

"CW IS T14E DIORAMA
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TK ALMOST
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TO NUT ONE IN? GLUED

LEK ) THE R ADRUKJNER.
JUST RAN WTJrOF
eiTHAE SCENE, LE AKN
~1 .THOSE CLWD OF
: B DUST!
by Bill Watterson

in residence hail p
by Garrick Wang The "Sex and Snacks" programs
Daily Staff Reporter are informally organized. Residents

Calvin and Hobbes

NoU'JE NEVER ~4 kVAN OSUGXTIOA,
AN ASSIGNMENT, OR DzI\ U NI
All (OUR. LE! {U IAVENO
AT ALL! IT MUST

WIP TAIIN tEN
SMK FIOJ AE
4

THE REAL FU OF
LWMN VWSEL IS
THAT {Ot GET To
BE S yndABouT t
c 1990Unversal Press Syndicate f- t N&

While munching on potato chips
and drinking soda, students living in
residence halls are openly discussing
sexuality, sex-roles, and relation-
ships with their peers.
The students are participating in
one of the University's "Sex and
Snacks" programs for residence hall
students. The programs are presented
annually by the staff in each resi-
dence hail.
"It's important that women and
men talk about themselves because
our culture perpetuates myths about
men and women in how they think
and act," said Mary Lou Antieau,
South Quad building director.
"The 'Sex and Snacks' program
is being done in response to resi-
dents' concerns about safe sex," said
LSA senior Kathy Park, a West
Quad resident director. She said
many first-year students attend these
meetings to learn how to deal with
the pressures related to finding rela-
tionships and making new friends.

in attendance submit written ques-
tions to the facilitators anony-
mously. These questions are read by
the facilitators, but the students dis-
cuss them.
'It's important that
women and men talk
about themselves
because our culture
perpetuates myths
about men and
women in how they
think and act'
- Mary Lou Antineau
South Quad Building
Director
"Sex in this country is a very
privatized matter," said LSA senior
Daniel Hunter, an East Quad resident
fellow. "You will get a more honest
range of questions if they are sub-
mitted anonymously."

. - - - --

a

Nuts and Bolts
-Wt HYo A PP
AN SF HWDA

LUMl35?
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a/

HAPPY -rHANK5CoWtNCG.
1HAT5 KIND OFHAIF HEARD.

by Judd Winick
WELL, WHY DO
= Ai 015S WEAR~
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4 ~
SCoo

SUPPORT

Continued from page 1
police department," the Ann Arbor
Democrats called for the University
to suspend deputization plans and
create committees to the explore the
issue.
Joe Neely, chair of the Wash-
tenaw County Republican Commit-
tee, said his party will not meet
until Nov. 26, but he does not
expect it will pass a resolution simi-
lar to the Democrats'.
"I don't see anything we can con-
tribute to one side or the other," he
said. No one from the Ann Arbor

Republican Party could be reached
for comment.
The Feminist Women's Union
created a committee called the
Feminist Women's Committee
Against Deputization (FWCAD) to
give support to the anti-deputization
movement.
"We do encompass what the
Student Rights (Commission) be-
lieves. We're working with them for
the same goals," said FWCAD
member Karen Karolle.
"If safety is really the issue, then
they're doing the wrong thing, said
FWCAD member Cecilia Ober.
"Having 23 men and one woman

rogram
The questions submitted do
with issues ranging from male and
female perceptions of sexuality to
homosexuality.
"Although 'Sex and Snacks' is a
fun thing to do, educational pro-
gramming is needed to inform the
residents of the various options and
services available regarding human
sexuality," said LSA senior Tracy
Boyce; a Stockwell resident direct*
Future programs may include
workshops about contraceptive use
or safe sex and presentations pertain-
ing to acquaintance rape and sexual
assault.
"I would like to see another 'Sex
and Snacks' presentation because the
first one built up trust needed to dis-
cuss the difficult topic of sex,"
Matthew Stevens, a LSA first-
student, said.st
"I thought it was good because it
answered a lot of questions I had that
I wouldn't have asked on a one-to-
one basis," Brad Schenker, a first-
year engineering student, said.
walking around with guns - how is
that safe?"
FWCAD participated in the
protests last week and are now wait-
ing to see what the Students' Rig*
Commission plans to do, said
FWCAD member Anne Herlick.
"We really got more students out and
brought attention to the issue."
FWCAD would rather attain in-
creased funding for groups like the
Sexual Assault Prevention and
Awareness Center, consistent light-
ing on the Diag, better education,
and increase services like Nite O
than spend money on a deputized
lice force.
Michigan," said Doug Parker, who
handles logistics and finance.
"We had support from a lot of
people and we met a lot of people. I
guess the one thing that will proba-
bly last the longest is the friends and
the contacts we've made," he said.
"I'm definitely coming back
Australia, no question about it, it's
just a matter of time," Parker added.
worse in the long run for U.S. inter-
ests.
Students attending the address
were impressed with the different
perspective Akins presented about
the crisis.
"He presented a different pictu0
than the media," said engineering
sophomore Kelly Carney.
"He brought up a lot of facts we
weren't aware of," said LSA senior
Kris Matey. "The information we
have been getting has been pretty
much censored."

