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November 07, 1990 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1990-11-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Ice hockey
vs. Michigan State
Friday, 7:30 p.m.
Yost Ice Arena

SPORTS

Volleyball
vs. Minnesota
Friday, 7:30 p.m.
at Minneapolis, MN

a.
4

! ;

The Michigan Daily

Wednesday, November 7, 1990

Page9

Jeff Sheran

Steinberg to address 'U' students

Howard flirts with
Prop 48 standing
Blue-chip recruit Juwan Howard's verbal commitment to the Michigan
basketball program was welcome news to all associated with the Wolver-
ines. Now for some unwelcome news.
Howard's coach at Chicago Vocational High School, Richard Cook,
confirmed that the 6-foot-9 forward is only a partial qualifier under Propo-
sition 48, which requires eligible recruits to post a 2.0 high school grade-
point and an 18 on the ACT.
"He's close," Cook said, citing that Howard has yet to score an 18 in
two attempts, despite maintaining a 3.0 GPA. Cook revealed that Howard
is still awaiting scores from his third test.
Michigan has admitted other Prop 48 recruits after individual evalua-
tion. Rumeal Robinson and Terry Mills both enrolled at the University
without SAT scores of at least 700, the corresponding minimum. Yet
Michigan maintains a hardline stance on admitting athletes of question-
ableacadmic tandng.For that reason, Cook said he
would have preferred Howard to
commit to Arizona State, the run-
ner-up in the recruiting race. He
would not comment why, but
Howard's academic situation
-. looms large as a possible reason.
Howard said he committed to
Michigan because of its proximity
to Chicago. "I don't know if that's
his full reason or not," Cook said.
"If so, he should have gone to
DePaul."
DePaul, which is Cook's alma
r ; y mater, is located in Chicago, and
is less competitive academically
H ow ardthan Michigan.
It's impossible to speculate what Howard's score will be when it ar-
rives in the mail in a few weeks, but the best scenario would obviously
be for him to earn the 18. If he doesn't, University officials must decide
whether or not to admit Howard.
Or do they?
The decision should be a clear-cut one based on a conspicuous prece-
dent. Robinson graduated Michigan with a degree, and more importantly,
an education. He left behind a basketball program and a university that
benefitted immeasurably from his enrollment at Michigan. The ath-
lete/university relationship proved fruitful for both parties.
Howard is unproven academically and athletically on the collegiate
level. But he has demonstrated a commitment to success that greatly re-
flects Michigan's own credo. Those close to Howard, including Cook,
laud him as a hard worker, someone who would make the most of an op-
portunity to attend college at Michigan.
It seems Michigan would likewise benefit from Howard's presence in
Ann Arbor. He is a top-five recruit nationally, and would be an exciting
addition to a young basketball program.
It doesn't really sound like a tough decision to me.
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99 copies ar 8M x 11, Canon laser copies.

COMEDY
COMPANY
PRESENTS

by Jeff Sheran
Daily Sports Editor
In French, the word "agent" refers
to a police officer, a necessary and
respected occupation. In English, the
term often describes all that is loath-
some and parasitic in the world of
professional athletics.
Then there is Leigh Steinberg, at-
torney at law. Steinberg, who will
address Michigan students at the Law
Quad this Friday, has helped create a
conspicuous distinction between the
terms "agent" and "attorney," for rea-
sons beyond the decorations on one's
office wall.
The Berkeley graduate began rep-
resenting athletes in 1975, when his
friend, Steve Bartkowski, asked him
for help. Bartkowski entered the At-
lanta Falcons' offices as the first

pick overall in the NFL Draft; he ex-
ited, with Steinberg at his side, as
the highest paid rookie to that date.
Since then, Steinberg has devel-
oped an impressive client list, from
Jeff George to Will Clark to Jim
Harbaugh. He has also modeled for
Gentleman's Quarterly, and been
interviewed by Playboy. Steinberg's
accolades include the Cyril Magnin
Humanitarian Award and Sports
Lawyer of the Year, among others.
Steinberg has views about his
profession that often differ from oth-
ers' perceptions of the sports law
field.
"With the term agent, the nega-
tivity is probably warranted," he
said. "But as an attorney, I have a

greater responsibility. They say an
athlete dies two deaths. It's my job
to prepare the athlete so that his re-
tirement is not a death, but a rebirth
into a new kind of society."
Steinberg urges his clients to be-
come active in their communities,
especially charity campaigns.
"Athletes have a tremendous
obligation to serve as role models,"
Steinberg said. "And I find that they
enjoy the efforts."
It might seem questionable that
Steinberg encourages his clients to
perform charity when his profession
derives its dividend from the athlete's
salary, but not to Steinberg.
"Several times I offered to reduce
my fee by a large percentage if the