T rTE NT JO N AI)VERTISltsEitS!
Please note the following early display advertising
deadlines due to the Thanksgiving holiday:

CAM
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Publication date
Monday, Nov. 26
Tuesday, Nov. 27
Wednesday, Nov. 28
Weekend, Nov. 30

Deadline
Monday, Nov. 19
Tuesday, Nov. 20
Wednesday, Nov. 21
Wednesday, Nov. 21

R GENUINE
RAFT
BARREL
3.95
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deposit
supplies last

I

RACE
Continued from page 1
"The Sunrunner is officially re-
tired, and that was its last race. It
will finish its little tour, then it will
be put away somewhere nice and
neat like a museum," said Mike
McAlear, a strategist/programmer.
The finish was also the end of a
one and a half year effort that in-

volved more than 110 students from
the School of Engineering, LSA, the
School of Natural Resources, and the
School of Business Administration.
Although most of the team
members are relieved, they are also
satisfied with the experience. "It was
just neat to see all these people from
different countries all pull together
to help out the University of

The last Weekend Magazine will be published
December 7.

665-4431

I

I818 S. STATE, ANN ARBOR
OPEN 'TIL MIDNIGHT, SUN-THURS
2 AM, FRI & SAT

AKINS
Continued from page 1
Akins said a solution to the con-
flict had to include a chance for Sad-
dam to concede without being dis-
graced
"Saddam... must be allowed to
withdraw from Kuwait with dig-
nity," he said, adding that such an
outcome would be easier for the Iraqi
people to accept.
Akins' proposals for ending the
conflict included a U.N.-sponsored
plebiscite in Kuwait and U.S.

movement toward a peace conference
on the Israeli-Palestinian issue.
He asserted that U.N.-sponsored
sanctions were the best route to re-
solving the crisis, and suggested that
further action be postponed for about
a year, the amount of time the sanc-
tions would need to be effective.
"The sanctions must be given
time," Akins said, "but we have un-
fortunately gone beyond sanctions."
If the U.S. does depose Saddam,
Akins expressed the fear that the new
superpower in the region would be
Iran, an outcome he felt would be

FiNO0

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TEACH-IN
Continued from page 1
In contrast, Saddam's role as a
national hero in Iraqthat can stand
up to the west and instills pride in
his country was also discussed. The
Arab view is letting the situation
cool itself down, but the whole
country will mobilize behind him"
in the event of war, Vincent added.
"This country is making a major
mistake again," Siblani said. Like
all people, Arabs desire "freedom,
democracy and human rights," he
"Who Will Fight Our War? The
TAPES
Continued from page 1.
tices-Thurgood Marshall and Sandra
Day O'Connor-agreed with that
assessment.
The Justice Department had
joined with Noriega's lawyers in op-
posing the request.
The court also turned down a
formal appeal the cable network
filed.
In a dissenting opinion for him-
self and O'Connor, Marshall said
"this case is of extraordinary conse-
quence for freedom of the press."
"Our precedence makes unmistak-
ably clear that any prior restraint of
expression comes to this court bear=
ing a heavy presumption against its
constitutional validity and that the
proponent of this drastic remedy car-
ries a heavy burden of showing justi-
fication for its imposition," Mar-
shall said.
Jane Kirkley, executive director
Reporter's Committee for Freedom

Draft and How It Works," led by
Mary Roth of Ann Arbor Draft, GI
and Vets' Counselling Center, and
Richard Cleaver of the American
Friends Service Committee, was
dominated by discussions of the Se-
lective Service System and how it
will administer the draft.
Roth and Cleaver discussed that
deferments would no longer be avail-
able. Cleaver made the point that
young adults shouldn't "wait 'til the
draft comes" and that they ought to
be "resisting war."
While Roth and Cleaver indicated
that young people are concerned
about being inducted into the mili-
tary - armed services currently have

2.1 million people - the United
States doesn't need more personn
to add to its army or navy, they sai
If Congress reinstates a draft, as
commanded by the President, in-
ductees will have to show "religious
or moral objection to war," Cleaver
said.
In "War At Home and the War in
the Persian Gulf: A Black Perspec-
tive," students and community
members heard Liz Allen, a veteran
of the Vietnam War, say "War is n*
new to me."
The next teach-in is tentatively
scheduled for Thursday Nov. 29. A
hotline for teach-in information is
763-3037.

The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967) is published Monday through Friday during the fall and winter
terms by students at the University of Michigan. Subscription rates via U.S. mail forfallandwinter$39
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Editor in Chief
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Assocate Editors
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