(NFL) owners would correspond by
lowering ticket prices," Steinberg
said. "Then one day, an ownet put
his arm around me and said, 'Prfces
are a function of supply and de-
mand.' To this day, no owner has
taken me up on my offer."
While Steinberg has excelled in
sports law, most find it impossible
to even break into the field. To that,
Steinberg responds, "If people used
as much energy and creativity in
finding a job as they did working at
one, they would find it easier than it
seems."
Steinberg will appear Friday' at 4
p.m. in Hutchins Hall, Room 150
of the Law Quad. All are invited to
attend.

CCHA Scorecard ,

Standings
TEAM (OVERALL}

Rec. Pts. GF GA

1.
2.1
3.1
4.1
5.
7.1
8.
9.

Michigan (6-2-0)
Lake Superior (6-1-1)
Bowling Green (5-3-0)
Michigan St. (3-3-2)
Ohio State (5-2-1)
Ferris State (2-3-3)
Western Mich. (3-3-2)
Miami (3-4-1)
Ill-Chicago (0-8-0)

6-2-0
5-0-1
5-3-0
3-3-2
3-2-1
2-3-3
2-2-2
1-4-1
0-8-0

12
11
10
8
7
7
6
3
0

50
31
40
37
22
32
20
17
13

28
12
37
24
30
19
35
48

HOCKEY NOTEBOOK
ESE to skate puck from:
Munn to Yost for charity

t-eisner

Results
Friday. November 2
Michigan 3, Ferris State 2 (OT)
Bowling Green 8, Michigan State 4
Ohio State 5, Miami 3
Lake Superior 2, UIC 1 (OT)
Western Michigan 9, Merrimack 8
Saturday. November 3
Ferris State 7, Michigan 3
Bowling Green 5, Michigan State 4
Lake Superior 7, UIC 2
Ohio State 3, Miami 1
Merrimack 5, Western Michigan 3

Upcoming Games
Friday. November 2
Michigan State at Michigan
(PASS - Live - 7:40)
Western Michigan at Lake Superior
Bowling Green at Miami
UIC at Ohio State
Ferris State at Notre Dame
Saturday. November 3
Michigan at Michigan State
Western Michigan at Lake Superior
Bowling Green at Miami
UIC at Ohio State
Notre Dame at Ferris State

by Matt Rennie
Daily Hockey Writer
By the time the puck is dropped
before Friday's Michigan-Michigan
State hockey game, a whole lot of
skating will have already been done.
Michigan's Sigma Phi Epsilon
fraternity will skate a 70-mile route
from East Lansing to Ann Arbor
while carrying the official game
puck in an effort to raise money for
charity. Since the state of Michigan
falls outside the boundaries of the
polar ice cap, the Sig Ep brothers
will skate on rollerblades rather than
ice skates.
Between 25 and 30 members of
the fraternity plan to alternate shifts
on the long journey, while the rest
of the house is helping to raise
pledges. The proceeds from the effort
go to the Ronald McDonald House.
The fraternity has already amassed
approximately $500 in pledges -
their goal is $1,000.
The "Skate from State" idea is

the brainchild of Jerry Ericksonithe
head barber at the Coach and Four
barber shop, which is sponsoring the
event, along with Mr. Spot's and
L.A.'s Club Cafe.
"We figured it would be some-
thing to pump the fans up for this
team," Erickson said. "At the saie
time, we're raising money for a good
cause."
INJURY UPDATE: Team co-
captain David Harlock practiced
Monday for the first time since suf-
fering a sprained knee against fIlli-
nois-Chicago. Harlock was forced to
sit out for the Ferris State series, but
expects to be back this weekend.,7
"It felt good to be back &-ithe
ice," Harlock said. "I hope to be100
percent for the weekend." .
CHEAPER THAN SCALPRS:
Hockey fans who were unable to ob-
tain tickets for the MSU game-can
hear all the action from J dd Siroft
and Lyle Wolberg on WJJX (640 on
the AM dial). ..

All games begin at 7:30 local time, unless noted
CCHA Player of the Week
Ohio State sophomore goalie Mike Bailes stopped 65 of 69 shots in 5-3
and 3-1 victories last weekend against Miami
CCHA Scoring Leader
Michigan right wing Denny Felsner's 13 goals in eight games matches
last year's eight game total by last year's Hobey Baker Award winner,
ex-Spartan Kip Miller.

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OQ

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LD, A4pf

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.1l f tI II

GC

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November 8, 9, and

10 8:0opm

Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre

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